Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 27, 2019

Hi folks - Apologies for the tardiness of this week's newsletter. We lost the power for a few hours due to our hurrican-force winds so I'm scrambling to get back on track! Tomorrow is predicted to be pretty darn cold. Please pick up from outdoor sites early! We do our best to protect your veggies but sometimes our Mother Nature has other ideas. - Taylar
A note about reusing packaging: Please bring clean cardboard egg containers back to your site! We'll return them to our egg producers for re-use. And, while we can't reuse your plastic bags, our friends at the Montpelier Food Shelf can, and will! If you return your CLEAN plastic bags to your site, we'll get them to Montpelier. Thanks!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Salad Turnips, Parsley, Black Radish, Radicchio, Yellow Onions, Celeriac, Green Savoy Cabbage, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Cauliflower

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Radicchio, Black Radishes, Celeriac, Green Savoy Cabbage, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Cauliflower

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Slowfire Bakery Bread: The theme for this week's pantry share seems to be "young men making it in Vermont's food production world." Slowfire Bakery is run by Scott Medellin, a young baker based in Jeffersonville. He bakes his sourdoughs like this malt country in a wood-fired oven with regionally sourced, organic grains.
Sweet Rowen Farmstead Cheddar: Made in small batches with milk from his heritage lineback breed, this mild cheddar from our friend Paul Lisai down the road is a great melting cheddar, perfect for grilled cheese sandwiches or nachos -- and also is delicious for snacking on! Paul is a young farmer in his mid-30's with his small herd topping out around 65 head. He's been farming for about 10 or so years, with a stint here at Pete's Greens while he was at Sterling College, getting his dairy farm off the ground.
Eggs: Eggs this week from either Axel Mckenzie in Greensboro (at 14, one of our youngest producers in the share) or Ben Butterfield of Besteyfield Farm in Hinesburg. We'll be rotating some of Ben's eggs back into our egg mix. Ben uses ethical, smart, and conscientious practices to raise his hens, resulting in yummy eggs. Ben is a fairly new farmer but has already been "scaling up" his operations. He started his business at the Intervale Center in Burlington before expandng over to Hinesburg.
Cheese Share From Sweet Rowen Farmstead in West Glover (or Albany, depending on who you are) comes Mountain Ash, a bloomy rind cow's milk cheese made with a layer of food grade ash. The rind is completely edible and you'd be missing out if you didn't enjoy it!
Hub, one of the carrot farmers Pete met in the Netherlands
Mr. Nobel's first bulb harvester

Pete's Travel Notes

Last week I took a really interesting trip to Europe to learn about winter carrot harvesting. It's common in central Europe to heavily mulch carrots with straw in the fall and dig them all winter. I've long wanted to experiment with this method as the quality of carrots stored in the soil is exceptional. It would work well in VT in years that we have consistent snow cover (hard to imagine we ever don't this winter!), but in years in which the snow melts and we then get below zero temps, the tops of the carrots would freeze even with a heavy straw mulch. So we'll probably dabble in this method but unlikely as it's too risky to store a large amount of carrots this way. 

I was also looking into different types of carrot harvesters. The harvester we currently use is called a top lifter. It harvests one row at a time. Last year we grew 25 acres of carrots on which we planted 25 million carrot seeds on 121 miles of row! It takes forever to harvest them one row at a time and often in the fall we're racing rain, snow, and mud. We'd like to find a more efficient harvest method. In Europe many farms use harvesters that are called share lifters, they act like a potato digger. I learned a lot watching them in action. 

I also visited some companies that make harvest equipment. At Nobel in the Netherlands, where they make carrot and bulb harvesters, I happened to meet the founder on the factory floor. This is a big place, maybe 3 acres of factory; they send equipment all over the world. Old man Nobel stops in a couple times a month to look things over. The story is that back in the 50's as a kid he worked in a flower bulb warehouse. One day he accidentally tipped over a pallet of flower bulbs that were separated by color. The colors got mixed and his boss made him buy the bulbs. He planted them and when harvest time came decided to build a harvest machine to cut the labor. That launched his company. 
More to come as we explore new options for growing and harvesting our famous carrots!
~Pete
How we harvest carrots now
Above: a video showing how we harvest carrots now
Below: a video showing winter carrot harvest
video

