Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 28, 2018

Announcements

This week I'm excited to share a variety of fresh greens! Slowly but surely our greenhouses are becoming more exciting with things we can eat. It feels like winter has been here forever, and I'm sure your fridges are loaded with roots just like mine! I've added some more recipe ideas for using those roots and I've enjoyed seeing what members come up with through social media. If you've found a great recipe or use for your veggies, tag us on Instagram (@petes.greens) or send me an email!
To that end, we're launching our Late Spring Share season early - April 4 - and I'd love your help in spreading the word! Some of this season's CSA pick-up sites are down a little in members, and to keep these sites viable, we'll need more members. If you have suggestions for a place in your neighborhood to hang a poster, or if you can post to your local FPF or put up a poster in your workplace, please let me know!
Below are some photos from Monday from our "head house" - the greenhouse where all of our seeds start out until they're strong enough to get transplanted into their summer season homes.
~ Taylar
 
KILBURN ST REMINDER:
IF YOU PICK UP IN THE SOUTH END OF BURLINGTON, PLEASE PICK UP YOUR SHARE AT DEDALUS WINE SHOP, 388 PINE STREET

MEAT SHARE

Next week is the first delivery of the Spring Meat Share! It's not too late to add a Meat Share onto your weekly order! Sign up this week and get started next week. Each month you'll receive a diversity of locally sourced, pastured meat - ethical eating for the omnivore! Each share is $50/ month. You'll receive a variety of meat - whole chickens, chicken pieces, a diversity of pork cuts and flavors, sandwich steak, hamburger, grass-fed steaks, and more! Here's what's coming up for March:
Pete's Pastured Chicken (6-6.5#)
VT99 Breakfast Sausage (1# package)
VT99 Pork Chops (2 chops)
McKnight Farm Burger Meat (1# package)
Sign up today here or contact Taylar to add a meat share onto next week's delivery.
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
ACTION TIME!
We know from years of running our Good Eats program that many of our members value organic produce, which is often why they choose our CSA. The national organic certification program is in trouble. Recent moves by the USDA have weakened what that definition mean. In the past, we've posted about Farmer Rallies to Protect Organic and Pete's written about testifying before the National Organic Standards Board to prevent hydroponic growing from being classified as "organic".
A group of Vermont farmers started the Real Organic Project in an effort to support real organic farming. This movement has now spread nationwide. Our own Pete is on the Standards Board, working to develop a new organic label for food that is really, truly produced using organic methods (think of the growing process as a soil-to-soil model, building good soil, planting organic seeds, generating clean water, contributing oxygen for clean air, sustaining a diversity of insect and pollinator species, foregoing use of harmful chemicals, and back into compost).
You can find out more here and if you can spare it, give a few bucks to keep the movement going. For our farm, being organic is more than just a label; it's a whole farm process. We know we can do better to reclaim this important distinction between how we produce food and how others produce food, because supporters of "organic" know it's about more than just what we put into our bodies!
Stay tuned as this effort really gets underway!
Pete's Greens crew members at the first Farmer Rally to Keep the Soil in Organic, Stowe

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Mesclun, Shoots, Cress, Red Beets, Rainbow Carrots, Sweet Potatoes, Yellow & Red Onions, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers and Frozen Celery

Everyday Standard

Mesclun, Shoots, Beets, Rainbow Carrots, Sweet Potatoes, Yellow & Red Onions, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

Fancy

Mesclun, Shoots, Parsley, Rutabaga, Rainbow Carrots, Mixed Potatoes, Red Cippolini Onions, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

Bread Share

Slowfire Bakery
Hearty Maine Wheat

Pete's Pantry

Slowfire Bakery Bread, Cellars at Jasper Hill Weybridge, and Ploughgate Creamery Maple Butter

