Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - July 25, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Mesclun, Yellow Onions, Carrot Bunch, Zucchini, Chard, Broccoli, Radish, Cilantro, Scapes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
6 ears Sweet Corn

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Mesclun, Yellow Onions, Zucchini, Chard, Scapes, Radishes
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Mesclun, Yellow Onions, Carrot Bunch, Cucumber, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Fava Beans, Scapes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
6 ears Sweet Corn

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Mesclun, Cucumber, Broccoli or Cauliflower, Chard,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn


Bread Share

Red Hen Baking Co
Polenta

Pete's Pantry

Lazy Lady Farm, Red Hen Baking Co Baguette, Honest-to-Goodness Apple Cider Vinegar, Jam

Cheese Share

Lazy Lady Farm
The Thin Red Line

Heat Warning!! If your site is outside, please pick up on the earlier side of things if possible! The greens do not like the heat... Thanks!


Do you use Instagram? If so, check us out! We post lots of pictures and stories -- it's a great way to find out about what's happening around the farm without waiting for the weekly newsletter!! We are @petes.greens !


Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Sweet Corn: So excited for sweet corn!!! It's here, and out of your bags. Please pick up the number of ears according to your share type (6 ears for Fancy/ Localvore and Large members, 4 ears for Standard and L&G shares). We've tried to find some nice medium sized corn for you, but there may be some smaller ears mixed in - no less delicious, though. Store corn in the fridge if you're not going to eat it right away, but it's best when fresh. Our crew picked this late in the day Tuesday, so eating it Wednesday or Thursday is ideal. There are different methods of cooking sweet corn on the cob. I prefer the boil method (remove husks and silk, cook in salted boiling water that just barely covers the corn) but you can try grilling it in the husk or steaming it. 
Fava Beans: This may be the last of our fava beans. They're a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins A and C, potassium and iron. Once you get them home keep them cool and eat them quick. The pale green skins can be left on or removed according to preference - to remove the skins, blanch in boiling water for one minute and then rinse in cold water. Slip off the skins before finishing by boiling or steaming until tender (approx. 2 - 5 minutes). These beans are great thrown onto a salad or just eaten plain.
Chard:  is a delicious nutritious green, high in Vitamins A, K, and C. The beautifully colored stems are why it's called rainbow chard! Chard works great as a spinach substitute but needs to be cooked down a bit longer. It also works well in soups and stews, or sauteed as a side.
Cauliflower: you'll find a full head of cauliflower or a couple of smaller heads of the white variety. You can eat the whole head - any of the small leaves attached to the vegetable are delicate and cook quickly, and the stalk can be thinly sliced and served raw with a dish of sea salt for an appetizer. Cauliflower can be enjoyed steamed, sauteed, roasted, or raw. I prefer it drizzled with olive oil and roasted - tossed with blue cheese is even better!

Featured Recipes

Sauteed Swiss Chard
I like this recipe because it uses the entire chard- stems and all! 
1 bunch Swiss chard, stems and leaves separated, stems chopped and leaves sliced into 1-inch thick strips
2 tbsp unsalted butter
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Add the chard stems to the boiling water and blanch for 2 to 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the stems to the ice bath and let cool completely. Drain the stems and set aside.
Melt the butter in a medium skillet. Add the chard leaves, stirring to coat. Cover and cook until wilted, stirring occasionally. Add the chard stems, brown sugar, vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste and cook until tender, about 5 minutes.
Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon Brown Butter
For this recipe, you can use as much cauliflower as you like - just adapt the amount of other ingredients. Sage is a great flavor for this time of year.
Ingredients
Olive oil
Sage leaves, loosely packed
Sea salt, more for tossing
1 - 3 medium-large heads cauliflower(about 3 pounds)
3 - 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 lemon, zest finely grated

Heat oil in a small pan until rippling. Add sage and cook, stirring, just until crisped, about 2 minutes. Lift out sage and drain on paper towels; transfer oil to a large bowl. Let sage cool and crumble with fingers into a small bowl. Stir in coarse salt and set aside.
Heat oven to 375 degrees. Place roasting pan with an inch of water in oven bottom. Add cauliflower to bowl with oil, add about 1 teaspoon table salt, and toss gently until coated. Spread out on two large baking sheets. Bake until browned, 20 to 30 minutes.
Melt butter in a small pan over medium heat. When foam subsides, watch closely and stir often. When white solids are brown and butter smells toasty, turn off heat, squeeze in juice of lemon and stir well.
Transfer cauliflower to a bowl, pour butter over, and add lemon zest. Add half the sage salt and toss. Taste and season with remaining salt as needed.