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A mix of spinach, sorrel, shoots, cress, and baby kale.
Radicchio:  A member of the Chicories family along with endive and escarole, radicchio resembles a small red lettuce. Like all the members of this family, the leaves have some bitterness. You can chop radicchio and add it to your salad for some color and extra flavor. It is also quite good brushed with olive oil before tossing on the grill. Try adding some to risotto. Keep unwashed radicchio in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer for up to a week.
Salad Turnips: These fresh baby turnips can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw they have a texture similar to a radish, but are not so sharp. Or slice, dice, or quarter them and saute with butter or oil. Cook until just tender and still a little crisp. Just a little salt or maybe a little bit of vinegar is all they need. Cooked with butter and given a slight drizzle of honey and even picky little eaters may gobble them up. Don't forget the greens! Turnip greens are tender and flavorful. Chop and saute with the turnips for a side dish, or cook up with other greens, or by themselves. I often chop them and toss them into pasta sauces.
Black RadishBlack radishes are firmer, drier, and stronger than other radishes - this is a very different radish from your red/pink globes! You can eat these raw or cooked but they are bitter when eaten raw. Try shredding them to add to a salad, slaw, or relish (peeled or unpeeled), or peel and slice thin, then salt and drain and mix with sour cream as a spread for chewy rye bread. Or, blend minced radish with creamy cheese, smoked fish, or pate. Cooked black radishes taste like turnips but with less reliable cooking time. You can add them to soups, stews, braises, or stir-fries, or chop finely and add to ground raw meat. Wrap unwashed, topped radishes in newspaper or perforated plastic and refrigerate. Don't let them get moist or they will mold. Their taste mellows as they store and are fine for grating and shredding even after months of storage. I recommend scrubbing them before eating, especially if you keep the peel on.
Celeriac: Celeriac, also called celery root, is a vegetable that cleans up well. Once you peel away its gnarled outer layer, you find a sparkling-white interior with a clean, refreshing taste that has wide appeal. Once prepared, it shows no signs of its humble past. Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.

Recipes

Radicchio is a little different taste for many folks. Here are a few recipes to try it out... it's a little bitter so a nice sweet dressing may help the flavor if it's too strong!
Risotto con radicchio
Serves: 4‑6
1 head radicchio plus extra greens if desired
1/2 cup finely chopped white onion
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
5 Tbsp. unsalted butter
6‑7 cups vegetable broth
1 cup dry white wine (or red is great with the radicchio)
1/2 cup freshly grated Italian Parmesan


Radicchio-Cabbage Slaw with Honey
Cabbage and radicchio get the sweet-treatment, thanks to honey. This should be a quick dish!
3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Freshly ground pepper
1 medium head napa cabbage (about 1 pound), halved lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips
2 small heads radicchio (about 8 ounces), halved lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips
Whisk together honey, vinegar, and salt in a small bowl. Add oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking until well blended. Season with pepper. Toss together cabbage and radicchio in a large bowl. Add dressing; toss to combine. Cover, and refrigerate at least 5 minutes. Just before serving, toss again.
Slaw can be refrigerated in an airtight container up to 1 day.