Cheese Share

Cellars at Jasper Hill
Kinsman Ridge
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: The greens mix this week includes a wide diversity of greens: baby spinach, claytonia, arugula, mizuna, upland cress, and baby brassica mix. The greens are pre-washed and ready to eat. Unopened, this bag will last for at least a week or 10 days. Opened, it will start to deteriorate after a few days.
Parsley: It's exciting to have parsley back! Not only is it a greenhouse delicacy, but it has lots of benefits: many claim that flat-leaf parsley has more flavor than curly but all parsley has huge nutritional benefits - high in vitamins A, C, and K, and in folic acid (great for pregnant women!). The activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a "chemoprotective" food, meaning it can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens. Try adding parsley stems to your simmering stock, both to impart flavor and help clarify the broth. It can be sprinkled an a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetables sautes, and grilled fish. It can be a rub for chicken lamb, and beef when combined with garlic, lemon zest, and salt. It's a key flavor ingredient in the Mediterranean dish tabouli (see recipe below). A nice way to store is to place the parsley bunch stems in a glass of water, like flowers in a vase, and then cover loosely with a plastic bag and keep in the fridge. If this is too finicky, just store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in crisper drawer.
Shoots: This nutritious mix is made up of sunflower and radish shoots. Shoots tossed into any slaw, salad, or sandwich are delicious! They'll keep in the bag for at least a week.
Upland Cress: This lovely spring green will be bunched in your veggie bag. It has a deep pungency with a unique twist between arugula and horseradish, pledging its allegience to the mustard family. Below the Mason Dixon line, upland cress is known as "creasy greens" and when stewed with ham hocks, is as loved a dish as black-eyed peas or cornbread. Traditionally gathered by foragers in the Appalachian Mountains who started looking out for the hearty winter leaves while there was still snow on the ground, the leaves were believed to have medicinal benefits and used in many folk recipes to help heal wounds. Those claims may not be entirely far-fetched as the cress is indeed rich in vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, and calcium.
Use cress the same way you would watercress. Left raw, the leaves can be chopped and mixed into a salad, tucked into a sandwich, or tossed over broiled fish as a garnish. Use a food processor to blend a handful of cress with a cup of creme fraiche or sour cream and a few garlic cloves for a zesty side to grilled meats or blend into soups. Store in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer for 1-2 weeks.
Carrots: These large colorful carrots have a lot of kitchen functionality. Our colorful carrots are a mix of varieties that we grow during the summer months, including cosmic purple, Yellowstone, sugarsnax, atomic red and lunar white (possible). If you are having trouble getting your kids to eat their carrots, perhaps you can use these names to generate some enthusiasm. These varieties are beautiful shredded in salads. I like to cut them crosswise on a slight angle, producing an eye-catching irregular oval. Carrots should be stored unwashed, loosely wrapped in the crisper drawer of your fridge. I recommend peeling before eating. You can find more carrot recipes on our website. In addition to munching on raw carrot sticks, here are a few more ideas:
  • Grate and add to stir fries and fried rice dishes
  • Grate and add to muffins or carrot cake
  • Grate on top of granola or muesli in the morning
  • Grate onto salads
  • Make carrot pickles
  • Make a classic carrot-raisin salad
  • Brown sugar-glazed carrots
  • Bake peanut butter carrot cookies
  • Add to banana bread
  • Juice with apples and limes
  • Roast with salt, pepper, rosemary, mash, and add to a homemade pasta sauce
Store carrots loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Frozen Sweet Peppers: Yummy frozen peppers this week! You'll receive either all red peppers or a colorful blend of peppers. These are sweet peppers we grew last summer then sliced and froze for you. I use them often in making Mexican-style dishes, using only a handful at a time or the whole package. I throw them into a frying pan frozen, but you can let them thaw out first. They're also nice when added to stir-fries - a great pop of color and flavor this time of year!

Featured Recipes

Easy Braised Creasy Greens
This beloved southern dish is packed with the nutrients inherent in your upland cress, including vitamin C! Serve with cornbread or corn muffins.
1-2 tablespoons olive oil, coconut oil or meat drippings (bacon, sausage, steak etc)
1 bunch fresh cress, about 4 cups, washed, de-spined and coarsely chopped. You can also sub kale, collards, mustard or turnip greens, or a mixture of winter greens.
1 clove garlic, chopped and/or 1 Tbs ginger, julienned
1/2 onion, diced
1/8 cup water or vegetable or chicken broth or stock
Sea salt and coarse grind pepper 
Optional seasonings: add a shake of Sesame oil, apple cider vinegar, tamari, Braggs Liquid Aminos, Chinese 5 spice, or cayenne pepper
Optional toppings: toasted sesame seeds, chopped almonds or walnuts, toasted pumpkin seeds
Heat oil or drippings in a large skillet over medium-high heat and add greens and garlic/ginger and onion, stirring to coat with oil. Stir occasionally until greens are barely wilted and still have a green color, just a few minutes. 
Add vegetable broth or water and stir, allowing greens to steam until barely tender. Salt to taste. 
Add seasonings and toppings as desired and serve. 
Rutabaga Carrot Coleslaw with Buttermilk Garlic Dressing
from Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition
1 large or 2 medium rutabagas (about 1 pound)
1 large carrot
6 - 8 tablespoons Buttermilk Garlic Dressing (see below)
4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
Peel rutabagas and carrot; cut into large chunks and shred in food processor or on very large grate holes of hand- held grater.
Toss with remaining ingredients
Chill 1 hour or more.

