Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - August 29, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Greens, Cilantro, Chard, Garlic, Cucumber, Radish, Celery, Eggplant, Carrots, Onions
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Tomato
6 ears Sweet Corn
1 Watermelon

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Mesclun, Garlic, Beans, Chard, Napa Cabbage, Carrots, Yellow Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Mesclun, Dill, Garlic, Poblano Peppers, Fennel, Leeks, Eggplant,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn
1 Watermelon

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Greens, Sweet Peppers, Chard, Carrots
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes



Around the Farm
...And just like that, summer is closing in on us! Of course it's still warm and most of the trees are still green and we're just getting into the height of our peppers but the cool nights and first days of school remind us that summer is waning. I enjoyed the final Bread and Puppet show on Sunday and saw the beautiful field of rye that the troupe is growing.
Last week we started to harvest our storage carrots and our onions. Potatoes are next! If you love these and other root veggies, you'll love our Fall/ Winter Share! But did I mention - we're still getting our peppers in, tomatillos haven't quite arrived yet, our field tomatoes are just about ready, and we still have more "summer veggies" bursting onto the scene!
The "summer" eating continues even though our Good Eats calendar says "Fall"! This is a great time to be a CSA member!
~Taylar
Only 5 weeks left of Summer!
Summer Good Eats, that is! Our Fall/ Winter Share starts on October 10. You can sign up today to reserve your spot!
We're offering our Localvore/ Fancy and Everyday Standard shares all season long. Our Lean & Green Share is guaranteed for 11 weeks, from October - December.
The Pantry Share is a great way to stock up on local and organic ingredients for holiday cooking and baking!
We have a few delivery site changes for this season - unfortunately Dedalus is not available this fall but we hope to bring back Johnson! Check back for more info.
The week of December 25 is our one week of the year of rest for the farm, so this season is 17 deliveries over 18 calendar weeks.
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Greens: This week, yellow and purple bag shares are receiving mesclun. Orange bags are receiving either mesclun or spinach. Green shares are receiving either spinach or braising mix (it won't have lettuce in it).
Garlic: We've harvested all our garlic for the season! This garlic is slightly cured - meaning it's had some time to dry out and cure, but hasn't cured completely. If you store it in the fridge, you'll need to use it a little sooner. You can also store it on your kitchen counter, where it's likely to be drier and will help the curing process along. Fresh garlic will have a stronger, more pungent fragrance. Whichever way you choose to store it is fine.
Bunched Carrots: Bunched carrots are a tasty snack, and we're closing in on the last of them for the season! I had to do some product testing so I can verify these carrots are delicious. They're freshly harvested and washed. We're sending them with the greens on; more adventurous cooks will appreciate the opportunity for creativity with the carrot greens, which are totally edible! You can cook them/ saute them as you would any other green, but they are more bitter than most greens. They also make a nice pesto or addition to a fresh greens salad. You may also choose to just cut them off and compost them. We decided to leave them on for this week because only too soon, we'll be harvesting our carrots for storage, which means we have to trim off the greens out of necessity. It seems too soon to lose this nice pop of summer with the greens. Store carrots in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer for the longest shelf life. Here are some ideas for using carrots: eat carrots raw, add them to yogurt with mint for an Indian raita, grate them and add into banana and other quick breads or muffins, add to stir fries and fried rice dishes, make them into a soup, or turn them into pickles. 
Leeks: Leeks are a member of the allium family, a type of onion. For cooking, use just the white and light green parts. A bit of investigation reveals that the light green color extends farther up the stalk on the interior of the leek. Thus, to prepare the leek, cut off the dark green sections leaf by leaf, working your way towards the center of the stalk. To clean the leek, cut it lengthwise from just above the root end all the way up through the top, making sure to keep the root end in tact. Turn the leek a quarter turn, then repeat. You'll end up with four long sections of leek still joined together at the root. Now, swish the leek around in a tub or bowl of cold water, keeping the root end higher than the stem, so that the dirt flows out the "top" of the leek. Once thoroughly rinsed, cut the leek for your recipe as desired. To store, loosely wrap unwashed leeks in a plastic bag and keep in your crisper drawer.
Poblano Peppers: Poblano peppers are nice when stuffed or charred over the grill (or, in a pinch, over a burner of a gas oven). They get a nice blackening that you scrape off before using - try sauteing with other peppers for some enchiladas. Poblanos can be hot, or they can be mild. The spiciness varies from pepper to pepper. Red poblanos in particular tend to be spicier, but these are a nice deep green. They're good for stuffing or for mixing in with other peppers. Peppers don't like extreme cold, so store in a paper bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge.
Celery: Not your conventional grocery store celery!
Fennel (half shares): crunchy and slightly sweet with the flavor of anise, fennel is delicious served raw but is just as often served cooked on its own or in other dishes. Though most often associated with Italian cooking, it has an uncanny ability to blend with other flavors adding a light and fresh note. It is delightful in soups and stews and sauces and is particularly at home with tomato sauce dishes. Fennel is composed of a white or pale green bulb from which closely superimposed stalks are arranged. To prepare, cut off the hard bottom and slice vertically or into quarters. Or cut the bulb in half lengthwise, cut out the core, and cut into strips. Add it raw to salads or try some thinly sliced fennel on your sandwich. Top thinly sliced fennel with plain yogurt and mint leaves. Or braise, roast or saute it. It is done when tender enough to pierce easily with a skewer. I love a good fennel with tomatoes over pasta. Cook down the fennel and onions and then add in the tomatoes. It becomes sort of this gooey dish full of flavor. There are lots of recipes out there; try experimenting with the heavenly taste of fennel and tomatoes!
Tomatoes: After an up and down last couple of weeks of tomato harvest, this week we have a bunch of tomatoes so we're sending out two pounds!