Seared Cauliflower with Garlic and Tamari
The tamari caramelizes the cauliflower, giving it a wonderful robustness. This makes a great side dish!
1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
2 tbsp tamari
3-4 tbsp water
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp minced parsley
Over medium-high heat, sauté the cauliflower, slowly stirring it until it just browns. Then add the tamari. When the tamari starts to stick to the pan, add 3 to 4 tablespoons of water and the garlic; allow the sauce to reduce until it just coats the cauliflower. Remove the cauliflower from the heat and immediately toss it with the parsley.
Options: Toss the cauliflower with the garlic, parsley, and tamari (no water) and bake it in a covered baking dish at 375 degrees F for 15 minutes

Favorite Broccoli Salad
This one just came from Amy - it was a hit with her family!
Ingredients
1 pound broccoli florets (from 1 ½ pounds broccoli stalks), thinly sliced and then roughly chopped (see photos)
½ cup raw sunflower seeds or slivered almonds
½ cup finely chopped red onion
½ cup grated sharp cheddar cheese (optional)
⅓ cup dried cranberries or dried tart cherries, chopped
Honey mustard dressing
⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
1 medium clove garlic, pressed or minced
¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
Instructions
Toast the sunflower seeds: Pour the sunflower seeds into a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently (careful, they’ll burn!), until the seeds are turning golden on the sides, about 5 minutes. Pour the toasted seeds into a large serving bowl.
Add the chopped broccoli, onion, cheese and cranberries to the serving bowl. Set aside.
In a 1-cup liquid measuring cup or small bowl, combine all of the dressing ingredients (olive oil, vinegar, mustard, honey, garlic and salt). Whisk until the mixture is well blended.
Pour the dressing over the salad and stir until all of the broccoli is lightly coated in dressing. I highly recommend letting the salad marinate for at least 20 minutes, or even overnight in the refrigerator.
Divide the salad into individual bowls and serve. Leftovers will keep well for 3 to 4 days in the fridge, covered.

 

Pantry Lore 

We have to be adaptable when working with fresh produce. I had anticipated raspberries to be here for this week's share (and last week's) but as I checked in with our producers, the rain came at the wrong time and they were unable to pick. I'm holding out hope for next week... so instead, we have some wonderful apple cider vinegar from Gingerbrook Farm. This is their Honest-to-Goodness vinegar, made with apples from their historic orchard. You may see some of the "mother" vinegar floating around the bottom of the bottle. This is perfectly harmless and is testimony to the goodness of what you're receiving this week. This time of year, apple cider vinegar, a little olive oil, and salt & pepper make a great dressing for cucumber/ tomato salads or a healthy lettuce salad
Red Hen Baking Co made the baguettes for you to enjoy with your Lazy Lady Farm cheese. Oh yum! I love Laini's goat cheese and love that she's a woman owned and operated off-grid goat dairy making artisand award-winning seasonal cheeses. There's a thin layer of paprika in this week's Thin Red Line - enjoy this special cheese. (I saw Randy at the Capital City Farmer's Market a few weeks ago - his shirt speaks volumes!)
And, jam from Ruth Antone, a jam maker in Williston. She grows all the fruit and makes the jam!

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - July 18, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Spinach, Romaine, Pac Choi, Basil, Fava Beans, Gold Beet Bunches, Lacinato Kale, Cucumber, Mixed Sweet Pepper, and
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Spinach, Romaine, Basil, Gold Beet Bunch, Kale, Beans or Peas,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Spinach, Romaine, Cilantro, Zucchini, Fennel, Mizuna, Beans, Pac Choi,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Mesclun, Basil, Kale, Cucumber, Carrot bunch, and
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes


Bread Share

Mansfield Breadworks

Pete's Pantry

All Souls Tortilleria Tortillas, Sweet Rowen Farmstead Cheddar, Peaceful Harvest Mushrooms, Pete's Greens Tomatillo Salsa
+ Apples