Buttermilk Garlic Dressing
Ingredients
1 - 2 medium garlic cloves
4 tablespoons minced green onion
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup sour cream
Large pinch sugar
1/2 cup olive oil
Mince garlic; mash to a paste with fork or back of knife. Whisk garlic, green onion, vinegar, buttermilk, sour cream, and sugar in bowl. Gradually whisk in the olive oil. Season generously with salt and pepper, to taste.
Makes almost 1 1/2 cups.
Coconut-Carrot Morning Glory Muffins
Muffins are a great thing to bake in a double batch with kids. These are great for a morning snack. Try throwing some in the freezer for rushed mornings. From Eating Well, February 2013.
1 cup whole-wheat or white whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup old fashioned rolled oats, plus 2 tbs for garnish
2 tsp baking powder
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp allspice
2 large eggs
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/3 cup honey
2 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 cup coconut oil, melted (could also subsitute canola oil)
2 cups shredded carrots
1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut, plus 2 tbs for garnish
1/2 cup raisins
Preheat oven to 350F. Coat a 12-cup muffin tin with cooking spray. Whisk whole-wheat flour, 1/2 cup oats, baking powder, cinnamon, salt and allspice in a medium bowl. In a separate bowl whisk eggs, applesauce, honey and vanilla. Whisk in coconut oil. Gently stir in the flour mixture just until moistened. Fold in carrots, 1/2 cup coconut and raisins. Divide the batter among the muffin cups. Sprinkle with the remaining 2 tbs each oats and coconut. Bake the muffins until they spring back when lightly touched, about 30-35 minutes. Let stand in the pan for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack.
Golden Gratin of Carrots, Rutabagas & Turnips with Sage
This recipe comes from a fellow CSA in Wisconsin in a region that I call the NEK of WI, Driftless Organics. I love perusing their recipe collection for inspiration. The next few recipes are from them.
Butter for the dish
Bechamel Sauce:
2 cups milk
3 Tbsp. onion, finely minced
2 sprigs of sage, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
4 Tbsp. butter
3 Tbsp. flour
Salt & pepper to taste
Grated nutmeg
1 large rutabaga, peeled & cut into julienne strips
1 small onion, finely diced
1 Tbsp. butter
1 large or 2 small turnips, peeled & julienned
2 large carrots, julienned
Salt & pepper to taste
1 cup fresh bread crumbs

Preheat oven to 375 degrees & lightly butter a 2 quart gratin dish.
Make the béchamel: in a saucepan, slowly heat milk with the onion, sage, & garlic. When it reaches a boil, turn off the heat. In another saucepan, melt butter & stir in flour & cook for a minute.
Whisk in the contents of the hot milk pan.
Cook until thickened & either turn heat way down & stir continuously for about 10 minutes, or transfer to a double boiler & cook for about 20 minutes.
Season with salt, pepper, & nutmeg.
Meanwhile, boil julienned rutabaga in salted water for about 2 minutes & drain.
Cook the onion in butter in a small skillet until starting to brown & combine with the rest of the vegetables. Season with salt & pepper & transfer to gratin dish.
Pour béchamel over the top, cover with bread crumbs, & bake until bubbling & golden on top, about 45 minutes.
Orange Glazed Golden Beets & Carrots w/Bacon
Dani Lind, for Driftless Organics
3 Tbsp. olive or sunflower oil
3 medium gold beets, cut into 8 wedges each
4 medium carrots, cut into similar sized pieces
1 large shallot, minced
3 slices bacon, cut into ¼” strips crosswise
Salt & pepper to taste
¼ c. golden raisins, coarsely chopped
¼ c. orange juice
Heat oil in a large skillet (well-seasoned cast iron or nonstick) over medium heat & stir in beets, carrots, shallots, bacon, salt & pepper.
Mostly cover with a lid (leave it open an inch or so) & cook for 7-8 minutes, stirring once or twice, until vegetables start to brown.
Uncover & add raisins & orange juice. Turn the heat down a bit & cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes, for another 12-14 minutes, until liquid has turned to a glaze & vegetables are nicely caramelized. Serve immediately.
Grated Beet and Carrot Salad
Another one from Driftless Organics
1 large raw beet, coarsely grated
1 large carrot, coarsely grated
1 inch piece of fresh ginger root, finely grated
2 Tbsp. oil (canola, vegetable, sunflower, peanut, etc.)
3 Tbsp. cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced salt & pepper to taste
¼ c. minced red onion
2 Tbsp. cilantro, finely chopped (optional)
Pile of mesclun

