Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - November 29, 2017

From the Farm

And we're back to normal! I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving. Our crew is back in action. Sorry for missing last week's Sneak Peek; I thought I had it ready to queue but neglected to get it out.
We've been working on some new add-ons to the share options that we'll be announcing in the next couple of weeks - stay tuned! If you're looking for a great gift this Christmas, let us help! We have gift certificates available in any denomination. You can even buy someone a full share! Just send me an email at goodeats@petesgreens.com.
And, today is "Giving Tuesday". There are a lot of really great organizations to donate to today; our friends at Salvation Farms and NOFA-VT are two great organizations that we recommend. Salvation Farms uses our "seconds" (not market quality) veggies for both local food shelves and their VT Commodity Program, a workforce development and food security program. NOFAworks statewide to support organic farming; their Farm Share program helps income-eligible Vermonters receive subsidized CSA shares.
~ Taylar
Reminder!!!
We take off the week of Christmas, so no delivery on December 27!!
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Salad Mix, Lettuce Head, Tatsoi, Parsley, Yellow Onions, Modoc Potatoes, Mixed Carrots, Kohlrabi, and Acorn Squash

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Lettuce Head, Tatsoi, Red Cabbage, Mixed Carrots, Modoc Potatoes, and Acorn Squash

Fancy

Salad Mix, Parsley, Black Garlic, Tatsoi, Sweet Salad Turnips, Valentine Radish, Mixed Carrots, Fingerling Potatoes, Leeks, and Acorn Squash

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Lettuce Head, Lacinato Kale, Arugula, Parsley, Radicchio, and Sweet Salad Turnips

Pete's Pantry

Gleason Grains Pearled Barley, Pete's Greens Sweet Basil Pesto, and Ploughgate Creamery Salted Butter
Acorn squash is a the classic old favorite green winter squash with distinctive longitudinal ridges and sweet, yellow-orange flesh. It's a good source of dietary fiber and potassium, as well as smaller amounts of vitamins C and B, magnesium, and manganese. It's excellent baked or roasted, steamed or stuffed with rice, meat, or vegetable mixtures. Try roasting veggies with cilantro and baking them into the squash. Just slice off the top and scoop out the insides. Fill the squash with your fixings and bake in the oven around 350 degrees.
Valentine radishes are an Asian radish variety also known as Beauty Heart or Watermelon. They have a distinctive bright pink interior with a white, green and pink skin. Sweet, with just a hint of a radish bite, valentines are great in salads, slaw, or as crudites. You can also add to soups, or saute thinly sliced or shredded radish in butter with a pinch of salt. Cook lightly without browning. A stunning bright pink addition to any meal! Store Valentine radishes loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Tatsoi is a dark green Asian salad green that has a spoon like shape, a pleasant and sweet aroma flavor like a mild mustard flavor, similar to bok choi. Tatsoi is generally eaten raw or sauteed, but may be added to soups at the end of the cooking period. Store tatsoi in a plastic bag or container and use within several days.
Fancy share members are also receiving some of our black garlic. Perhaps you've seen it in the store and thought it looked too funky (and pricy) to try. This is a great opportunity! Black garlic is garlic that is "caramelized" - or browned - using a slow cooking process. It's sweet and a little tangy. We recommend keeping it in the refrigerator, but much like regular garlic, I prefer to keep mine on the counter. Try eating it as it is (peel off the skin and pop the clove directly in your mouth!) or spread it on a piece of bread. You can also use it as you would roasted garlic, as a rub on chicken or fish before roasting or mix it into dressings. If you have a favorite way to use it, please share!