Treviso Radicchio Salad with Walnut Vinaigrette
Aged pecorino Toscano cheese is fairly hard; young pecorino Toscano is softer and milder. You can use good-quality provolone cheese instead, if you like.
8 thin slices pancetta (about 4 ounces)
3 heads Treviso radicchio (about 1 1/2 pounds), quartered lengthwise
1/2 cup walnut oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 cup champagne vinegar
2/3 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 ounces shaved young pecorino
Toscano cheese
Heat a medium skillet over medium-low heat; arrange pancetta in skillet in a single layer. Cook, turning occasionally, until crisp, about 12 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Break into 1-inch pieces.
Put radicchio in a large bowl. Add oil to skillet; heat over medium heat. Add shallots; immediately remove skillet from heat. Whisk in vinegar, walnuts, salt, and pepper; pour over radicchio. Toss well. Top with pancetta and cheese.
Bandh Gobhi Ki Sabzi (Buttered Smothered Cabbage)
Here's a traditional cabbage dish that will be great using the Savoy cabbage.
1 savoy cabbage (1-3/4 to 2 lbs)
2 Tbl ghee, butter or oil
1-1/2 tsp cumin seeds
1/4 tsp ground asafoetida (optional)
1/4 tsp turmeric
1 Tbl minced ginger root or 1/2 tsp dry
1 8 oz can tomato sauce or 1 cup chopped fresh ripe tomato (1 large)
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper or 1-2 seeded and minced green chilies
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup hot water
1-2 Tbl coarsely chopped fresh coriander leaves or 1 Tbl dry (optional)
Cut the cabbage into quarters, and core out the stem from each quarter. Shred the cabbage into 1/2-inch thick shreds. Heat the oil over med-high heat in a large heavy-bottomed pan. When the oil is hot, add cumin. When cumin turns dark brown (10-15 sec), add asafoetida (if using it), and immediately add the shredded cabbage. Sprinkle turmeric over the cabbage and sauté, turning and tossing rapidly until cabbage is wilted (about 5 min).
Add ginger, tomato (sauce), and chilies or red pepper, and continue cooking for an additional 5 min. Add salt and water. Reduce heat to med-low and cook the cabbage, covered, until it is tender and the water is absorbed into the vegetables (about 20 min). Check and stir often while it is cooking to prevent burning. Fold in coriander leaves, check for salt, and serve.
Scalloped Celeriac and Potatoes

Serves 6
butter for greasing the baking dish
1 pound celeriac, peeled, halved, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
1 pound baking potatoes, peeled, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated Gruyère or domestic Swiss cheese, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons butter
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Place the celeriac and potatoes in alternating layers in the baking dish, seasoning every few layers with salt and pepper. At about the halfway point, add 1/3 cup cheese in an even layer; sprinkle with the thyme. Continue with the celeriac and potatoes, until you have used all of your slices (don’t go all the way to the top edge; leave a little room to allow the liquid to boil).
Pour the stock over the celeriac and potatoes. Dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 15 minutes more. Sprinkle the remaining 2/3 cup cheese over the top layer, add several grindings of fresh pepper, and bake until the cheese turns golden, about 15 minutes.
Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 20, 2019

Welcome to the Spring Good Eats CSA Season!


Carnivores mark your calendars - the first Meat Share delivery is March 6!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Shoots, Sorrel, Daikon Radish, Fingerling Potatoes, Gilfeather Turnips, Red Onions, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Sweet Peppers

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Shoots, Parsley, Gilfeather Turnips, Rutabaga, Russet Potatoes, Red Onions, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Sweet Peppers

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Champlain Orchards Yoinashi Pears: This Asian pear variety was grown by Champlain Orchards in Shoreham. They are grown for their storage longevity, crisp and juicy taste, and flavor reminiscent of butterscotch! Store in the fridge for several weeks.
Mcfarline Apiaries Honey: The honey this week is from Mcfarline Apiaries in Benson, VT. This raw honey has never been heated or filtered. It is extracted and allowed to settle in the bottling tank where after 1 -2 days most of the wax, propolis, and pollen float to the surface. Then, they bottle what is on the bottom. If you notice small particles on the top layer of your honey, this is just pollen, propolis, and/or wax, which only add to the therapeutic qualities of raw honey. It is unnoticeable while eating. Honey is extremely versatile. Use it in teas or with hot lemon water, as part of a glaze, when making granola, in baking, drizzle some on your yogurt, slather it on buttered toast, serve it on a cheese platter next to some plums... the possibilities are quite endless. (If you want to read more about propolis and bees, Tim Mcfarline has great info on his blog. Click on the website link above.)
Meunerie Milanaise Unbleached Flour: Just over the border in Compton, Quebec, Lily Vallières and Robert Beauchemin, owners of La Meunerie Milanaise,began producing organic cereal grains on their farm in Quebec's Eastern Townships in 1977. They are committed to sourcing their flours locally, and their partner farms grow varieties of wheat that are adapted for our climate. Their innovation and success has been important for bakeries in our region who wish to purchase local organic flours appropriate for making artisan breads. The organic Unbleached White Flour in your share this week, made with Quebec winter wheat, is a perfect all-purpose flour, great for breads and other baked goods.​
Cheese Share Harbison from the Cellars at Jasper Hill is named for Anne Harbison, affectionately known as the grandmother of Greensboro, who died last year. Along with breathtaking views, traditions and people are part of what makes Vermont's working landscape special; they're proud to honor Ms. Harbison's legacy with this cheese. Harbison is a soft-ripened cheese with a rustic, bloomy rind. Young cheeses are wrapped in strips of spruce cambium, the tree's inner bark layer, harvested from the woodlands of Jasper Hill. The spoonable texture begins to develop in our vaults, though the paste continues to soften on the way to market. Harbison is woodsy and sweet, balanced with lemon, mustard, and vegetal flavors. If the bark has fused with the outer rind, leave the bark intact and spoon out portions from the top. Don't be afraid of the greenish bluish mold on the outside- this is normal and can be peeled off or eaten around. Enjoy!

