Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - January 30, 2019


In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Shoots, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Carrots, Green Cabbage, Cippolini Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach or Zucchini

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Shoots, Rutabaga, Carrots, Green Cabbage, Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach or Zucchini

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Shoots, Spinach, Green Cabbage, Black Radish, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach or Zucchini

Pantry/ Localvore Items


All Souls Tortilleria Tortillas: These corn tortillas are made using a Mesoamerican recipe of corn kernels cooked in a solution of ground limestone and water, which is then ground into fresh masa with hand-carved volcanic stones. The heirloom corn is sourced from Vermont and New York farms. The tortillas are coming to you frozen and if you don't plan on eating them within the next week, it's best to keep them frozen until you're ready to enjoy.
Morningstar Farm Beans: Two types of beans going out this week - choose pinto beans or kidney beans. Morningstar is the family-run operation of Seth and Jeannette Johnson in Glover. Every year we stock up on their beans, ordering a few hundred pounds at a time to get us through the year. You're receiving two pounds of their organic Pinto Beans. Pinto beans are a popular bean and they make the base for refriend beans. I took a scan through our newsletter archive and I don't believe we've ever had these before! So please let me know what you think of them. Dried beans will last for ages when stored in an airtight container. Let them soak overnight and be sure to rinse well before cooking. Below is a recipe for Mexican Pinto Beans, made with a pressure cooker. You can also try cooking them in a crock pot or in a pot over the stove. Be sure to go through the beans before soaking to pull out any little pebbles.
1 pound dried pinto beans
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1/4 cup minced cilantro
3 clove garlic, minced
1/2 medium yellow onion, left whole
1 (4.24 ounce) can chopped green chilies
1 whole jalapeño
2 tablespoons chicken or vegetable bouillon (Better than Bouillon)
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon Kosher salt
TOPPING:
2 medium vine tomatoes, cored, seeded, and chopped
1/4 medium red onion, chopped
2 scallions, chopped
1/4 cup minced cilantro
3 ounces queso Oaxaca or mozzarella, diced 1/4-inch
8 ounces sliced avocado
lime wedges, for serving
tortillas, optional for serving
Soak the beans overnight in water. Discard the water the next day.
Set pressure cooker to saute, add the oil and chopped onion and cook until soft. Add the garlic, 1/4 cup cilantro and cook 1 minute. Set aside in a bowl.
In the pressure cooker combine the soaked beans, green chilies, jalapeño, half onion, bouillon, bay leaves and 6 cups water. Cover and cook high pressure 45 minutes.
Natural release. Discard bay leaves, half onion and jalapeño and stir in the reserved sautéed onion and season with salt.
Press saute and cook uncovered until thickened, about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Meanwhile, combine the tomato, red onion, scallion and cilantro in a small bowl.
Ladle beans into serving bowls, add the cheese and top with tomato mixture and avocado. Serve with lime wedges and tortillas if desired.
Axel's Eggs: Axel is back as our primary egg supplier for the CSA! If you don't know Axel, he's the young man who raises lots of hens in between doing his homework and being an active teenager. We love the deep yellowish-orange yolks and flavor of his pasture-raised eggs.
This summer, Seth & Jeannette hosted Green Mountain Farm to School for a meal and tour at their farm. Above, Seth demonstrates how they get the beans out of their shells. The antique machine keeps running well and the barrel provides a cost effective solution for shaking up the beans.
 

Next week is the LAST WEEK of the Fall Share!

After today, there is only ONE MORE delivery left in this season. The Fall/ Winter Share ends February 6/7. Sign up today so you can continue receiving your weekly veggie deliveries. The Spring Share runs February 13 - June 6, 2019.
During the Spring share, you can expect root veggies (carrots! onions! turnips! beets! potatoes!), cabbages, frozen summer goodness (broccoli! cauliflower! sweet peppers!), and then greens, greens, greens coming up soon! We usually have the first tomatoes and cucumbers and we're always pushing the season to see what our greenhouses will produce! Join us during this exciting season!
 