Cheese Share

Sweet Rowen Farmstead
Mountain Chaga

Around the Farm

We're in the middle of it now! Hot dry weather is great for NE Kingdom vegetable farms - great productivity. We do need rain though, looking like the inch we were counting on today might not come to fruition. Our big project this week is seeding 21 acres of storage carrots. They are the sweet goodness we enjoy until next June. We've been irrigating to get the soil moist before seeding. Garlic harvest starts tomorrow. It's a little early but we have a lot this year and need to get started so it doesn't get over mature. It's a nice crop - you'll be receiving all you want in your shares this fall and winter.
Got to go get on a tractor, we got enough rain this am to settle the dust a bit.
~Pete
Hector, Alejandra, and Socorro with the tomatoes, above. Alejandra and me -- tomato selfie!
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach: Most shares are receiving a bag of our baby spinach. Tender and versatile, always delicious! For eating fresh or cooked.
Basil: Packed separately this week. It is a staple in Mediterranean cooking as well as Thai, Vietnamese, and Laotian. The herb is highly aromatic, or put another way, the oils in basil are highly volatile. Thus, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process so it will retain its maximum essence and flavor. Basil should be kept in a plastic bag or kept stem-down in a glass of water with plastic over the leaves, for about a week with regular water changing. Keep your basil out of extreme cold as it could damage the fragile leaves.
Sweet Peppers: Starting to trickle in... these are multi-colored sweet peppers that add a nice variety and color to your plate. Great for snacking and cooking.
Beet Bunches:  These bunched gold beets were freshly harvested and have their tops on. You can eat beet greens as well as the roots. The tops are great in salads or sauteed. Gold beets are great because you can toss them in your salads without turning everything a uniform pink. Beets are great this time of year grilled in a foil pouch with other veggies, or shaved thinly over salads.
Tomatoes: We're in a tomato boom! This week you're receiving 2 pounds of red, yellow, pink, or a combination of tomatoes. Please take one bag of tomatoes with your veggie share - please be careful at pickup as mushrooms are also packed in paper bags (but labeled with a sticker).
Fava Beans: The fact that they came up so nicely this year was a neat surprise. They're a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins A and C, potassium and iron. Once you get them home keep them cool and eat them quick. The pale green skins can be left on or removed according to preference - to remove the skins, blanch in boiling water for one minute and then rinse in cold water. Slip off the skins before finishing by boiling or steaming until tender (approx. 2 - 5 minutes). These beans are great thrown onto a salad or just eaten plain.
Romaine: This lettuce makes a great salad or adds some crunch to a sandwich. Store it in the fridge in a large plastic tub with a piece of paper towel to absorb excess moisture and condensation. If you store wet lettuce in a produce bag, it will likely only last a couple days.
Mizuna: Mizuna is a Japanese mustard green with tender, pointy-lobed leaves and a pleasant, peppery flavor. You could substitute it, chopped, in a salad calling for arugula. It adds a nice zest to a stir-fry or saute too. Store mizuna, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

Featured Recipes

Moroccan Style Fava Bean Salad with Yogurt and Crunchy Bits
This recipe was recommended by Amy Skelton, from Jamie Oliver's cookbook Jamie's Dinners. It sounds refreshing and delightful on a hot day!
4 large handfuls of shelled fava beans
2 lemons
a handful of fresh mint, leaves picked
1 small red onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 tsp cumin seeds, bashed
a pinch of dried chilli
a handful of stale breadcrumbs
1 1/4 cup creamy live plain yogurt (or sour cream)
Shell the beans! Blanch the beans in unsalted boiling water for a couple of minutes, giving the large ones a bit longer (you can do this in two batches) - contrary to typical boiling rules, don't add salt as it toughens the skins. Drain them then lay them flat on a tray to cool down slightly. The salad works best when the beans are eaten slightly warm. If you're making it in advance, give the beans a quick flash in the microwave just before serving.
Remove the skins from the larger beans if necessary. Place in a bowl and dress with the juice of 1 lemon and three times as much extra virgin olive oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add more lemon juice if needed - adjust to taste. Finely slice half the mint and add it to the beans while they sit and marinate for a little while.
In a shallow pan, on medium heat, fry the chopped onion, cumin seeds, and chili in a little olive oil. Stir and cook until softened. As the onions start to color, add your breadcrumbs and mix these really well into the onions. Continue to cook until the crumbs are crispy and golden, then season them to taste and put to one side. To serve, divide the yogurt or sour cream between four plates or bowls. Give the fava beans a final toss, ad the rest of the mint, and divide between the plates on top of the yogurt. Finally, sprinkle over the warm "spiced crunchy bits". Add lemon zest for a little extra zing. Serve with grilled chicken or as an antipasto.
Basil Puree
This is a great way to use your basil. The puree is very similar to pesto without the cheese and nuts. It's thinner and lighter and a great addition to grilled zucchini, roasted pepper, or green beans.
1 small clove garlic
Sea salt
1 bunch basil
1/3 cup olive oil
Pound the garlic in a mortar with 1/4 tsp salt until smooth. Set aside.
Bring a pot of water to a boil, add the basil leaves, and leave them for just a few seconds until they're bright green, then drain immediately. In a food processor or blender, puree the drained leaves, garlic mixture, and olive oil until smooth. Season to tast. The sauce is best used immediately, but can be stored in an airtight container for 1-2 days.
Beet and Mizuna Salad
This is a simple yummy salad. It calls for steaming beets, but you could boil til tender, or (my favorite), cut into 1/2 to 1" pieces and broil them. And way you make it, it will be delicious. Adapted from Epicurious.com.
1 small bunch mizuna
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar (or cider vinegar)
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup toasted walnuts, chopped
1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled (optional)
Discard course stems from mizuna, then wash greens well and dry.
Whisk together vinegar, salt, and pepper to taste, and whisk in oil until emulsified. Pour half of the vinaigrette over the beets and toss well. With the remaining vinaigrette, drizzle enough over mizuna to lightly coat, and toss well. Arrange mizuna and beets on two plates. Sprinkle walnuts on top and, if desired, add goat cheese and serve.