Around the Farm

This weekend I attended the NOFA Winter Conference. NOFA is the body that oversees Vermont Organic Farmers - the organization that certifies our produce organic. Yesterday as I was processing CSA checks, I saw the quote below that our member Gracie included on her envelope.
Growing organic food is only part of our mission. We often go above and beyond organic standards because we value ecological stewardship. For us, that means practicing intense crop rotation, cover cropping, beneficial pest management, being solar powered, etc. Indeed, we have to. Organic is a great place to start and organizations like NOFA make it possible for us and other farmers, gardeners, and food enthusiasts to keep in touch with the world of organic growing, be it vegetables, flowers, herbs, animals, or even soil (yes, we grow soil!). But we also know that the current state of our environment is at a crucial, critical, and potentially unalterable crisis.
Even with that gloom always present, it was inspiring to be among so many folks from Vermont and Northern New England, and to connect with fellow organic growers and food producers who are all actively working towards similar goals. When you make the choice to buy and eat organic food, you are making a conscious effort to cherish what remains of our earth. Not all of our buying habits have that same power, so thank you!
~Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A mix of spinach, sorrel, claytonia, upland cress, baby kale, and shoots. We pre-wash the bagged greens but we recommend giving them a good rinse before using. Unopened, the bags of greens will last several days. Once opened, they will begin to wilt.
Gilfeather Turnips: The gilfeather turnip was bred here in Vermont and is our State Vegetable! Here is an excerpt from the Slow Food site about Gilfeathers: "The Gilfeather is an egg-shaped, rough-skinned root, but unlike its cousins, it has a mild taste that becomes sweet and a creamy white color after the first frost. While the hardy Gilfeather turnip does well in nearly any climate, this touch of frost contributes to its unusual taste and texture. Developed and named after John Gilfeather from Wardsboro, Vermont, this turnip is one of the state's unique contributions to cold weather agriculture. Mr. Gilfeather carefully guarded his stock to ensure that no one else could propagate the vegetable. However, some seeds slipped by and a few folks have continued to grow the Gilfeather Turnip after Mr. Gilfeather died." These turnips are truly unique, and we are fortunate that the seeds made their way to other Vermont farmers. Try boiling and mashing the Gilfeathers with potatoes. Turnips can be kept for a couple of weeks loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Fingerling Potatoes:  Cut these sought after little delicacies into 1 1/2 inch chunks, toss liberally with oil and salt and roast in a 400F oven until crispy and golden at the edges. Just beautiful. Store in a cool dry place away from onions.
Daikon Radish: lthough daikon radishes are actually members of the far-flung cabbage family, they look like overgrown white carrots and taste like mild radishes. Unchecked, daikon radishes have been known to weigh in at 50 pounds. Since daikon radishes are milder in flavor than regular radishes, they can be used like any other root vegetable in cooking. Wrap the unwashed root in a separate plastic bag and place it in the refrigerator, where it will keep for up to two weeks. There usually is no need to peel daikon radishes but if there are dark splotches on them, peel the splotches away. Wash them thoroughly in cold running water to remove any lingering dirt. Slice, dice, chop, or grate the daikon according to the directions of your recipe.
Parsley: Not only is it a greenhouse delicacy, but it has lots of benefits: many claim that flat-leaf parsley has more flavor than curly but all parsley has huge nutritional benefits - high in vitamins A, C, and K, and in folic acid (great for pregnant women!). The activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a "chemoprotective" food, meaning it can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens. Try adding parsley stems to your simmering stock, both to impart flavor and help clarify the broth. It can be sprinkled an a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetables sautes, and grilled fish. It can be a rub for chicken lamb, and beef when combined with garlic, lemon zest, and salt. It's a key flavor ingredient in the Mediterranean dish tabouli (see recipe below). A nice way to store is to place the parsley bunch stems in a glass of water, like flowers in a vase, and then cover loosely with a plastic bag and keep in the fridge. If this is too finicky, just store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in crisper drawer.
Rutabaga: Rutabaga grows particularly well in colder climates, and is especially popular in Sweden (where it earned its second name, swede).  Rutabagas should be peeled before use. Some rutabagas may have come out of the ground with superficial worm track markings. Don't be deterred if your rutabagas have these marks. Just peel or slice off the outer layer (which you need to do anyway) and the inside should be just fine. Keep them loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your fridge and they'll last for several weeks at least. Roast it, mash it with butter, season with salt and pepper, cook it like a fry, you can't go wrong.
Frozen Sweet Peppers: At the height of the season this summer, we stowed away the most gorgeous crop of sweet peppers for Good Eats. We will be giving them out periodically through the share. Leave peppers in the freezer til you are ready to use them. Then take out the peppers you will use for the dish you are making, and cut them as required for your recipe while they are still frozen, or just starting to thaw. As they thaw they will soften and become harder to chop neatly. These peppers can be used in any recipe that calls for cooking peppers. Chop them and toss them onto a pizza, or into a pasta dish, in a casserole, or alongside onions when grilling your meats. You will find many uses for them once you get used to pulling them from the freezer.