Around the Farm

Before I started working at Pete's Greens, I was a CSA member. I preferred the Spring Season because of how difficult I found it to eat local food during this time of year. I wanted access to organic, local, and seasonal veggies. I wanted diversity in my food and I wanted to "put my money where my mouth was" - literally and figuratively. I picked up at Concept2 in Morrisville. A year later, I started working at the farm and I'm so glad I came in with the experience of being a CSA supporter!
I remember one spring season and it felt like all we got were carrots and shoots! Today, as part of my job, I get the yellow Standard share so I know what it's like to get what's in your bag, and to have that be the bulk of my food for the week. Sometimes it means we get creative. We're always striving to improve the CSA and to do the best we can. This morning, you should have received a survey asking about you. You'll receive another survey at the end of the season (late next week) asking about the last 17 weeks of veggies. I hope you take both surveys as they get at different characteristics about our CSA and our members. Already, I'm reading your responses with eager anticipation.
I take my experience as a CSA member seriously and think about it when I plan out the shares or when I hear about experiences at the sites (I still cringe when I think about taking Judy Geer's kimchi, which was labeled with her name, instead of taking my own! Sorry, Judy!). I value your feedback, always, and hope you join us for our Spring season. Those fresh greens that come up in late April are such a treat, and a wonderful balance to the root veggies!
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mixed Shoots: A colorful zing of sunflower & radish shoots! I've been enjoying my shoots with slaws: shredded cabbage, grated carrots, sliced kohlrabi, and wedges of apples tossed with a light vinaigrette and shoots. The shoots provide a great color and texture against the roots.
Spinach: Surprise! We cleared out a greenhouse on Monday and harvested just enough spinach for the Lean & Green Share. Enjoy spinach two ways in this week's share!
Rutabaga: Rutabaga grows particularly well in colder climates, and is especially popular in Sweden (where it earned its second name, swede).  Rutabagas should be peeled before use. Some rutabagas may have come out of the ground with superficial worm track markings. Don't be deterred if your rutabagas have these marks. Just peel or slice off the outer layer (which you need to do anyway) and the inside should be just fine. Keep them loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your fridge and they'll last for several weeks at least. Roast it, mash it with butter, season with salt and pepper, cook it like a fry, you can't go wrong.
Frozen Spinach or Zucchini:  For either veggie, let it thaw then make sure to wring it out well before using. Try mixing the zucchini in with stir fry or make a nice loaf of zucchini bread. I often throw shredded zucchini in my waffle batter for a little extra veggie in the morning.

Recipes

Quick Pickled Carrots and Rutabaga
The refreshing crunch of these pickles is a nice change from roasted, boiled and pureed root vegetables. This is a a quick refrigerator pickle version, but you could can them if you like. You can make this with just carrots but the rutabaga adds variety and makes a nice pickle too. You could also use turnips, if you like their bite.
3 large carrots (about 3/4 lb.), peeled & cut into sticks about 3" long by 1/2" wide
1 lb. rutabaga, peeled & cut into sticks about 3" long by 1/2" wide
1 cup cider vinegar
2 cups water
1/2 cup sugar
1 TB coarse kosher salt
3 garlic cloves, smashed with the flat side of a knife
1 TB whole fennel seeds
1 1/2 tsp whole mustard seeds
1/4 tsp whole black peppercorns
1/8-1/4 tsp crushed red pepper to taste
Fresh dill sprigs and fresh fennel fronds (optional)
Prepare a large bowl full of ice water. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil over high heat, add the carrots and rutabaga (or turnips), and boil for 1 minute. Drain immediately and plunge the vegetables into the ice water to stop cooking.
In the same pot, combine the cider vinegar, water, sugar, salt, garlic, fennel seeds, mustard seeds, peppercorns and crushed red pepper. Bring the mixture to a boil and simmer for 3 minutes.
Drain the cooled vegetables and put them in a heat-resistant container along with the dill sprigs and fennel fronds, if using. Pour the hot pickling liquid over the vegetables and cool. When they are cool, cover them tightly and refrigerate for at least 12 hours before eating. The pickles can be stored in the refrigerator for about a month.
Roasted Rutabaga
Roasting rutabagas brings out their natural sweetness. You could easily bulk up this recipe by adding chopped potatoes, carrots, and any other root veggies you've got.
Rutabaga
Olive Oil
Salt
Pepper
Apple cider vinegar
Chopped Parsley
Toss 1 large peeled and cubed rutabaga with 3 tablespoons olive oil, and salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Roast at 425 degrees F until golden and soft, 40 minutes. Toss with 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and chopped parsley.
Root Veggie Gratin with Horseradish Crust
Recipe comes from the Driftless Organics CSA, a great resource for recipe ideas.
2 ½ lbs. mixed root vegetables (rutabaga, turnip, parsnip, beet, potato, etc.)
4 ounces grated cheddar cheese
3 Tbsp. flour
½ cup rye bread crumbs
2 cups whole milk, heated
1-2 Tbsp. sunflower oil
3 Tbsp. butter
⅓ cup apple cider or wine
1 Tbsp. minced garlic
⅛ tsp. nutmeg
Salt & pepper
2 Tbsp. prepared horseradish