Featured Recipes

Winter Tart with Potato, Leeks, and Mustard Greens
Here's an easy tart you can throw together. Leftovers make great lunches.
Prebaked pie crust
1 bunch mustard greens, chopped (or any other winter green: kale, chard, spinach, etc.)
1 leek, sliced
4-8 slices of bacon cooked, cooked and chopped
1 potato, sliced thin
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1/2 tsp ground mustard or a tsp prepared
1 TB olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
goat cheese
Heat a skillet and add 1 TB olive oil once hot. Add the sliced leeks and cook on medium, stirring, til leeks soften. Add the mustard greens and cook just a couple of minutes til wilted and remove from heat.
Layer in the cooked pie crust like so: sliced potato, greens & leek, bacon. Mix the eggs and milk together, and pour into the pie crust. You want the mixture to come almost to the top of the crust; if you don't have enough, add more egg/milk until it rises to that level. Cover with goat cheese crumbles. Bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes, or until the custard sets. Let cool a few minutes before serving.

Curried Squash Soup with Green Garnish
Mix the left over green garnish with eggs and cheese to make a frittata for a second evening's meal. 
1 winter squash, such as pumpkin or acorn, peeled and sliced thin
2 pinches sea salt
1 15 oz can coconut milk
2 pinches yellow curry powder
salt and pepper to taste
For garnish:
1 TB sunflower or olive oil
1 large leek, sliced thin
1 clove garlic, minced
1 bunch greens, washed, dried and chopped finely
salt and pepper to taste

Chili-Roasted Acorn Squash
2 acorn squash (1 1/2 pounds each), halved lengthwise, seeds removed
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons chili powder
Coarse salt and ground pepper
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Cut each squash half into several wedges, then halve wedges crosswise.
On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss squash with oil and chili powder; season with salt and pepper, and toss again. Roast until tender and starting to brown, 20 to 25 minutes, tossing halfway through.
Steam squash, sprinkled with salt, in a large pot over medium heat, until soft. Puree with coconut milk, curry powder, salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings.
While squash is steaming, heat oil in a large heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat. Add leeks and garlic and saute, stirring frequently, until leeks are translucent, about 5 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high and add mustard greens, salt and pepper. Saute, stirring frequently, until mustard greens turn deep green, about 5 minutes, decreasing heat if necessary. Taste for seasoning. Ladle hot squash soup into bowls and garnish with the sauteed greens.
Sweet and Sour Radish Salad

2 cups thinly shredded watermelon radish (2 medium size radishes)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar

Peel the radishes in generous thickness and save the skin if you wish to make pickle. Shred the pink flesh into strands of 1/8 inch thickness. Put the shredded radish in a bowl and mix in the rest of the ingredients. Mix well and marinate in refrigerator for about 20 minutes or so. Serve cold garnished with thinly sliced scallion. It is excellent as an accompaniment for meat dishes.
Sauteed Tatsoi
Here's a quick, tasty way to enjoy your tatsoi.
1 head tatsoi
Garlic
Salt
Olive oil
Slice the stems into 3/4-inch lengths and stir-fry them with some finely chopped garlic and a generous pinch of salt in olive oil for a minute or two, then add a couple tablespoons of water and steam them, covered, for a couple of minutes to soften them further. At that point add the whole leaves, stirring and turning them with tongs for about a minute, then add about ¼ cup water and another generous pinch of salt and steam, covered, until wilted and tender, about 3 to 4 minutes more.
You could give it an Asian flavor with ginger, soy sauce, and a touch of toasted sesame oil, but it’s just as delicious in a simple Italian-style treatment with garlic and olive oil.

Farmers Market Greens
This is a basic salad with a wonderful vinaigrette.
1 tablespoon Champagne vinegar
1/2 tablespoon finely chopped shallot
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 lb mixed baby greens such as kale, mizuna, tatsoi, mustard, arugula, and spinach (16 cups)
Whisk together vinegar, shallot, salt, and pepper in a large bowl, then add oil in a slow stream, whisking until emulsified. Add greens and toss until coated well.
Greens can be washed and dried 1 day ahead and chilled in a sealed plastic bag lined with paper towels. Vinaigrette can be made 6 hours ahead and chilled, covered. Bring to room temperature before using.
Now available in the Online Market - handmade wreaths by Anners and Danika Johnson! Three styles of evergreen wreaths available for delivery with your CSA. Check them out!
Place your order by noon on Monday for a Wednesday (or Thursday) delivery!