Place beets & carrots in separate bowls.
Combine ginger, oil, vinegar, & garlic.
Toss beets with half of the dressing & add salt & pepper.
Mix together the red onion, carrots, cilantro (if using), & the remaining dressing with salt & pepper.
Arrange the mesclun on a platter, Mound the carrots & beets artfully on top of them & serve.
Tabouli
I had to include this to go along with the parsley. Make sure you give it time to marinate in the fridge! Serves 6.
1 cup bulgur
1 1/2 cups boiling water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice -- and/or lime juice
1 teaspoon garlic -- crushed
1/2 cup chopped scallions
1/2 teaspoon dried mint flakes
1/4 cup olive oil -- (good quality)
fresh black pepper
2 medium tomatoes -- diced
1 cup fresh parsley -- chopped and packed
Optional: 1 cup chopped cucumber and/ or 1/2 cup coarsely grated carrot
Combine bulgur, boiling water, and salt in a bowl. Cover and let stand 15-20 minutes, or until bulgur is chewable. Add lemon juice, garlic, oil, and mint, and mix thoroughly. Refrigerate 2-3 hours (this is important, the bulgur needs to marinate). Just before serving add the vegetables and mix gently. Correct seasonings. Garnish with olives.
Shoot Salad
This recipe came from our former wash-house manager, Annie. This was her stand-by recipe for a bowl of greens in her kitchen.
2 eggs
Shoots salad mix
Olive oil
Mustard
Apple cider vinegar
Salt & Pepper
Optional: blue cheese, walnuts, almonds, bacon
Hard boil two eggs (Place the eggs in a small pot of cold water. Heat over medium heat. Remove from the stove as soon as water boils. Let sit ten minutes. Remove the eggs from the water.) While still warm, chop the eggs into large pieces and throw them on top of a bowl of greens. Mix up a dressing of mostly olive oil, a squirt of dijon mustard, a bit of apple cider vinegar, and a solid pinch of sea salt and pepper. Pour dressing over the eggs and greens, and mix. Sometimes almonds, or bacon, or blue cheese make it into the bowl, but eggs and a mustard dressing are the basics.
 

Pantry Lore

This week's bread comes from Scott Medellin at Slowfire Bakery in Jeffersonville. This is his "Malt Country": sourdough made with cracked malted rye and whole malted wheat berries from Peterson Quality Malt (Monkton, VT). A note about our bread: This Spring, you'll receive bread from Slowfire, Patchwork, and Red Hen bakeries, plus some other bread products I'm working with bakers to develop for us. Unfortunately, given the small-scale of many of our artisan bakers, and the bake schedules under which they work, there are only so many options available to our CSA. If you discover a new baker who can handle the capacity of our CSA, and bake and deliver to Craftsbury on a Tuesday, please let me know!
The Cellars at Jasper Hill produced the Weybridge cheese in your share this week. Located in Greensboro just 10 miles from our farm, Mateo and Andy Kehler have been churning out incredible, unique cheeses for 20 years that represent "a taste of place". The brothers (along with their wives) bought "the old Jasper Hill farm" in 1998 with a dream of bringing it back to life. The brothers wanted to create model for small-scale dairy farming in this part of the state, creating a valuable, value-added product out of milk that was created from the local community. Today, Jasper Hill is a one-of-a-kind cheese cellar, a dairy farm, and a name synonymous with "award-winning artisan cheese". We're neighbors, friends, and collaborators with Jasper Hill and I hope you enjoy this Weybridge cheese, made with milk from Patty and Roger Scholten's organically raised Dutch Belt cows in Weybridge, VT (Addison County). This is a lactic-set cheese made with a bloomy rind. Inside the cheese, you'll find a dense, milk core surrounded by a delicate cream-line, enclosed by the thin, soft, fluffy rind (which is edible).
Rounding out the share is maple butter from Ploughgate Creamery. Marisa Mauro has spent her life making value-added dairy products, including the Willoughby cheese recipe now made Jasper Hill. Today, Marisa makes artisan cultured butter and this week we feature her maple flavored butter, just in time to celebrate sugaring season. Ploughgate is located in Fayston on "the old Bragg farm", which Marisa purchased with help from the Vermont Land Trust a few years ago. You can read more about Marisa and the butter-making process from a recent Boston Globe article here.
Bread Share members receive a loaf of bread from Slowfire BakeryHearty Maine Wheat: a blend of whole & sifted wheat flours from Maine Grains.
Cheese Share members receive a piece of Kinsman Ridge from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. Kinsman Ridge is a French-style tomme, semi-soft with a brine-washed rind. It's made with cow's milk from the Erb family farm in Landaff, NH.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 21, 2018