Featured Recipes

Spicy Eggplant and Green Bean Curry 
If you have coconut milk and some curry paste, here's a classic you can whip up quickly.  
5 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
4 garlic cloves, chopped 
1 tablespoon choppped peeled fresh ginger 
1 eggplant, peeled, cut into 1 x 2 pieces 
8 ounces green beans, trimmed, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 tablespoon lime zest
1 teaspoon thai green curry paste 
1 cup canned unsweetened coconut milk
3 green onions, chopped
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped* 
2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped* 
*The herbs are a nice addition but don't make or break the dish...  
In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 4 tablespoons oil. Add garlic and ginger, stirring 30 seconds. 
Add eggplant and green beans. cook until almost tender, stirring often, about 10 minutes. Cover and cook until completely tender, about 3 minutes longer. Transfer vegetables to bowl. In same skillet, add 1 tablespoon oil, lime peel, and curry paste; stir 15 seconds. Add coconut milk; bring to boil, whisking until smooth. 
Return vegetables to skillet; saute until sauce thickens enough to coat vegetables, about 3 minutes. Season with salt. Toss in onions, cilantro, and mint.
Chile Rellenos Poblanos
I’ve taken some liberties with this recipe and taken away the number of peppers, tomatoes, etc. that the official recipe calls for. Your tomato sizes and pepper sizes will all vary, so adjust the proportions according to your peppers. These are some large chiles so they will change your proportions.

Sauce:
Red tomatoes, cored and coarsely chopped
1 garlic clove, minced
1/3 cup chopped white onion
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Chiles:
1 - 1 1/2 cups Monterrey Jack cheese
1 tablespoon dried oregano
Poblano chiles, charred, seeded, and deveined *see Cook's Note
1 - 3 egg whites, at room temperature
1 egg yolk, at room temperature
All-purpose flour, for dredging
Vegetable oil, for frying

Sauce: Put the tomatoes, garlic and onion in a blender. Blend until smooth. In a medium saute pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sauce and simmer for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. 
Chile rellenos: Mix the cheese and oregano in a small bowl. Cut a slit through 1 side of the charred chiles and fill each chile with 1/4 cup of the cheese mixture. Close with toothpicks to hold the filling in place. In a medium bowl, using an electric hand mixer, beat the egg whites on high speed until soft peaks form. Add the egg yolk and continue to beat for about 1 minute. 

In a large heavy-bottomed saucepan, pour in enough oil to fill the pan about a third of the way. Heat over medium heat until a deep-frying thermometer inserted in the oil reaches 375 degrees F. (If you don't have a thermometer a cube of bread will brown in about 3 minutes.) Dredge the filled chiles in flour until fully covered. Shake off any excess flour, then dip the chiles into the egg mixture, until well coated. Fry until golden brown and drain on paper towels. 

Arrange the chiles on a serving platter, spoon the sauce on top and serve.
Cook's Note
To char the chiles (or any fresh chile): Put the chiles over a gas flame or underneath the broiler and cook until they are blackened on all sides. Enclose them in a plastic bag and let stand for 10 minutes to steam, which will make them easier to peel. Peel, stem, and seed the chiles. Once peeled, the chiles may be chopped, sliced or stuffed.