Heat oven to 375 degrees.
Spread vegetables & garlic in large baking dish, drizzle with oil & cider or wine. Season to taste with salt & pepper, & toss well.
Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil & bake 20 minutes. Remove foil & continue to roast until vegetables are brown-tipped & tender 20-25 min.
Meanwhile, start make a white sauce by melting the butter in a saucepan. Stir in flour & cook over low heat several minutes.
Whisk in milk, bring to simmer, & cook gently 10 minutes,stirring often.
Season with salt, pepper, & nutmeg. Gently fold the sauce into the roasted vegetables.
Mix horseradish, cheddar, & bread crumbs with your fingers. Scatter the mixture evenly over the vegetables. Continue to bake until bubbly, 20- 30 minutes.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - January 23, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Shoots, Yellow Onions, Garlic, Leeks, Daikon Radish, Adirondack Red Potatoes, Chioggia Beets, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Shoots, Yellow Onions, Garlic, Parsnips, Adirondack Red Potatoes, Red Beets, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Shoots, Daikon Radish, Garlic, Orange Carrots, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Champlain Orchards ApplesauceNew item alert! This applesauce is made at Champlain Orchards in Shoreham, using their own eco-certified apples. I tasted some today - it's not your typical store-bought applesauce! This is a beautiful amber color sauce with a smooth (not gritty) texture. It's quite nice and I'm anxious to hear what you think of it, too! Keep refrigerated.
Slowfire Bakery Bread: Scott Medellin, who owns Slowfire Bakery, took some time off, and then our schedules never quite coincided, but he's back and the schedule worked to include his yummy bread! Scott bakes out of a wood-fired oven in Jeffersonville, VT, on the road up to Smugglers' Notch Ski Resort. From Scott: the bread this week is theRye Porridge Bread: country sourdough with fully cooked rye flake porridge mixed in. The porridge softens the crumb and adds an earthy, spicy aroma, which should be nice for the cold days we’re having!
Cellars at Jasper Hill Little Hosmer: Two cute little cheeses named for a cute little pond and big pond) here in Craftsbury. Hosmer Pond is just a couple miles down the road from us and is a favorite spot for locals and visitors. It's also a part of the Craftsbury Outdoor Center. In the summer it's used for boating and sculling and in the winter for ice fishing and skiing. This cheese was an experiment that seems to have stuck. This cheese is a smaller version of the popular Moses Sleeper, a brie-style cow's milk cheese. Each pantry member gets TWO.
 

Sign up for your Spring Share Today!

Don't miss a week without your Pete's share! The Fall/ Winter Share ends February 6/7. Sign up today so you can continue receiving your weekly veggie deliveries. The Spring Share runs February 13 - June 6, 2019.
 