Announcements

Welcome to week 2 of our Spring share! Forecast is bringing spring-type rains, and mixed amounts of sunshine. The more sun, the more our greenhouses will produce! I'm excited that we have bunches of chard back; the first bunch of greens from our greenhouses. Melissa, Tobin, and I have been busy planning out greens based on what we believe will be available from the greenhouse over the next few weeks. February is always the toughest month for us as we transition our greens growing and spring/ summer starts, plus battling unpredictable weather! See more from Melissa below.
Also from Melissa this week is info about our "beneficial insects" program. We raise three types of aphids - insects - to control bug populations inside our greenhouses. You can view the 3 1/2 minute video here.
What to do with those plastic bags your veggies arrive in each week? Return them! Many of our members find uses for their CSA bags while others end up with piles of them wondering, "what in the world do I do with these bags?!" Through some awesome connections with our CSA members, we've found a home for them - the Montpelier Food Shelf picks up clean CSA bags from one of our CSA sites in Montpelier and uses them for bagging items at the food shelf. Please return your CLEAN veggie bags (please, no red meat bags) to your CSA site and we'll get them to the food shelf!
You may also return your clean cardboard egg cartons to your CSA site. Those will come back to our farm where they find their way back to their producers who reuse the cartons.
~ Taylar
 
Reminder - Picking up your CSA Share
Everyday Standard share members: take a YELLOW bag (and frozen veggies)
Everyday Large members: take an ORANGE bag (and frozen veggies)
Fancy and Localvore members: take a PURPLE bag (and frozen veggies)
Localvore and pantry share members should take 3 - 4 "out of bag" pantry items. Check the checklist and the coolers.
Bread, egg, and cheese share members will look for their items at their site and in coolers. Items are individually labeled.
Check the weekly names checklist for instructions as to what to pick up. Find your name, then follow the line across and take what is listed for you! Then, check off your name. We use this at the end of the day to solve any mysteries.
If splitting a share, please coordinate so you don't take duplicates!
A sample of the weekly checklist you'll find at your site. Names on the left, bags in the middle, pantry and add-ons to the right. NOTE: This is not for this season!
Large shares take orange (left), Standard take yellow (top right), Fancy/ Localvore take purple (bottom right)
Around the Farm
The life of our winter chard
When planning for our winter food we are optimistically looking 2 seasons ahead. The chard that makes its way into your CSA this week and some of the other winter fresh harvested veggies such as parsley, cress, and sorrel were started in August. The seeds were sown in trays during our warmest summer month. These plants then grow in trays for a 4-5 weeks before we plant them into the greenhouses. In September, tomato season in slowing down but we want to hold on to those tomato plants as long as possible. So we plant on the sides of the tomato beds. When the tomatoes come at the end of September we fill in the rest of the beds with other later veggies such as spinach.
Having nice strong plants going into the winter is important. After that we are defending against really fidget temperatures and aphids. There are water pipes buried in the soil and in one greenhouse resting just above the soil surface to add some additional heat. Since we are heating a space with a thin plastic wall it is important that we do all we can to conserve that heat. We use row cover or remay (white UV penetrable blankets) to cover the plants and hold in the soil heat. Depending on the weather we may have as many as 3 layers of row cover on our plants to keep the plants from a hard freeze. As soon as we get a sunny day we can uncover, check plants for moisture, and assess quality. To defend against aphids through the winter months we release lady beetles that aggressively eat any lurking aphids. Check out the video about other beneficial insects we use to defend against aphids!
Sunshine makes all the difference this time of year. On a sunny day, you can almost watch the greenhouse plants growing upwards. But a stretch of clouds and those plants seem to stay in hibernation. So here’s to sunny weather and fresh greens.  
~Melissa
All these little specks are aphids. We're growing them and will plant these plants throughout the greenhouses to release the "good" (or beneficial) insects into the air, to trap and control the "bad" insects. This is an alternative to spraying harmful chemicals onto veggies.
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Mesclun, Chard, Green Cabbage, Parsnip, Celeriac, Adirondack Red Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Garlic, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Squash and Frozen Cauliflower