Napa Cabbage Salad with Peanuts and Ginger
This recipe from Martha Stewart is a great way to use your napa cabbage.
2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 piece fresh ginger (1 inch long), peeled and grated
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
coarse salt and ground pepper
1/2 medium napa cabbage (about 1 pound), cored and cut into bite-size pieces
1 red bell pepper (seeds and ribs removed), thinly sliced
1/4 cup chopped fresh, cilantro
1/4 cup chopped roasted peanuts
In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, mustard, ginger, and oils until dressing is smooth. Season with salt and pepper.
In a large bowl, combine cabbage, bell pepper, cilantro, and peanuts. Add dressing to taste, and toss to combine. Serve.
Tomato Fennel Salad

1 1/2 pounds heirloom tomatoes
1 small fennel bulb
2 tbsp good olive oil
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Core the tomatoes and cut into wedges. Remove the top of the fennel (save some fronds for garnish) and slice the bulb very thinly crosswise with a knife or on a mandoline.

Toss the tomatoes and fennel in a bowl with the olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Garnish with 2 tablespoons chopped fennel fronds, season to taste, and serve.
Green Beans and Tomatoes with Garlic, Cumin, and Ginger
Serves 4
10 cloves garlic, smashed
1 piece ginger (about 1 inch long), peeled, chopped
1 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable stock, divided
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 cup mild-flavored vegetable oil
2 teaspoons whole cumin seeds
1 whole dried red chile pepper (optional)
2 to 4 fresh tomatoes, stems removed, peeled, finely chopped
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 1/2 pounds green beans, cut in half (about 8 cups)
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 1 lemon)
freshly ground black pepper
1. Put the garlic, ginger, and 1/2 cup of the stock in a blender or a food processor; process until a smooth paste forms.
2. Place a large wok (or pot) over medium heat. When the wok is hot, add the ground cumin and toast it just until it is fragrant. (This will take only a few seconds -be very careful not to overtoast it, as it can burn quickly). Immediately scrape the cumin onto a small dish and set aside.
3. Quickly wipe the wok with a damp cloth or paper towel to remove any remaining spice. Return the wok to the heat; add the oil, let it heat up for about 20 seconds and then add the whole cumin seeds. After 5 seconds, add the dried chile pepper. After another 25 seconds (30 seconds total for the seeds, with or without the chile), add the ginger-garlic paste. Cook and stir the ingredients for 2 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and coriander. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes.
4. Add the green beans, salt, and the remaining stock. Stir the ingredients until they come to a gentle boil. Reduce the heat to low.
 