Around the Farm

This week we received an annual report of what our farm contributed to Salvation Farms. Salvation Farms is a gleaning organization that works largely in the Lamoille Valley (which includes Craftsbury) but with a presence across Vermont. Readers of this newsletter may recall that we work with SF on field gleans and wash house gleans (un-sellable produce we have after our packing days). In 2018, we donated almost 40,000 pounds of produce! This produce is then distributed to over 30 organizations in the area, including senior programs, food shelves, children's food programs, schools, and more. This is a lot of produce that otherwise would not have found its way to Vermonters.
While we're proud of the partnerships we have with Salvation Farms and dozens of other churches, non-profits, workforce development programs, and food shelves that we donate to, we also know we can do more to make local food more accessible and not rely quite so much on the charitable food system.
In my off-time, I am working on a "food access planning" toolkit that will help communities integrate food access into their municipal planning efforts. This project is part of the Vermont Farm to Plate Network. Last week I had the opportunity to testify before the Legislature on the value of this toolkit and the Network - and of course to represent our farm. The toolkit will be ready by this summer and is full of actionable ideas to address hunger in our communities.
Last summer I had a conversation with Pete about why our farm partners with Salvation Farms and other organizations on food access. His answer? "Because it's the right thing to do."
In the spirit of our friend Enid Wonnacott, an advocate of the organic and local food movement who led NOFA-VT and was instrumental in forming the Farm to Plate Network, who recently passed away, I encourage all of us to think about doing the right thing when we have more than we need.
~ Taylar
Ceres is the Roman goddess of agriculture. She was recently reinstalled atop the state house dome after being re-carved in 2018. Our state's economy is driven by agriculture, and when you choose to support farms like ours, you're supporting our local and state economy! We thank you!
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mixed Shoots: A colorful zing of sunflower & radish shoots! I've been enjoying my shoots with slaws: shredded cabbage, grated carrots, sliced kohlrabi, and wedges of apples tossed with a light vinaigrette and shoots. The shoots provide a great color and texture against the roots.
Daikon Radishes: This large root looks like an overgrown white carrot, but it is actually a radish. In Korea, cubed daikon radish is used to make a type of kimchi. Its mild taste makes it an excellent palate cleanser. In Japan, strings of daikon marinated in vinegar typically accompany sashimi. Try serving the radish in light salads where its own flavor won't be overwhelmed by the other ingredients. I suggest peeling it as the exterior is a little rough, but underneath you'll be surprised! You can cook it or grate it and eat raw. Wrap the unwashed root in a plastic bag and place it in the refrigerator, where it will keep for up to two weeks.
Adirondack Red Potatoes: Adirondack Red potatoes have a bright red skin and an even more vibrant interior! Use these purplish red potatoes, which do lighten some after cooking, as vibrant home fries for dinner or breakfast. Store in a cool, dry, dark place.​
Frozen Sweet Peppers: Colorful sweet peppers, grown on our farm and frozen in our on-farm kitchen! We preserve the harvest by freezing some of our favorite summer veggies to enjoy in the off-season. Depending on how you use these peppers, you can thaw them first or throw them into your dish frozen. I like them on nachos, in black beans, and in tacos but you can throw them into your tomato sauce or into a stir-fry.

Recipes

Shoots Salad with VT Vinaigrette
Here's a member submitted recipe. 
3 parts canola oil or oil of your choice
2 parts apple cider vinegar
1 part maple syrup
salt and pepper to taste
garlic (minced or powder to taste)
Try putting some VT Vinaigrette on the coarsely chopped shoots about an hour before serving as a side salad - toss in a few sliced almonds, maybe some croutons, maybe some feta cheese...or serve with some nice fresh bread. 
Daikon with Tahini Dressing
Serves 4
4 inches daikon, cut into matchstick-sized strips
3/4 cup thinly sliced red radishes (optional)
1 medium carrot, grated (about 1/2 cup)
1/4 cup tahini
4 scallions, thinly sliced
1 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 1/2 lemon)
1 tablespoon dry sherry or vermouth
dash salt
sugar
1/4 cup chopped almonds
1. Combine daikon, red radish, and carrots in a medium bowl.
2. Whisk the tahini, scallions, lemon juice, sherry, salt, and sugar to taste in a small bowl until well combined. Thin the dressing with a few tablespoons of water until the mixture is a smooth paste.
3. Toss the dressing with radishes until well combined. Garnish with almonds if desired.
Stir-Fried Daikon
Serves 4
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 cup sliced scallions
1 medium daikon, thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
10–12 red radishes, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar

1. Heat the peanut oil in a wok over high heat. Add the scallions; stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the daikon and red radishes; stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the water and continue stir-frying until all the water has all evaporated.
2. Add the soy sauce, sugar, and chili oil, mixing everything together vigorously and cooking for 30 seconds more. Immediately transfer to a serving platter. Serve hot.
Daikon Raita
A raita is a yogurt-based condiment served alongside spicy dishes. It can be used either as a sauce or a dip.
1/3 cup shredded daikon
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1/4 tsp salt
1 TB freshly squeezed lemon juice
Place shredded daikon in a kitchen towel and squeeze out extra moisture. Mix together all the ingredients and refrigerate at least 30 minutes to allow flavors to blend. Bring to room temperature before serving.
Marinated Beets
A little sugar softens the edge of the vinegar here and complements the natural sweetness of the beets. Keep these on hand for healthy snacks, or add to salads.
1 bunch beets
1/3 cup red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar
Salt to taste
2 garlic cloves, cut in half
2 teaspoons sugar
Place the beets in a saucepan, cover with water, add 1/4 cup of the vinegar and salt to taste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer until tender, 30 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the beets. Remove from the heat, add the garlic to the pot and set aside to cool.
Remove the beets from the pot (do not drain), slip off the skins and cut in wedges.
Combine the remaining vinegar and the sugar. When the sugar has dissolved in the vinegar, stir in 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid from the beets. Toss with the beets and the garlic. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, then remove the garlic from the marinade. Remove the beets from the marinade with a slotted spoon to serve.

Skin-on Garlic Mashed Potatoes & Parsnips
Author: Dani Lind, Driftless Valley Organics
2 lb. red potatoes
1 lb. parsnips
5-7 whole cloves garlic, peeled
4 Tbsp. butter
1 c. milk or half & half
¼ c. sour cream
salt & pepper to taste
Instructions
Scrub potatoes & cut into 2” pieces. Scrub parsnips & cut into similar sizes.
Place cut potatoes, parsnips, & whole peeled garlic cloves into a medium sauce pan & cover with salted water.
Bring to a boil covered, lower heat, & simmer uncovered for about 10-15 minutes, until vegetables are tender.
Drain water & mash vegetables & garlic with the remaining ingredients.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - January 16, 2019


In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Shoots, Napa Cabbage, Shallots, Garlic, Black Radish, Carrots, Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels sprouts

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Shoots, Leeks, Garlic, Napa Cabbage, Carrots, Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels sprouts

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Mesclun, Shoots, Black Radish, Leeks, Napa Cabbage, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels sprouts

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Butterworks YogurtWe have Butterworks Yogurt this week. At Butterworks Farm in Westfield, Jack and Annie Lazor milk a small herd of Jerseys, all of whom are born on the farm and are fed an entirely organic diet of feeds grown on the farm. Milk from Jersey cows is rich, with a high protein count and fat content. This makes their yogurt richer than others. The non-fat yogurt produced by Butterworks is the only non-fat yogurt on the market that does not contain milk thickeners like whey protein or dry milk. Their whole milk yogurt is made from just that - whole Jersey milk straight from the cows, so the yogurt comes with a cream on top and a butterfat content of 5% - a very high amount. There will be a mix of yogurts at the sites this week - this yogurt is so good it can be breakfast, morning snack, lunch, or dessert. You'd be hard pressed to find a yogurt on the market that is made with such a small carbon footprint... Butterworks is powered by renewable energy, certified organic, and committed to farming practices that are healthy, safe, and improve environmental impact.
Dried Cranberries: are coming to you from the VT Cranberry Company. Even though it's a native fruit of Vermont, it's actually not that easy to find local VT cranberries. Bob Lesnikoski aka "Cranberry Bob" provides us with this week's Vermont grown dried cranberries. Bob takes his cranberries, lightly sweetens them and dries them out for you to enjoy. The cranberries are wonderful added to baked goods, salads (see recipes below), in oatmeal, baked goods, or just eaten plain.
Eggs: Farm fresh eggs from Axel's Eggs this week! Axel is an aspiring entreprenuer who runs his egg business from his family's farm.
 

Only 4 deliveries left of the Fall Share!

Sign up today for your Spring CSA! The Fall/ Winter Share ends February 6/7.Sign up today so you can continue receiving your weekly veggie deliveries. The Spring Share runs February 13 - June 6, 2019. This is a great time to take advantage of the changing seasons as fresh greens burst onto the scene.
 