Recipes

Root Vegetable Mulligatawny
If you do not have all of the spices on hand, just use a couple tablespoons of your favorite curry powder.
1 cup dried red lentils
1 Tbsp. coconut oil
½ tsp. mustard seeds
1 Tbsp. curry leaves (about 15)
½ Tbsp. turmeric
¼ tsp. cayenne
½ Tbsp. coriander
½ tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. minced ginger
2 small onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 red bell pepper, diced
6 cups diced mixed root vegetables (carrots, sweet potato, celeriac, parsnips, turnips, daikon, kohlrabi, sunchokes etc.)
1 cup cooked chickpeas (optional)
1 14oz. can diced tomatoes
1 14oz. can coconut milk
2 cups vegetable broth
1 Tbsp. tamarind paste dissolved in ½ cup water (or juice of ½ lemon)
Fresh cilantro, for garnish
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
Cover lentils with water to soak while you prepare the rest of the dish. In a large stockpot, heat the oil and add all spices and minced ginger (not the garlic). Stir often so spices do not burn. When the mix smells fragrant, add onions and cook until softened (if the mix becomes too dry, add a little of the tomato liquid and stir well). Add garlic and cook a couple minutes more.
Add the chopped vegetables and stir well to coat with spices. Cook for 5 minutes. Add chickpeas, if using, and cook until heated through. Add canned tomatoes and coconut milk.
Drain and rinse lentils very well and add them to the pot, along with the vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to simmer. Cook for 20-30 minutes until the lentils are soft and the root vegetables tender.
Add tamarind (or lemon juice) to the soup. Season to taste.
Garnish soup with fresh cilantro and some quality olive oil. Serve hot. Tastes amazing the day after!
Cider Scalloped Gilfeather Turnips         
2 tablespoons flour                                                                    
1 cup apple cider or juice                    
½ teaspoon salt                                            
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, ground                            
½ cup Jarlsberg cheese, shredded    
1 cup milk
½ cup chicken broth                                                                                        
¼ teaspoon black pepper, ground
½ cup Vermont cheddar cheese, shredded
2 lbs. Gilfeather turnips, peeled and thinly sliced
Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Put oven rack in center position. Grease 10 x 2 round baking dish or an 8 x 10 rectangular baking dish; set aside. Place flour in a medium heavy saucepan; gradually add milk, whisking until smooth. Whisk in cider, broth, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Bring mixture to a boil over high heat, whisking constantly. Cook one minute more, remove from heat and set aside.
Combine cheeses. Arrange half of the sliced turnips (slightly overlapping) in prepared baking dish. Sprinkle half of cheeses on half of the turnips. Arrange another layer of turnips on top of cheese. Pour cider mixture over turnips. Bake 25 minutes. Remove baking dish from oven. Using a metal spatula, press down on the turnips. Sprinkle with remaining cheese and return to oven. Bake until turnips are fork-tender and the top is crusted and lightly browned – about 20 minutes more. Let stand 20 minutes before serving.
Roasted Rutabaga
Roasting rutabagas brings out their natural sweetness. You could easily bulk up this recipe by adding chopped potatoes, carrots, and any other root veggies you've got.
Rutabaga
Olive Oil
Salt
Pepper
Apple cider vinegar
Chopped Parsley
Toss 1 large peeled and cubed rutabaga with 3 tablespoons olive oil, and salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Roast at 425 degrees F until golden and soft, 40 minutes. Toss with 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and chopped parsley.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 13, 2019