Pantry Lore 

We welcome back cornmeal this week! For years, our Pantry/ Localvore Share has featured organic Early Riser cornmeal from Butterworks Farm. The last few seasons, Butterworks has reduced its cornmeal processing. By popular demand, we worked with Nitty Gritty Grain Company out of Charlotte to bring you this blended cornmeal! Nitty Gritty is a certified organic grain farm. They grow two types of cornmeal, a coarser heirloom kind and a finer, more traditional kind. They also blend them together, which is what you're receiving today! The blend is versatile, great for cooking/ baking - try a homemade polenta (an Italian cornmeal dish). Store cornmeal in a cool place. I always keep a little out in a sealed jar and keep the rest in the freezer.
Fresh eggs from Besteyfield Farm in Hinesburg and Tangletown Farm in nearby West Glover.
And, miso from Les Aliments Massawippi just over the border in Quebec! Miso is a great flavoring to add to stir-fries or to flavor greens, potatoes, root veggies, and a variety of other side dishes. Owners of Les Aliments Massawippi Gilbert and Suzanne made the superb Soy Barley Miso in the share. The two are big supporters of local growers. Their oats come from Michel Gaudreau. Their soy beans come from a grower within 60 kilometers of their facility, and their Quebec barley is processed on the south shore of Montreal. To make this miso, Suzanne and Gilbert begin by introducing their own lactobacilli culture to washed barley. After culturing for 45 hours, they have what is called, "koji," the basis for making their miso. At this point, they will mix in soy that has been soaked and then slowly cooked for 20 hours. This part of the process takes around 4 days. The next phase of miso production is fermentation. Gilbert and Suzanne ferment their miso very carefully controlling the temperature, humidity and oxygen levels. Their fermentation chamber is on premises, and is held at a continuous 60F. The flavor is fresh and soft, almost sweet on the finish with some saltiness. As miso is a living food, it is best not to cook it. Instead, stir miso into a dish after it is removed from the heat to maintain it's nutritional benefits. Kept refrigerated, it will last several years. Please note: this is not gluten free.
This week's bread is the amazing olive loaf from Mansfield Breadworks! I love this - it doesn't even need anything on it! But you can dip it in olive oil for something extra special.
Cheese share members are receiving either Bayley Hazen Blue from the Cellars at Jasper Hill OR BEEP from Northwoods Creamery in Westfield. Northwoods is a fairly new creamery making hard sheep's milk cheese. Try this one like you would a romano (it's great for grating the longer it sits in the fridge). Fresh, it's lovely for munching. Either of these would greatly change the flavor of a polenta dish!
Polenta & Greens 
Here's a basic modifiable recipe for polenta with greens. 
1-2 bunches cooking greens (swiss chard, braising greens, spinach, kale etc) 
1 large onion, chopped 
2 garlic cloves, minced 
2 tbsp olive oil 
Dash red pepper flakes 
2 carrots, halved and sliced (optional) 
Italian seasoning herbs (optional)
Sliced shitake mushrooms (optional) 
1 c grated cheese, provolone, cheddar, fontina, even feta, as you like 
1 c polenta (coarse cornmeal) 
3 c water 
1 tsp salt 
Wash and chop the greens. Saute onion, garlic, and carrots and/or mushrooms in olive oil. Season with salt, pepper & red pepper and Italian herbs. Cook until browning and fragrant. Gradually add the greens, stir frying until all are incorporated and just wilted. 
Boil water & whisk in polenta & salt. Turn down very low, watch out for sputters. Cook until thick, stirring often. 
Brush a baking dish with olive oil. Pour in about 2/3 of polenta, spoon in the greens, top with remaining polenta & cheese. Take a butter knife and swirl through the top layers a bit. Bake @ 350 until bubbly and slightly browned, about 30 minutes. 
This recipe is easily doubled, which makes a generous 10 x 14 pyrex baking dish. The polenta is easier to work with if it is poured right when it thickens. If you wait it will set up into a more solid form. Prep the vegetables and have all ingredients ready before you cook the polenta, so it will be ready at the right time, as the greens take just a few minutes. 
Crown Pleasing Cornbread
Looking for something different for your kids' school lunchboxes? Try this cornbread! It's sweeter than most cornbreads, but well, that's not so bad. Perhaps some sweet corn kernels would add some nice texture!
Preheat oven to 400F.
Mix together:
1.5 cups cornmeal
1.5 cups flour
3/4 cup sugar (or 1/2 cup honey)
1 TB baking pwder
1 tsp salt

Then add:
2-3 TB melted butter
1.75 cups milk (or maybe 1.5 if using honey for sweetener)

Mix together, pour into a buttered 9 x 13 pan, and bake at 400F for 20-25 mins til knife comes out clean and golden brown around edges. 


Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - August 22, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Spinach, Basil, Garlic, Wax Beans, Red Cabbage, Bell Peppers, Broccoli, Red Norland Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Watermelon
6 ears Sweet Corn

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Spinach, Basil, Bell Peppers, Pac Choi, Zucchini, Red Norland Potatoes
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Spinach, Pac choi, Bell Peppers, Wax Beans, Cippolini Onions, Carrots, Red Norland Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Watermelon
4 ears Sweet Corn

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Spinach, Leeks, Broccoli,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes



Around the Farm

What a week! It's been busy around here - Saturday's Open Farm Day was an exciting day full of great food and tours! Pete led a few groups (one picture is below) and Sunday headed out for a week hiking with his family.
We have a lot of great stuff coming in; you'll find watermelons again this week and I'm hopeful we'll have cantaloupe soon. We're starting to harvest onions, potatoes, and carrots for the fall and getting greenhouse beds ready to turn over into fall planting. The garlic is all harvested and currrently curing for storage. The sweet corn is still coming in strong and looking much better - much less wormy. Sadly, our blueberries are done for the season. The stormy weather late last week took what was left of them. So long until next year!
Today I gave a tour to folks from the Ben & Jerry's Foundation, who are looking to grant Salvation Farms with funding to continue organizational capacity development; a fancy way of saying they'll give money to help the organization strategize into the future. Fun to show folks around our wash house on such a busy day. Tuesdays we pack out our wholesale orders and CSA orders. Wednesday we deliver all over northern Vermont and our produce goes down into NYC, too. It's our biggest day on the farm. All the crops come through our wash house where they're washed, prepped, packed, and staged for delivery. We harvest the greens in the morning and things are still coming in as late as 6:30! I've been working in the wash house with our crew so this newsletter is a little late, but I wanted to make sure to get you all the most current and correct info!
~Taylar

Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach:  A mix of tender baby spinach and hearty full spinach! Spinach is so wonderful as a salad or when sauteed. There are so many ways to eat it and it's so good for you, too! Packed full of iron.
Mixed Beans: Store in your fridge wrapped in plastic for up to 5 days. Try them braised, roasted, or grilled. Beans pair well with garlic, balsamic, and parmesan. You'll receive green, purple, or a mix!
Cippolini Onions:  Cippolini onions are a small flattened Italian onion with a sweet, mild flavor. Cippolinis are traditionally served roasted or baked, but also work well on kebabs or eaten fresh. If you have never eaten a roasted cippolini you must, as you will never think of onions the same way. The advantage of the cippolini is its mild flavor that when roasted caramelizes quickly into sweet, flavorful goodness! Their shape lends them well to roasting. Cippolini onions do not store as well as your typical onion. For short term storage keep in a cool, dry place or in the butter compartment of your fridge.
Red Norland Potatoes: These have a red outer skin and crisp white flesh inside. These are our summertime "new" potatoes. The best way to cook a Red Norland is to boil, steam or roast them. They make a great red potato salad with skin on, or toss with olive oil, garlic and herbs or go for it and smother them with good old butter (yum). They won't store well. We recommend keeping them in the fridge.
Basil: This marvelous herb is a member of the mint family. It is a staple in Mediterranean cooking as well as Thai, Vietnamese, and Laotian. The herb is highly aromatic, or put another way, the oils in basil are highly volatile. Thus, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process so it will retain its maximum essence and flavor. Basil should be kept in a plastic bag or kept stem-down in a glass of water with plastic over the leaves, for about a week with regular water changing. Keep your basil out of extreme cold as it could damage the fragile leaves.
Watermelon for Orange, Purple, and Green shares this week. Sweet and so yummy! Please take one and use within a couple days.

Featured Recipes

Sauteed Onions
Coarse salt
1 1/2 pounds cipollini onions, peeled
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
Bring 6 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan; add salt. Boil onions until softened, about 4 minutes. Drain, and pat dry. Set aside.
Heat butter and oil in a large saute pan over high heat, stirring to combine, until butter melts. Add onions, and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low; add thyme, and season with salt. Cover, and cook until onions are tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Serve warm.Coarse salt
1 1/2 pounds cipollini onions or small shallots, peeled
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
Bring 6 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan; add salt. Boil onions until softened, about 4 minutes. Drain, and pat dry. Set aside.
Heat butter and oil in a large saute pan over high heat, stirring to combine, until butter melts. Add onions, and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low; add thyme, and season with salt. Cover, and cook until onions are tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Serve warm.
Tangy Potato Salad with Scallions
This is a great basic potato salad recipe. If you have any fresh herbs on hand they would be amazing added in.  
Coarse salt and ground pepper
3 pounds potatoes, scrubbed, halved, and sliced 1/2 inch thick
1/2 cup white-wine vinegar
4 scallions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup olive oil
Set a steamer basket in a large pot. Fill with enough salted water to come just below basket. Bring to a boil; place potatoes in basket, and reduce heat to medium. Cover, and steam, gently tossing occasionally, until crisp-tender, 10 to 15 minutes.
Step 2
Meanwhile, combine vinegar and scallions in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper. When potatoes are cooked, transfer to bowl with vinegar mixture. Toss to combine; let cool, tossing occasionally.
Step 3
When potato mixture is cool, mix in oil; season potato salad with salt and pepper.
Curried Zucchini & Couscous
This quick, easy side dish is a great accompaniment to grilled meats. For a little sweetness throw in a handful of raisins with the carrots. From Eating Well, August 2013.
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 medium zucchini, diced
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 cup water
1 tbsp lime juice
1 tsp curry powder
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2/3 cup whole-wheat couscous, or barley!
1 cup grated carrot
1/4 cup slivered almonds, toasted
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add zucchini and onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until starting to soften, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl.
Add water, lime juice, curry, cumin, salt and pepper to the pan and bring to a boil. Stir in couscous. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork.
Add the couscous and carrot to the bowl with the zucchini; stir to combine. Serve topped with almonds.