Pantry Lore

Pantry share members are receiving a bag of organic pearled barley, grown in Quebec and milled at Golden Crops owned by Michel Gaudreau. Pearled barley has been de-hulled, with some or all of the bran removed. It makes a great substitute in recipes calling for brown rice, is wonderful cooked, cooled and used in cold salads, and adds a nice texture to soups and stews. It also cooks down into a really nice risotto, without all of the attention and stirring required with Arborio rice. One cup of dry barley makes about 3 to 3 1/2 cups cooked. If you soak the grains for 6+ hours in cold water before use, you can reduce your cooking time by at least half. Without soaking, you'll want to let them simmer in water for a good hour. You can also cook barley like pasta, using lots of water (4-5 cups of water to 1 cup barley), then drain what's left over.
Our on-farm kitchen makes this sweet basil pesto with our own organic basil. We added lots of garlic, parmesan and romano cheeses, lemon, olive oil, and sunflower seeds to it. Some of our pesto may oxidize on the top (which darkens it), but just mix it up and it will regain its vibrant green color. For a special change, try mixing pesto up with cubed potatoes and roast in a 450 degree oven for 25 - 30 minutes. It's coming to you frozen, so freeze or use within a week.
Ploughgate Creamery's lightly salted, artisan butter is a treat! It's a great table butter and works well for baking, too. Marisa Mauro operates this creamery on the historic Bragg Farm in Fayston. Milk is sourced from local cows and through the St. Albans Co-op.
Mushroom Barley Risotto
This one is delicious. Adapted from a Splendid Table recipe.
4 ounce dried shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 medium carrots, peeled and diced (about 1 cup)
1 medium shallot, chopped (you can sub a bit more onion and a clove or 2 of garlic here)
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme
1 cup pearled barley
4-5 cups canned low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup grated Manchego or Parmesan cheese
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Heat the oil in a large, heavy stockpot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrots, and shallot and sauté 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms, wine, thyme, and barley, stirring until the wine is nearly evaporated. Add 4 cups of broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is almost completely absorbed and the barley is almost tender, about 25 minutes. Add the remaining 1cup broth and cook, stirring, until the barley is tender and creamy, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chopped parsley and cheese, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - November 21, 2017

From the Farm

From all of us at Pete's Greens, HAPPY THANKSGIVING! May you be nourished body and soul this weekend, and give gratitude for the bounty of the harvest season this year. Stay safe and warm if you're traveling! Don't forget to pick up your shares ONE DAY EARLY this week!
~ Taylar
 
Reminder!!!
This week please pick up your shares ONE DAY EARLY! (tomorrow or Wednesday)
Wednesday's delivery will happen on TUESDAY and Thursday's delivery will happen on WEDNESDAY. Same hours, different day.
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
 
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!
 

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Salad Mix, Celery, Goldball Turnips, Nicola Potatoes, Chioggia Beets, Parsnips, Garlic, Yellow Onion, and Pie Pumpkin

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Green Kale, Celery, Mixed Carrots, Nicola Potatoes, Parsnips, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Pie Pumpkin

Fancy

Salad Mix, Green Kale, Celery, Goldball Turnips, Parsnips, Chioggia Beets, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Pie Pumpkin

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Chard, Mixed Carrots, Kohlrabi, and Sweet Potatoes*
*forgive us this one time for including the low-starch popular sweet potato during Thanksgiving week!