Around the Farm

Freezing freezing temperatures are causing our greenhouses to work overtime. Even so, we did lose some greens so you'll notice shoots in your bags this week. These are a fun treat to enjoy as a shoots salad or when added to other dishes.
As you might imagine, it's not always easy work at the farm. We work hard during the workday and off the farm, we like to have some fun. Some of our crew who don't have family nearby spent a weekend in Burlington over Christmas. On Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the winter, Pete and Isaac lead teams at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center in some competitive (but fun) games of broomball for community members and farm workers. Maybe I'll try to get some pictures tonight! On Wednesdays we often go shopping in Morrisville and grab some pizza and on Thursdays, there's trivia at the Highland Lodge. If you're ever in Greensboro on a Thursday evening, come join us for some fun mind-exercises and some tasty local brews! And of course, you never know who you might run into at the Craftsbury General Store or C Village Store, both informal community meeting spaces. As you drive through the village, you might bump into Tim working on one of his antique cars. Life in our small town stays busy! The work hard, play hard motto rings true here all year round.
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: This mix consists of lettuce, cress, brassica mix, and shoots.
Mixed Shoots: A colorful zing of sunflower & radish shoots! These are grown in organic soil under tightly controlled conditions. Flavorful and healthy.
Black Radishes: Black radishes are firmer, drier, and stronger than other radishes - this is a very different radish from your red/pink globes! You can eat these raw or cooked but they are bitter when eaten raw. Try shredding them to add to a salad, slaw, or relish (peeled or unpeeled), or peel and slice thin, then salt and drain and mix with sour cream as a spread for chewy rye bread. Or, blend minced radish with creamy cheese, smoked fish, or pate. Cooked black radishes taste like turnips but with less reliable cooking time. You can add them to soups, stews, braises, or stir-fries, or chop finely and add to ground raw meat. Wrap unwashed, topped radishes in newspaper or perforated plastic and refrigerate. Don't let them get moist or they will mold. Their taste mellows as they store and are fine for grating and shredding even after months of storage. I recommend scrubbing them before eating, especially if you keep the peel on.
Russet Potatoes: Also known as Idaho or baking potatoes, Russets are in the class of starchy potatoes, as opposed to waxy varieties like red and fingerling. They are high in vitamin C and B6, as well as natural sugars. Russets make great baking potatoes, and are ideal for mashing and making fries. Store potatoes in a cool dark place. Storing your potatoes in the refrigerator can make their starch turn to sugar and therefore should be avoided as doing so can give the russet potato an unpleasant, sweet taste.

Recipes

Curry Carrot-Leek Soup
1 pound thinly sliced leeks, white parts only
1 pound carrots, coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons butter or stick margarine
1 medium potato, peeled and diced
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
In a large saucepan, saute leeks and carrots in butter until leeks are tender. Add potato and curry powder; cook and stir for 2 minutes. Add broth, salt and pepper; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until the vegetables are very tender. Cool slightly. Process in batches in a food processor or blender until pureed. Return to the pan; heat through.
Wheat Berry Salad with Cranberries, Green Onion, Toasted Pecans, and Feta
Dressed with a simple balsamic vinaigrette, this no-fuss salad is a breeze to whip up. The cranberries added a touch of sweetness to the mix, and all the savory, tangy, crunchy, nutty components played nicely together.
The wheat berries take about an hour to cook through, so you want to get these going first. Rinse the wheat berries, then, in a saucepan, combine them with the water and salt. Bring to a rolling boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for one hour or until tender. All the liquid should be absorbed.
Meanwhile prepare the vinaigrette by whisking together the balsamic vinegar, olive oil, mustard, and honey. Set aside.
Combine the cooked wheat berries, green onion, cranberries, pecans, and feta. Dress with as much vinaigrette as you’d like. I use about ½ the amount this recipe makes


Shoots Salad with Dried Cranberries and Roasted Parsnips
Feel free to get creative with this salad. You can roast any of your veggies to beef it up a bit.  
6 TB cranapple or apple cider
3 TB apple cider vinegar
salt and pepper to taste
1 small shallot, minced
7 TB sunflower or extra-virgin olive oil
1 TB butter
2 parsnips, peeled and cut into 1" slices
Shoots
1/2 cup dried cranberries
Whisk cider and vinegar in bowl. Add minced shallot, salt and pepper. Gradually whisk in oil. Rewhisk before using. Preheat oven to 450°F. Combine parsnip cubes and butter, salt and pepper; toss to coat. Roast for 20 to 40 minutes untl tender.
In a large bowl, toss shoots with half of dressing. Divide among plates; top with parsnips. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with dried cranberries.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com