 

Pantry Lore 

This week we have fresh pasta from Vermont Fresh Pasta, our own Sweet Basil Pesto, and fresh mozzarella from Maplebrook Farm! VT Fresh Pasta makes fresh pasta with organic, local flour. If you're not going to use within a week, please put in your freezer. Pete's Greens Pesto is made with our own organic basil, plus sunflower seeds, olive oil, salt, lemon juice, and two kinds of cheese. It's coming frozen; use fresh or put back into your freezer. Some ribbons of fresh basil atop your bowl of pasta adds a nice decoration. Maplebrook mozzarella is perfect for a Caprese salad! Just slice and layer tomatoes and mozzarella. Sprinkle some fresh basil and drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and salt & pepper. So simple but so delicious!

Fresh Mozz, Pesto, and Tomato Pizza

This is the quickest pizza ever. You could make it more zesty by adding some minced garlic aloing with the pesto. You could dress it up by topping it with some mesclun greens dressed in a simple vinaigrette. Or saute some zucchini or eggplant and peppers and onions in a pan for a while and add those too. You can't go wrong, there's just too many good things to put on top!

Olive oil

Pesto

a couple fresh tomatoes

torn fresh mozzarella

a little salt and pepper 
Optional - fresh garlic, minced
Brush your crust with the oil for the flavor. Place thin slices of tomatoes on the crust, and place dabs of pesto all about the crust on top of and around the tomatoes here and there. Some folks like to take the seeds out of their tomatoes so there's less tomato juice on the pizza. Then top with thin slices of the fresh mozz & tomatoes scattered about. I like a bit of salt and pepper on mine and sometimes I drizzle on a bit of really good balsamic. Bake until the cheese is bubbling and the crust is done. Simple and delicious.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - August 15, 2018

Join us this Saturday for our Open Farm Day!
Come see us at our farm, 266 S. Craftsbury Rd in Craftsbury Village. Look for the colorful farmstand!
More details below.


This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Mesclun, Garlic, Kale, Radishes, Zucchini, Mixed color Beans, Carrots, Red Beet Bunch, Red Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
6 ears Sweet Corn

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Mesclun, Cilantro, Garlic, Broccoli, Red Beet Bunch, Mixed color Beans, Red Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Watermelon
4 ears Sweet Corn

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Mesclun, Garlic, Kale, Cilantro, Jalapenos, Zucchini, Radish, Kohlrabi, Red Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
6 ears Sweet Corn

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Mesclun, Kale, Mixed Color Beans, Radish,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn

Bread Share

Mansfield Breadworks

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Farm Yogurt, Pete's Greens Blueberries, and Eggs

Cheese Share

Parish Hill Creamery
Idyll or Kashar

Around the Farm

This Saturday is our annual Open Farm Day! You're invited!! This is our free, open to the public fun-filled day! Activities kick off at 11 am with a light lunch provided by the Craftsbury Outdoor Center kitchen.
Join us for tours led by Pete and Isaac at 11:30 am and 1 pm.
Evan will be grilling up some delicious sausages made from the whey-fed and veggie-fed pigs that Pete's Greens & Jasper Hill raise through our project, VT99.
Our farmstand with its beautiful living roof will be well stocked and we have a volleyball net set up for some pick-up games of volleyball!
Come on out and see what our four-season veggie farm is like, and meet some of the Pete's Greens crew! We'll take you through greenhouses/ high tunnels, some fields, and our wash/ pack house.
This event is free and no reservations are needed. Make it a day and check out some of the other events happening during Kingdom Farm and Food Days and Vermont's Open Farm Week! See you at the farm this Saturday!
~Taylar

Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Sweet Corn: We have another round of sweet corn this week. As you open your corn this week, you may notice a few special guests. Every cornfield battles a corn borer worm at some point; this week, your corn is proof of our organic growing practices! We don't spray the corn to get rid of the worms like conventional farms so you may find some at the very top of your ears. Just cut off the top or brush off the worm and continue to enjoy! There is little harm done to the delicious part of the ear.
Mesclun:  A nice hearty blend of lettuces, chard, kale, cress, and mizuna this week! We wash the greens but recommend you give them a good rinse before eating. Store in a cold part of your fridge and use quickly.
Mixed Beans: Our crew found a patch of tri-color beans over the weekend! You're receiving a mix of green, purple, and yellow wax beans. Store in your fridge wrapped in plastic for up to 5 days. Try them braised, roasted, or grilled. Beans pair well with garlic, balsamic, and parmesan. You'll receive green, purple, or a mix!
Garlic and Red Onions:  A head of our newly harvested garlic crop! We upped our planting of garlic last fall and plan to send out garlic pretty regularly from here until it's gone! And, red onions for most shares. Both the onions and the garlic have been lightly cured; they've been drying out since they were harvested but have not dried out completely. We recommend storing both in the fridge if you won't use them up right away (within a week).
Jalapeno: Helpful advice when slicing jalapenos: use gloves when cutting or be very careful about what you touch after cutting! Jalapenos are a nice heat to add to a variety of dishes. Use all for a lot of heat or part for just a nice zing. Store the pepper in a paper bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.
Kohlrabi: Kind of tastes like broccoli and it packs the nutritional punch of the other members of the cruciferous veggies (broccoli, kale, cabbage), and when you cut it up into strips and cook it, it is completely unintimidating (it looks like apple slices or plain potato strips). So this makes it a veggie that is easy for even picky kids to try and often like. I also love it because it's versatile. It adds crunch and body to a salad, it's great tossed on grill in a drizzle of olive oil in roasting basket or tin foil, it's great as a side dressed up in a myriad of ethnic flavor profiles, and it's terrific in many dishes calling for a veggie melange. And to top it off, it stores a long time, so you can eat everything else in the fridge first and then 3 weeks later discover you still have perfect kohlrabi. To use it, cut off that tough colorful exterior. Then cut up the white part into whatever shape you like. Eat it raw or cook it up. Recipes below.
Watermelon for Yellow Bag shares this week!!! Sweet and so yummy! Please take one and use within a couple days.