Pete's Pantry

Vermont Cranberry Company Fresh Cranberries, Champlain Orchards Cortland apples, Sweet Rowen Farmstead cheese, and Tangletown Farm Eggs
Pumpkins are the essence of fall, and pumpkin recipes are sure comfort food. But be sure to use the correct type of pumpkin to achieve a richly flavored result in the kitchen. Pie pumpkins are not only smaller than jack-o-lantern type pumpkins but they also have a denser flesh and more sugars that make their edible quality much more like winter squash. In fact pumpkins and winter squash can be used interchangeably in many pie, soup & bread recipes. Not all! But many. Pie pumpkins are an excellent source of beta carotene, calcium and potassium. Store all winter squash and pumpkins in a cool, dry, dark place with good ventilation, like a porch or garage, but make sure they do not freeze, around 55F is perfect and for shorter duration (1-3 weeks) your kitchen counter should be fine. They should last over a month for decoration but use within a few weeks for best flavor quality. Once cut, you can wrap the leftovers in plastic and store in the refrigerator for 5 to 7 days.
Nicola potatoes are golden skinned, golden fleshed potatoes that are truly all purpose. They are great for boiling, mashing or roasting and are plenty waxy enough to make excellent potato salad. Nicolas have a very special attribute among potatoes - they are low on the glycemic index compared to all other varieties. This means they don't cause the blood sugar spike that other varieties may cause, an issue that can wreak havoc with people with insulin resistance. They also have a yummy slightly nutty flavor, enjoy! Store in a cool, dark place to avoid sprouting.
Goldball Turnips are yellow turnips that tend to have a long tail rather than a round shape and are creamy yellow on the inside. Try peeling, chopping, and sauteeing them with some carrots and onions for a veggie stir fry, or they're also great cooked and added to mashed potatoes.