Welcome to the Spring Good Eats CSA Season!

We're so glad you're here! I'm Taylar, the CSA Manager at Pete's Greens. Every week, you'll hear from me about your veggie (and pantry) deliveries. Please keep an eye out for this newsletter, which will arrive in your inbox on Tuesdays. Sometimes it will illuminate extra pickup details. If there is bad weather or something happens on the road, we communicate via email. Please note: today's snowstorm may impact tomorrow's delivery. Please watch your email for delivery updates! Thank you!
A few reminders...
  • When you pick up your share each week, please check the list for what items you are supposed to take. We only send enough for each member on the list, no extras.
  • Please pick up your share during the advertised pick-up hours.
  • If you are splitting a share or someone else is picking up for you, make sure they understand the pick-up instructions!
  • Cross your name off the list -- this helps us solve mysteries at the end of the day!
  • If anything is missing or you have problems with pick-up, email me at goodeats@petesgreens.com.
Interested in adding on to your share? Contact me before next week's delivery.
Thanks for joining -- and we'd love your help in spreading the word about our CSA! There's still room to join.
~ Taylar

Carnivores mark your calendars - the first Meat Share delivery is March 6!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE or ORANGE)

Spinach, Shoots, Cilantro OR Parsley, Garlic, Arrowhead Cabbage, Chioggia Beets, Sunchokes, Carrots, Gold Potatoes, and Shallots

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Arrowhead Cabbage, Carrots, Gold Potatoes, Yellow Onions, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Squash Puree