Featured Recipes

Tomato and Corn Pie
This recipe came through Smitten Kitchen so I had to test it on Sunday. It was delicious! I think there's a little more room for adaptation here. I cleaned out my cheese drawer and use an herb and a spicy cheddar and feta. I had some scallions and used those, too, and herbs from my front porch - not basil and chives. It's a great way to use two summer favorites that we have in abundance - tomatoes and corn! The Smitten Kitchen recipe is adapted (barely) from Gourmet’s adaptation of Laurie Colwin’s and James Beard’s versions.
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 3/4 teaspoons salt, divided
3/4 stick (6 tablespoons or 3 ounces) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, plus 2 teaspoons melted
3/4 cup whole milk
1/3 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 3/4 pounds beefsteak tomatoes
1 1/2 cups corn (from about 3 ears), coarsely chopped by hand (my preference) or lightly puréed in a food processor, divided
2 tablespoons finely chopped basil, divided (skipped this, no harm was done)
1 tablespoon finely chopped chives, divided
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, divided
7ounces coarsely grated sharp Cheddar (1 3/4 cups), divided
Whisk together flour, baking powder, and 3/4 tsp salt in a bowl, then blend in cold butter (3/4 stick) with your fingertips or a pastry blender until it resembles coarse meal. Add milk, stirring until mixture just forms a dough, then gather into a ball.
Divide dough in half and roll out one piece on a well-floured counter (my choice) or between two sheets of plastic wrap (the recipe’s suggestion, but I imagined it would annoyingly stick to the plastic) into a 12-inch round (1/8 inch thick). Either fold the round gently in quarters, lift it into a 9-inch pie plate and gently unfold and center it or, if you’re using the plastic warp method, remove top sheet of plastic wrap, then lift dough using bottom sheet of plastic wrap and invert into pie plate. Pat the dough in with your fingers trim any overhang.
Preheat oven to 400°F with rack in middle. If your kitchen is excessively warm, as ours is, go ahead and put the second half of the dough in the fridge until you’re ready to use it. Whisk together mayonnaise and lemon juice.
Cut an X in bottom of each tomato and blanch in a large pot of boiling water 10 seconds. Immediately transfer with a slotted spoon to an ice bath to cool. Peel tomatoes, then slice crosswise 1/4 inch thick and, if desired (see Notes above recipe), gently remove seeds and extra juices. Arrange half of tomatoes in crust, overlapping, and sprinkle with half of corn, one tablespoon basil, 1/2 tablespoon chives, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper and one cup of grated cheese. Repeat layering with remaining tomatoes, corn, basil, chives, salt, and pepper. Pour lemon mayonnaise over filling and sprinkle with remaining cheese.
Roll out remaining piece of dough into a 12-inch round in same manner, then fit over filling, folding overhang under edge of bottom crust and pinching edge to seal. Cut 4 steam vents in top crust and brush crust with melted butter (2 teaspoons). Bake pie until crust is golden and filling is bubbling, 30 to 35 minutes, then cool on a rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Do ahead: Pie can be baked 1 day ahead and chilled. Reheat in a 350°F oven until warm, about 30 minutes.