Featured Recipes

Looking for a vegetarian stuffing dish that even non-vegetarians will love? Try this Kale and Caramelized Onion Stuffing recipe from Smitten Kitchen. A repeat Thanksgiving dish for me!
I'm not a pie baker, so the notes you see below are Amy Skelton's (who used to do the CSA and now is our Renaissance woman who knows everything at the farm!).
Pumpkin Pie
This one comes straight out of the Joy of Cooking. It's my favorite recipe for this classic pie and I have made this pie probably 50 times. It is that good. You really can use anything from heavy cream to milk, and even low fat works fine. Some cream content elevates this pie from real good to dreamy though. 
Prepared pre-baked pie crust
2 to 3 large eggs (2 for more pumpkin flavor, 3 for more soft custardy pie)
2 cups pumpkin puree
1 1/2 cups light cream or mix 3/4 cup heavy cream and 3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup firmly packed light or dark brown sugar (or maple sugar!)
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves or allspice
1/2 tsp salt
Directions
Position rack in the center of the oven. Preheat oven to 400°F.
Make pie crust and bake at 400°F for 20-30 minutes or until golden brown (see notes below on pre-baking your crust). Remove the pre-baked crust, paint the inside of the crust with egg yolk (I use my fingers for this) and bake for another 2 minutes to set the egg wash.
Turn oven down to 375.
Whisk the eggs together in a large bowl.
Add the rest of the ingredients and whisk together thoroughly until combined.
If the crust has cooled, warm it in the oven until it is hot to the touch.
Pour the pumpkin mixture into the crust and bake until the center of the filling seems set but quivery - like jello - when you nudge the pan. Should take roughly 45 minutes but this varies by oven, depth of the pie plate etc. Could be 55 minutes.
Remove the pie and let cool completely on a wire rack. Leftover pie should be refrigerated!
Pre-baking your crust
The only thing a little tricky about making pumpkin pie is that you are supposed to pre-bake the crust first and paint it with egg yolk to help keep it from getting soggy. Follow the directions in the apple pie recipe above for making the crust, and roll it out and shape your crust in your pie plate. If you just stick the pie plate in the oven now to pre-bake, your crust will shrink and slip down the sides of the pie plate. You have to somehow hold it in place while it pre-bakes for 20 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 400F.
Press a piece of aluminum foil, shiny side down, into/on top of the crust you have shaped in your pie plate. You need the aluminum foil to be depressed into your pie plate enough so that you can fit a slightly smaller pie plate nested in/on top of your prepared crust. The weight of the smaller pie plate will hold your crust in place while it's baking. (Alternatively, you can use uncooked rice or beans poured into the aluminum foil to hold the pie crust in place.) Bake for 20 minutes to set the crust. Then remove from oven, remove the pie plate weight(s) and aluminum foil. Prick the crust with a fork if it has puffed up. Then return to the oven and bake for 5-10 minutes more until golden brown all over.
Apple Pie
This is my favorite apple pie recipe. The pie is made with honey rather than sugar. The honey flavor comes through in the pie and gives the pie a rich, decadent flavor.
Crust:
2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1.5 sticks cold butter cut into 1/4" slices
Ice water
Pie filling:
7-8 Cortland apples, peeled, cored and sliced 1/4" thick
2/3 cup honey
3 TB flour
1 TB lemon juice
2 TB melted butter
1 tsp cinnamon
For the crust
Place flour, sugar and salt in a food processor and give it a quick pulse to mix. Toss in the slices of cold butter. Using the pulse button, pulse 7-8 times for 1 second each time until the flour butter mixture looks like very coarse cornmeal. Run a fork through it and look for butter chunks. The largest chunks should be pea sized or a bit larger (high bush blue berry sized?). Transfer to a mixing bowl. Pour in 1/3 cup of water and fold flour in from outer edges of bowl with a rubber spatula. The goal in mixing water into the dough is to do it with as few strokes as possible so use some strategy. You will need to add more water, depending on how cold your butter is, moisture content of flour etc. You may need as much nearly another 1/3 cup but probably not quite that much. As soon as it starts holding together, use your hands to gather the dry flakies that resist capture and form the dough into two equal sized balls. The dough wants to be just moist enough to come together, and not so dry that your balls want to crack apart again. Press your dough balls into flattened rounds and proceed to rolling it out if you are ready. If you aren't, wrap your flattened rounds in plastic and refrigerate (can be made a couple days ahead).
For the filling
Melt the butter and if your honey is thick and creamy, let it heat along with butter so that it is easier to blend with the apples. No need to heat it lots, just enough to make it pour easier. Pour the honey/butter mix over the apple slices in a large bowl and mix to coat. Add the flour, cinnamon, lemon juice.
Assemble your pie and bake at 425°F in the middle of your oven for 30 mins. Then turn the temp down to 350°F and bake until lightly browned and bubbling - another 15-25 mins.
Ginger-Glazed Turnips, Carrots, and Chestnuts
This classic technique of covering simmering vegetables with a parchment-paper round (known as a cartouche) yeilds perfectly moist, evenly cooked pieces. The glaze takes some of the "bite" away from the turnip.
1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, cut into 1x1 inch strips
1 pound carrots, peeled, thinly sliced on a diagnoal
12 tbsp (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into 1 inch pieces, divided
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled, very thinly sliced
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 cup shelled roasted chestnuts from a jar
2 tbsp minced assorted herbs (such as flat-leaf parsley, tarragon, and chives)
Cut a 12 inch round of parchment paper; snip a hole about the size of a quarter in the center of round.  Combine turnips, carrots, 8 tbsp butter, brown sugar, and ginger in a 12 inch skillet.  Season with salt and pepper.  Rest parchment paper on top of vegetables (don't cover with lid).
Simmer over medium-high heat until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 5 minutes.  Discard parchment; add remaining 4 tbsp butter and chestnuts.  Simmer, swirling pan often, until a glaze forms, 8-10 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper.  Transfer to a large bowl.  Serve, garnished with herbs. 
Beets with Pistachio Butter
This is a huge hit every Thanksgiving! It's super simple - cook the beets (roasted or boiled) and add the pistachio butter! Eat the beets hot or cold. From Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything Vegetarian
4 large or 8 medium beets
½ cup neutral oil like grapeseed or corn or pistachio oil
4 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
1 cup shelled pistachios (can also substitute walnuts)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Bake the beets in covered roasting pan at 400 until tender about 45-90 minutes. Meanwhile, put half the oil in a skillet over medium heat. When hot, add garlic and cook for about a minute, then add pistachios; cook, stirring often, for about 3 minutes.
Remove from heat, let cool a bit, and transfer to a food processor. Puree until smooth, adding more oil as necessary; the consistency should be thinner than that of peanut butter, just pourable. Taste and adjust. 
The pistachio butter can be covered and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.
Slip the skin off of beets and cut them into chunks. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Put the beets in a serving dish and spoon the pistachio butter over the top; garnish with chopped pistachios. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Now available in the Online Market - handmade wreaths by Anners and Danika Johnson! Three styles of evergreen wreaths available for delivery with your CSA. Check them out!
Place your order by noon on Monday for a Wednesday (or Thursday) delivery!