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Red Hen Baguette: Red Hen Baking Co in Middlesex baguettes this week!
Pete's Greens Baba Ganoush: Baba ganoush is a thick mediterranian spread made from our own organic eggplant, garlic, tahini, oil, lemon, and spices. It is great as a dip or on sandwiches, or use it as a rub for meat. You can liven it up after thawing by draining any excess water. Add a sprinkle of fresh green herbs, like parsley, as a garnish.
Lazy Lady Farm cheese: My tradition for the Spring share, which is always right on or near Valentine's Day, is to send out Oh My Heart from my friend Laini Fondillier. This is a brie style cow cheese with a bloomy rind. This rich cheese would be great spread on crackers or bread.  Laini makes small batches of some pretty fantastic cheese at her Lazy Lady Farm in Westfield. The farm is named after her pampered herd of goats, not Laini. Laini herself is a force to be reckoned with as she works her off-the-grid farm and cares for the goats and other animals, and makes all sorts of cheeses. 
Eggs: From Axel's Eggs in Greensboro! Happy, healthy hens make healthy, yummy eggs!
Cheese Share members are receiving Laini's Buck Hill Sunrise - a winter cow's milk cheese made with organic cow milk. It is a very supple textured cheese that is ripened 3-4 week and brushed several times before being wrapped. B linens as well as geotrichum and penicillium candidum is added to the milk to giving the rind and the cheese a lovely, nutty flavor. 5-7 oz., Bloomy Rind, aged 4 weeks, pasteurized Brie style / rich. It's only available through April!
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A winter blend of spinach, red sorrel, green sorrel, claytonia, and shoots. We pre-wash the bagged greens but we recommend giving them a good rinse before using. Unopened, the bags of greens will last several days. Once opened, they will begin to wilt.
Chioggia Beets: An Italian variety, chioggias have alternating white and pink rings of color on the inside. The outside is lighter and more pinkish than traditional red beets. They are smooth and mild tasting. To prevent chioggias from bleeding their color, roast them whole then slice crosswise to show off the beautiful rings. Roasted this way, they make a stunning addition to a salad. 
Garlic: As usually happens this time of year, we have lots of small garlic heads. You'll find a small one or two in your purple bags.
Arrowhead Cabbage: The pointed cabbage in your bags this week is Arrowhead, mellower in flavor than other storage cabbages, and can be used in all kinds of way. Arrowhead cabbage is most similar to green cabbage, but you can use in many other cabbage recipes too. It's pretty versatile. Make slaw, your favorite cabbage dish, or quarter it and drizzle olive oil on it, sprinkle with salt, and grill it. Add a little teriyaki sauce if you like. Yum.
Sunchokes: Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes make their debut in the large share this week! You might know of this plant as a beautiful yellow flower on tall stalks that blooms in summer. The tuberous roots, which appear in your shares, are also edible. Eat with or without the skin, and prepare as you would potatoes: roast, saute, bake, boil, or steam. They can be stored for a few weeks in your fridge.
Shallots are a member of the allium family being similar to both garlic and onions. They grow in cloves similar to garlic and have a sweet, mild flavor like a sweet or Spanish onion. They are well known for their ability to be caramelized or cooked down to where the sugars are reduced or concentrated. When eaten raw, they are much sweeter and milder than even sweet onions. You can slice them thin and saute them in recipes that benefit from a sweet, mild onion flavor. When minced, they are fantastic in homemade vinaigrette and pan sauces. Store them in a cool, dark place.
Frozen Squash Puree: Standard share members should pick up a package of frozen squash puree! This squash is grown at High Mowing Seeds for its seeds (called "Honeynut"). After the seeds are extracted, we chop it up, cook it down, puree it, and bag it. It's a great way to use the flesh of the squash and enjoy this crop during this time of year. It's great for throwing into sauces (check out the macaroni and cheese recipe below), serving as a side dish, or baking into a pie or bread.