Everyday Standard

Mesclun, Green Cabbage, Rutabaga, Celeriac, Adirondack Red Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Garlic, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Squash

Fancy

Mesclun, Chard, Daikon Radish (or kohlrabi), Celeriac, Banana Fingerling Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Black Garlic, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Squash

Bread Share

Patchwork Farm & Bakery
Anna Rosie's Country French

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Farm Yogurt, Mary's Granola, Frozen Raspberries or Strawberries

Cheese Share

Sweet Rowen Farmstead
Storm
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: The greens mix this week includes spinach, two types of shoots, claytonia, and upland cress. The colorful greens pack a nutritional punch with iron in the spinach; Vitamin C in the claytonia (also called miner's lettuce); and vitamins, folic acid, antioxidants, and more nutritional benefits from the shoots and cress. All of these little greens have more to them than meets the eye! The greens are pre-washed and ready to eat. Unopened, this bag will last for at least a week or 10 days. Opened, it will start to deteriorate after a few days.
Adirondack Red Potatoes - Adirondack Red potatoes have a bright red skin and an even more vibrant interior! Use these purplish red potatoes, which do lighten some after cooking, as vibrant home fries for dinner or breakfast. Store in a cool, dry, dark place.
Banana Fingerlings: The unusual-looking, flavorful potatoes can be used just like regular potatoes in an assortment of roasted, broiled, baked, grilled, or boiled dishes.  With a firm texture and great flavor, the banana fingerling is perfect for salads, as well as roasting. These should be kept in a cool, dark place. Make sure that they are dry before storing.
Daikon Radish: The long white vegetable in Everyday Large bags is the daikon radish or Chinese radish. Raw daikon is great sliced thinly in soups and stir-fries, or grated in slaws and salads. Loosely wrap these radishes in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. This is the last of our daikon radish, so apologies for its slightly unsightly appearance; it can be peeled off.
Celeriac: Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.
Fancy share members are also receiving some of our black garlic. Perhaps you've seen it in the store and thought it looked too funky (and pricy) to try. This is a great opportunity! Black garlic is garlic that is "caramelized" - or browned - using a slow cooking process. It's sweet and a little tangy. We recommend keeping it in the refrigerator, but much like regular garlic, I prefer to keep mine on the counter. Try eating it as it is (peel off the skin and pop the clove directly in your mouth!) or spread it on a piece of bread. You can also use it as you would roasted garlic, as a rub on chicken or fish before roasting or mix it into dressings.
Frozen Squash: Frozen butternut squash comes from our partnership with High Mowing Seeds. Each year, they end up with thousands of pounds of squash from their seed trials. Some of the fruit ends up in Hardwick at the annual "Pies for People" event and we end up with a lot of it - after the seeds are extracted, we puree the flesh and make this yummy puree. The squash is great for making soups (see below) or adding to macaroni cheese or casseroles. I'm including a recipe for pumpkin bread that is not your typical "fall-pumpkin-spice" flavor. I think the puree would work well here; the spice is not over the top at all.

Featured Recipes

Warm Fingerling Potato Salad
Already looking for a good alternative to roasting roots? Tossing boiled roots with flavorful herbs and oil while they're still hot is the next-best thing. The warm vegetables soak in the flavors of the herbs beautifully, and the salad only gets better after a few days in the fridge.