Fava Bean Salad with Roast Garlic Vinaigrette
For the Vinaigrette
1 head garlic, 1/2 inch cut off top to reveal cloves
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
3/4 teaspoon coarse salt
1/4 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
3/4 cup (2 ounces) walnuts, toasted and chopped
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
For the Salad
1 pound shucked fresh fava beans
2 cups fresh corn kernels (from 2 ears of corn)
1 medium cucumber, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced (1/2 cup)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled 
Make the vinaigrette: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Drizzle garlic with 1 teaspoon oil. Wrap in parchment, then in foil. Bake until soft, about 30 minutes. Squeeze garlic from skins. Mash until smooth.
Whisk together the remaining ingredients with 1 tablespoon of the roasted garlic and remaining 2 teaspoons oil.
Make the salad: Prepare an ice-water bath. Cook beans in a large pot of boiling water for 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer beans to ice-water bath. Let cool completely, and remove with the slotted spoon. Cook corn in same pot for 1 minute, and drain in a colander. Peel thin shells off beans.
Toss cucumber, onion, parsley, feta, beans, and corn with the vinaigrette.
Beet Caprese
beets
tomatoes
fresh mozzarella
fresh basil
olive oil
salt & pepper
Preheat the oven to 400. Wash the beets, trim the ends and wrap them individually in foil. Bake for about an hour, or until the beets are tender (a knife should face no resistance).
Cool, peel and slice the beets.
Slice the fresh mozzarella.
Combine beets with mozzarella, basil, olive oil, salt & pepper.

 

Pantry Lore 

Tortillas from All Souls Tortilleria Tortillas are made from organic VT grown heirloom corn called Flint's Flint from Borderview Farm in Alburg. Nixtamalized, ground, and cooked in Warren, VT. These are coming to you fresh and should be used within 14 days, otherwise please refrigerate them!
Shiitake mushrooms from Peaceful Harvest are a nice treat! These mushrooms are delicious to enjoy in any number of summer meals. You can try seasoning them with garlic, cumin, and chili for a lovely Mexican spice. Mushrooms are in a paper bag and labeled with a sticker. Please be careful when picking up this week that you do not mistake tomatoes for mushrooms.
Cheddar this week is from Sweet Rowen Farmstead in West Glover. Sweet Rowen is a small but growing dairy - an unique trend in an era of declining dairy farms! There are two types of cheddar available - please take one. The mild cheddar is in fact mild! The hot cheddar has a little bit of a kick to it, but not much, and mostly at the very end. It is made with jalapeños and habaneros. Both are excellent melting cheeses, perfect for quesadillas, nachos, pizzas, or grilled cheeses.
Pete's Greens Tomatillo Salsa was made on our farm last summer using our own farm-grown tomatillos, jalapeños, and onions! It was frozen and when thawed is ready to enjoy. It has a little bit of heat at the end. If you're not planning to use it within a week, please keep in the freezer.
**Don't forget your bag of replacement apples! Last week's apples from Champlain Orchards were a little funky and sent in error. They've sent a different variety.**
The cheese share offering this week comes from Sweet Rowen Farmstead. This is calledMountain Chaga, a bloomy rind cheese with a dusting of dried chaga, a wild mushroom that grows on dead birch trees. It's a little bit bitter and drier than some bloomy rinds, but is very delightful on the palate and is a nice treat as it is a limited-time, small batch cheese! Enjoy!