Recipes

Pickled Cabbage
Here's a quick and easy way to make "pickled" cabbage. This would be great on top of a burger, or just eaten as a side dish.
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 shredded cabbage, shredded (about 3 cups)
1 cup thinly sliced onion
2 teaspoons coriander seeds, coarsely crushed in resealable plastic bag with mallet
1 teaspoon celery seeds
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
Heat vegetable oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add cabbage, sliced onion, crushed coriander seeds, and celery seeds; sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper and sauté until wilted and crisp-tender, about 6 minutes. Stir in white wine vinegar and sugar. Sauté until all liquid is absorbed, about 30 seconds.
Simple Braised Potatoes
Mark Bittman recently wrote an article for the NY Times all about Yukon Golds. This recipe for braised potatoes is very easy yet delicious. 
2 pounds potatoes
3 tbsp Butter
1 Onion, ciced
1 tsp Garlic, minced
A sprig of thyme or rosemary
2 cups Stock - chicken or veggie
Cut spuds into chunks. Heat butter in a deep skillet or broad pot over medium high heat; add potatoes, onion, garlic and the thyme or rosemary. Cook, stirring, until potatoes begin to turn golden, about 10 minutes. Add stock to barely cover the potatoes. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender and liquid is reduced, about 30 minutes. Garnish with thyme or rosemary.
Simple Baked Arrowhead Cabbage
Here's a nice, easy side dish that showcases these lovely cabbages.
1 Arrowhead Cabbage, cut in two lengthwise
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Chopped Scallions
Grated Parmesan
Place the cabbage halved on a baking sheet or in a glass baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and chopped scallions. Roast for 20-30 minutes at 350 degrees. Remove from oven, sprinkle with grated parm and return to oven to bake a few more minutes until cheese is lightly browned.
The result was very light and lovely without any of the heaviness sometimes associated with cabbage. The best description of the taste I can come up with is buttery crunch — not at all tough, but a velvety texture. Mild, sweet, delicious.
Broiled Beet Slices with Maple-Teriyaki Sauce
These beets are irrestible!
12 small or 6 medium beets, scrubbed, trimmed
1/4 cup butter
2 tbsp maple syrup
1 tbsp minced or pressed garlic (about 6 cloves)
 1 tbsp finely chopped or grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp soy sauce or tamari
Preheat the oven to 400F. Place beets in a small roasting pan with 1/2 cup water. Cover with foil and bake until beets are easily pierced with a sharp knife, 45 minutes to 1 hour (depending on size).
Preheat the broiler. Allow beets to cool slightly, then run under cold water and slip off their skins. Slice into 1/4 inch rounds. Melt the butter in a small pan over medium heat. Stir in the maple syrup, garlic, ginger, and soy sauce or tamari. When the ingredients are thoroughly combined, remove from heat.
Put the beets in a shallow baking pan and pour the maple syrup mixture over them. Broil, stirring occasionally, until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.
Creamy, light butternut squash macaroni and cheese
I found this one in our archives and the description read: “This recipe was a hit with the kids.” Who are we kidding? Macaroni and cheese is great at any age! I love it anytime and with any kind of veggie variety!
3 cups cubed peeled butternut squash OR 1- 2 pound package of squash puree
1 1/4 cups chicken or broth
1 1/2 cups milk
2 garlic cloves, peeled
2 tablespoons plain yogurt
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 1/4 cups (5 ounces) shredded Gruyère cheese (note: I never have cheese this fancy... use your favorite kind of melting cheese, like colby, mozzarella, or most cheddars)
1 cup (4 ounces) grated pecorino Romano cheese
1/4 cup (1 ounce) finely grated fresh Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, divided
1 pound uncooked cavatappi, elbows, or rotini
Cooking spray
1 teaspoon olive oil
1/2 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
Preheat oven to 375°.
Combine squash, broth, milk, and garlic in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium, and simmer until squash is tender when pierced with a fork, about 25 minutes. Remove from heat.
Place the hot squash mixture in a blender. Add salt, pepper, and yogurt. Remove the center piece of blender lid (to allow steam to escape); secure blender lid on blender. Place a clean towel over opening in blender lid (to avoid splatters). Blend until smooth. Place blended squash mixture in a bowl; stir in Gruyère, pecorino Romano, and 2 tablespoons Parmigiano-Reggiano. Stir until combined.
Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain well. Add pasta to squash mixture, and stir until combined. Spread mixture evenly into a 13 x 9-inch glass or ceramic baking dish coated with cooking spray.
Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add panko, and cook for 2 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from heat; stir in remaining 2 tablespoons Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. Sprinkle evenly over the hot pasta mixture. Lightly coat topping with cooking spray.
Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until bubbly. Sprinkle with parsley, and serve immediately.
Butternut Squash Ginger Carrot Soup
1 butternut squash or 1 package of frozen squash puree
6 carrots
4 cloves garlic
1 thumb size piece (or larger) of fresh ginger
1 onion
1 qt stock (veg or chicken)
water
olive oil
salt & pepper
(optional - cream, milk, sour cream, or coconut milk)
Cover the bottom of a large stock/soup pot with oil and add diced onion and a bit of salt on low heat. Cook 5-10 minutes until the onion becomes translucent. Add garlic and ginger with salt and pepper to taste and cook another 5 min so the flavors blend. Peel, seed and cut the butternut squash into large chunks. Wash and cut the carrots into large chunks as well. Add the stock to the soup pot, then the carrots and squash, then add water to barely cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil and then simmer until the carrots are tender. Using a potato masher, crush the cooked veg then blend to your preference. I usually like to blend half leaving some of the mashed carrots and squash for some texture. At this point you can stir in something creamy if desired. I used about half a can of coconut milk recently and thought it was perfect. If using sour cream, add it into the serving bowl as a garnish.
Pan-Fried Jerusalem Artichokes in Sage Butter
3 tablespoons butter, divided
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound Jerusalem artichokes,* scrubbed, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
3 tablespoons coarsely torn fresh sage leaves, divided
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
Melt 1 tablespoon butter with olive oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add Jerusalem artichokes and half of sage. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sauté until brown and just beginning to soften, turning frequently, about 10 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer Jerusalem artichokes to shallow serving bowl. Add remaining 2 tablespoons butter and sage to skillet; fry until sage darkens and begins to crisp, about 30 seconds. Add lemon juice; simmer 1 minute. Pour lemon-sage butter over Jerusalem artichokes in bowl, tossing to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with parsley.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com