2 pounds fingerling potatoes
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, smashed
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon salt-packed capers, rinsed and coarsely chopped
1 lemon, zested and juiced
1/2 medium red onion, coarsely chopped (1/2 cup)
1 celery stalk, thinly sliced crosswise on bias
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
Salt to taste

Place potatoes in a medium-sized saucepan covered 2 inches by salted water. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile in a small saucepan, combine olive oil, garlic, red pepper flakes, capers, lemon, and red onion. Bring to a simmer and remove from the heat. Drain the potatoes, halve lengthwise, and toss with warm dressing, celery, and parsley. Salt to taste and serve warm.
Steamed Fingerling Potatoes
Inspired by Ina Garten.
1 pound fingerling potatoes
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
pepper to taste
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed between your fingers
1 tablespoon sunflower or olive oil
In a saucepan cover potatoes with cold water and add 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered about 15 minutes, just until tender.
Drain potatoes in a colander. Toss with thyme and leave in colander, covered with a kitchen towel for about 10 minutes, or until cool enough to handle. Cut each potato in half lengthwise. Toss with remaining salt, pepper, thyme and oil. Serve warm.
Butternut Squash Ginger Carrot Soup
1 butternut squash (or package of frozen squash)
6 carrots
4 cloves garlic
1 thumb size piece (or larger) of fresh ginger
1 onion
1 qt stock (veg or chicken - fish could also work nicely here)
water
olive oil
salt & pepper
(optional - cream, milk, sour cream, or coconut milk)
Cover the bottom of a large stock/soup pot with oil and add diced onion and a bit of salt on low heat. Cook 5-10 minutes until the onion becomes translucent. Add garlic and ginger with salt and pepper to taste and cook another 5 min so the flavors blend. Peel, seed and cut the butternut squash into large chunks. Wash and cut the carrots into large chunks as well. Add the stock to the soup pot, then the carrots and squash, then add water to barely cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil and then simmer until the carrots are tender. Using a potato masher, crush the cooked veg then blend to your preference. I usually like to blend half leaving some of the mashed carrots and squash for some texture. At this point you can stir in something creamy if desired. I used about half a can of coconut milk recently and thought it was perfect. If using sour cream, add it into the serving bowl as a garnish.
Celeriac Remoulade (Celery Root Salad)
This salad is a refreshing cool coleslaw-like salad. A food processor makes the job of grating the celeriac much faster. 
1/2 cup mayonnaise (or swap in crème fraiche)
2 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 lb celery root - quartered, peeled, and coarsely grated just before mixing
1/2 tart apple, peeled, cored, julienned
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Combine the mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice and parsley in a medium-sized bowl. Fold in the celery root and apple and season with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, at least 1 hour.
Celery Root and Potato Puree
This comes from an Alice Water's cookbook, The Art of Simple Food. She highly recommends the combination of celery root (celeriac) and potatoes. Who am I to argue with Alice Waters? Serves 4.
1 lb. potatoes
5 TB butter, divided
1 medium celery root, about 3/4 lb., peeled, halved, then sliced thin
salt and pepper to taste
milk, optional for thinning 
Peel and cut potatoes into large pieces. Add to a medium pot of salted water over high heat and bring to a boil. Cook until soft, about 15-20 minutes. Drain and pass the potatoes through a ricer or food mill and return to the pot. Stir in 2 TB of the butter. While the potatoes cook, melt the rest of the butter in a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium low heat. Add the celeriac and salt. Cover tightly and cook until soft, about 12 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Lower heat if the celeriac begins to brown. Pass through a food mill, or puree in a blender. Stir celeriac puree into the potatoes. Add milk if the puree is too thick. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking.
Pumpkin Bread
I will admit: I've only made this recipe with squash that I've cooked down and pureed, but I think that using your frozen puree will work just as well! I would cook it down to thicken up a little bit first.
1 3/4 cups pumpkin puree
1/2 cup (120 ml) vegetable or another neutral cooking oil or melted butter (115 grams)
3 large eggs
1 2/3 (330 grams) cups granulated sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon fine sea or table salt
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Heaped 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg
Heaped 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
Two pinches of ground cloves
2 1/4 cups (295 grams) all-purpose flour
TO FINISH
1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 6-cup loaf pan or coat with nonstick spray. In a large bowl, whisk together pumpkin, oil, eggs and sugar until smooth. Sprinkle baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinanmon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves over batter and whisk until well-combined. Add flour and stir with a spoon, just until mixed. Scrape into prepared pan and smooth the top. In a small dish, or empty measuring cup, stir sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle over top of batter.
Bake bread for 65 to 75 minutes until a tester poked into all parts of cake (both the top and center will want to hide pockets of uncooked batter) come out batter-free, turning the cake once during the baking time for even coloring.
You can cool it in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove it, or cool it completely in there. The latter provides the advantage of letting more of the loose cinnamon sugar on top adhere before being knocked off.
Paleo Cauliflower Mac and Cheese
I found this interesting-looking paleo "mac & cheese" recipe using cauliflower - no pasta.
1 1/2 heads Cauliflower
4 T butter or coconut oil
1/2 t salt
1/2 C Water
1 small butternut squash (cut into small cubes – or try your puree for a creamy texture!)
1 small Carrot (peeled and diced)
1/2 small Sweet Onion (diced)
1/2 t garlic powder
3/4 t ground mustard
1 t salt
1 can coconut milk
1 Egg Yolk
Pepper (to taste)
Add the cauliflower to a large sauté pan as well as 2 T. butter, ½ t. salt, and water. Place on medium/high heat and cover with a lid. Let the cauliflower stead inside the pan for about 5 minutes, until mostly tender. Check the water levels every few minutes to make sure that it doesn’t all evaporate. When almost tender, remove the lid and let the cauliflower sauté for a minute or two, or until lightly caramelized in spots. Turn heat off, cover, and keep warm until ready to toss with the cheese sauce.
Heat 2 T. butter in a saucepan over medium/high heat. Add the squash, carrot, onion, garlic powder, mustard, and salt to the melted butter.
Sauté for 5 minutes, or until onion is translucent. Add the can of coconut milk to the saucepan and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer for about 10 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender and the coconut milk has reduced by 2/3 and is thick.
Pour the vegetables and coconut milk into a blender and puree until very, very smooth. Immediately add an egg yolk to the puree and blend well. The hot puree will cook the egg which will thicken the sauce and give it a rich texture.
Check seasonings and add more salt or pepper to taste. Pour over the hot cauliflower and toss to coat. Serve.
Daikon in Plum Sauce