Pantry Lore

This week we top off your Thanksgiving needs! Fresh, local cranberries from Fairfax, delivered by Cranberry Bob himself! Even though it's a native fruit of Vermont, it's actually not that easy to find local VT cranberries. Bob Lesnikoski aka "Cranberry Bob" provides us with this week's Vermont grown cranberries, freshly packed at Vermont Cranberry Co. With cranberries, size does matter so at VT Cran Co, the 30,000 pound harvest is meticulously sorted with only the biggest and best offered up locally for sale. These cranberries are meatier and pack more flavor than their southern Cape Cod counterparts. Bob's claim to fame is the "bounce". As he explains a bouncy cranberry is the best cranberry. With that said we hope you enjoy these bouncy berries over Thanksgiving. If you do not wish to use your berries for T-day you may store your berries in the fridge for up to 2-3 weeks or in the freezer for longer term storage. Cranberry sauce is super easy to make, see the recipe section for a how to. Or follow Bob's recipe right on the box.
Check out this 2013 article written by Tracy Medeiros featuring Cranberry Bob.
Cheese this week is from Sweet Rowen Farmstead in West Glover. You'll receive either Mountain Ash or Storm. Our friend Paul Lisai at Sweet Rowen Farmstead is in the new generation of dairy farming and also operates an artisan creamery. Please pick ONE of the two types of cheeses. We wish we could give you both, but unfortunately we're limited to one! The Mountain Ash is made with an edible ash dusted bloomy rind. Storm is a creamy, rind-ripened cheese described by our master storage crop mover Alison as "like eating a cloud". Both are made with Paul's heritage lineback cows milk. Either one you choose, please don't waste the rind! The rinds are completely edible and 100% delicious. Both are elegant complements to a cheese plate.
You will also receive Cortland Apples from Champlain Orchards of Shoreham VT, which will make great baking apples for your homemade apple pies this week. Champlain Orchards grow a variety of tree fruits using ecologically sound practices so that you can feel good about sharing their fruits with your family and friends. Cortland apples are a cross between McIntosh and Ben Davis apples, and "exhibit a sweet vinous flavor and crisp refreshing bite." And, Tangletown Eggs help pull your baking together.
Cranberry Sauce
This is a tried and true, simple cranberry sauce recipe. I make this sauce every year or so and can lots of it so I can pull out a jar whenever needed. It will also freeze great and keeps in the fridge for a long time too. If you want to get a little more fancy add some apple pieces and raisins or spice it up with cloves, allspice and ginger.
3 cups cranberries
1.5 cups water
1 to 1.5 cups sugar
Boil sugar and water together 5 minutes; add cranberries and boil without stirring (5 minutes) until all skins pop open. Remove from heat when popping stops and allow the sauce to cool.
Cranberry Curd
 1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 (12-ounce) package fresh cranberries
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
2 large egg yolks
1 large egg
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Grand Marnier
Combine first 3 ingredients in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer 5 minutes or until cranberries pop. Place cranberry mixture in a blender or food processor; process until smooth. Strain cranberry mixture through a fine sieve over a bowl; discard solids.
Combine sugars and butter in a bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed until well combined. Add egg yolks and egg, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in cranberry mixture, cornstarch, and salt. Place mixture in the top of a double boiler. Cook over simmering water until a thermometer registers 160° and mixture thickens (about 10 minutes), stirring frequently. Remove from heat; let stand 5 minutes. Stir in liqueur. Cover and refrigerate up to 1 week.