Grilled Beans
1/2 small red onion, vertically sliced
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 pound green beans, trimmed
1 tbsp canola oil
1 tsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp dark sesame oil
1/8 tsp kosher salt
1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Preheat grill to medium-high heat.
Place a grill basket on hot grill; preheat for 5 minutes.
Place onions, garlic, and green beans in a large bowl. Drizzle with canola oil; toss well to coat. Arrange mixture in hot grill basket; cover grill, and cook 7 minutes or until beans are lightly charred, tossing occasionally. Place bean mixture in a large bowl; cover and let stand 5 minutes. Add soy sauce and remaining ingredients; toss to combine.
Scalloped Kohlrabi 
3 small kohlrabi
2 tablespoons lard (or other fat), melted
coarse ground sea salt, to taste
1/4-1/3 cup fresh organic curly parsley, chopped
4 tablespoons unsalted grass-fed butter
Preheat the oven to 350°F.
Chop the ends off the kohlrabi and peel. Thinly slice each kohlrabi.
Place a single layer of kohlrabi in the bottom of an 8x8 glass baking dish. Drizzle the melted lard over the kohlrabi slices. Sprinkle with sea salt and fresh chopped parsley. Continue to layer sliced kohlrabi, drizzle of lard and sprinkled with sea salt and parsley until you run out of kohlrabi slices. Finish with a sprinkle of sea salt and parsley on top.
Cover the dish with foil and transfer to the oven. Bake covered for 30 minutes. Uncover the dish, add butter and bake uncovered for an additional 30 minutes.
Remove from oven and serve.

Broccoli Fritters
6-7 broccoli stems, shredded (about 1.5-2 cups)
2 eggs, whisked
1 3/4 cup almond meal
1/2 sweet onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon minced garlic
lots of salt and pepper
Send your broccoli stems through a shredder or food processor with the shredding attachment which made it go by super fast.
Add your shredded broccoli to a large bowl along with all other ingredients and mix well.
Heat up a large skillet over medium-high heat with a bit of fat in it. Use a large spoon and your hands to ball up a fritter and add to a skillet. It doesn't need to be flat, you'll flatten it out after you flip it.
Cook the fritter for about 3-4 minutes, then use a spatula to flip, then flatten out with the spatula. Cook for another 4 minutes or so.
Once the fritters are crisp on both sides, eat them.
Raw Kale and Kohlrabi Salad with Tahini-Maple Dressing
I haven't made this but I am going to. The original recipe was a Kale and Brussel Sprouts recipe but the kohlrabi will be a great substitution. Thinly sliced bkohlrabi and toasted slivered almonds will lend the crunch, while parmesan and miso will contribute savoriness. 
1 bunch of curly green kale
2 kohlrabi 
3 tablespoons sliced almonds
¼ cup shaved Parmesan (use a vegetable peeler to shave the cheese into little strips)
dash of sea salt
Tahini-maple dressing
¼ cup tahini
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 teaspoons white miso
2 teaspoons maple syrup
Pinch of red pepper flakes
¼ cup water
Strip the kale leaves from the ribs of the kale. Chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Sprinkle a dash of sea salt over the kale and use your hands to massage the kale by lightly scrunching handfuls of kale in your hands. Release and repeat until the kale becomes darker in color and more fragrant. Transfer the kale to a medium serving bowl.
Cut off the tough outer skin of your kohlrabi and then cut into matchsticks or other 1/4" thick shape.
In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the tahini, vinegar, miso, maple syrup and red pepper flakes. Whisk in the water until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Some brands of tahini are thicker than others, so if your dressing is too thick, add a bit more water and/or vinegar, to taste. Pour the dressing over the kale and sprouts and mix well.
In a small pan over medium heat, toast the almond slivers, stirring frequently, until fragrant and turning golden (this will take less than five minutes so watch carefully). Add the toasted almonds and parmesan shavings to the salad and toss. Serve immediately.
 

Pantry Lore 

Yogurt from Butterworks Farm in Westfield! This super yummy yogurt is made from grass-fed cows from the Lazor Family. It goes wonderfully when topped with some of our own organic blueberries!
And fresh eggs from Tangletown Farm (please note: Tangletown re-uses containers that may have another farm's name on them but rest assured they are in fact from Tangletown!), Besteyfield Farm, and Maple Wind Farm round out the share. Breakfast is almost made!
Cheese Share: Another scrumptious cheese this week from Parish Hill Creamery. This cheese is called Idyll. This is a part-skim, long aged mountain cheese with a scattering of small eyes throughout the solid, toothsome paste. Tropical and piquant notes mingle in this sharp yet sweet cheese. Idyll slices nicely and melts beautifully. This cheese is aged 18 months.