Serves 3 to 4
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons plum sauce
1 tablespoon minced scallion
3 tablespoons peanut oil
1 daikon, peeled, cut into matchstick-sized strips
2 tablespoons water
1. Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, and cornstarch in a small bowl; stir until cornstarch dissolves. Stir in the plum sauce and scallions.
2. Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Swirl the oil around the wok so that it covers the cooking area, then add the daikon; cook, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds.
3. Add the water and cover. Cook until the daikon is tender, 1 to 2 minutes.
4. Add the soy sauce mixture and continue cooking, stirring vigorously, until the sauce has thickened, 2 to 3 minutes.
Stir-Fried Daikon
Serves 4
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 cup sliced scallions
1 medium daikon, thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
10–12 red radishes, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar

1. Heat the peanut oil in a wok over high heat. Add the scallions; stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the daikon and red radishes; stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the water and continue stir-frying until all the water has all evaporated.
2. Add the soy sauce, sugar, and chili oil, mixing everything together vigorously and cooking for 30 seconds more. Immediately transfer to a serving platter. Serve hot.
 

Pantry Lore

Butterworks Farm made this certified organic whole milk plain yogurt last week, from their organically fed Jersey cows. It's rich, flavorful, and has a nice creamy top. Milk from Jersey cows is rich, with a high protein count and fat content. Butterworks, in Westfield, VT, is powered by renewable energy, is family-run, certified organic, and committed to sustainable business practices that are healthy, safe, and improve environmental impact.
Mary's Granola is made by Mary Jane McKenzie in Greensboro. A budding entrepreneur, Mary spends her weekends and school breaks whipping up this yummy, low-fat granola. She came up this recipe to be healthy, delicious, and ready for everyday eating. It's made with organic rolled oats from Quebec, organic sesame seeds, organic sunflower seeds, organic shredded coconut, cinnamon, vegetable oil, and honey from her family's bees.
To go with your yogurt and granola, we've included frozen berries. You'll receive either sliced strawberries from Four Corners Farm in Newbury, VT or organic raspberries from Greg Smith's Berry Farm in Derby. You can let these thaw before topping off your yogurt, or throw them into a smoothie or juice frozen. You could also try cooking up a something sweet with them!
Bread Share members are receiving a Whole Wheat Loaf from Patchwork Farm and Bakery in East Hardwick.
Cheese Share members receive Storm from Sweet Rowen Farmstead in West Glover. Paul Lisai raises a heritage breed of cow and makes stunning cow's milk cheeses. Storm is a French-style bloomy rind cheese, hand ladled and with a fluffy (delicious) rind and creamy inside. Read more about Sweet Rowen here.