Wednesday, September 26, 2018

ONLY ONE MORE DELIVERY LEFT IN THIS SHARE SEASON!
SIGN UP TODAY TO KEEP YOUR WEEKLY DELIVERIES COMING!

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Mesclun, Sweet Red Pepper, Celery, Salad Turnips, Edamame, Cauliflower, Carrots, Red Onions, Delicata Squash
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
6 ears Corn

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Mesclun, Red Peppers, Broccoli, Beets, Red Onions, Spaghetti or Delicata Squash
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Corn


Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Mesclun, Dill, Zucchini, Poblano Peppers, Hot Pepper Mix, Broccoli, Edamame, Shallots, Squash
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Corn

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Mesclun, Carrots, Broccoli, Peppers, Chard, Sweet Salad Turnips






Bread Share

Mansfield Breadworks


Pete's Pantry

Cellars at Jasper Hill Hartwell, Mansfield Breadworks English muffins, Eggs

Cheese Share

Cellars at Jasper Hill
Hartwell

The Fall/ Winter Share starts in just TWO WEEKS! Sign up today for your share of our harvest! This is such a great time to be a CSA member as we welcomed autumn officially this week. Honor the bounty of the harvest by signing up for anther 17-weeks of organically grown veggies so you can continue to eat locally all winter long!
Sign up today and get your payment in this week to keep your shares coming!
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.

Potato Problem

Last week, a few members sent pictures of the inside of their Red Norland potatoes. We discovered a problem that has affected these potatoes from the inside, leaving a black ring of rot under the skin. Upon investigation, something is affecting these potatoes from the inside, leaving a black ring of rot under the skin, only in this variety and only some of the plantings. We are continuing to research and test our potatoes to figure out the cause. We will do our best to catch any problems in the future!
If your potatoes last week were bad, please let me know and we will replace them! Thanks.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Sweet Salad Turnips: Tender, fresh dug Sweet Salad Turnips can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw they have a texture similar to a radish, but are not so sharp. Or slice, dice, or quarter them and saute with butter or oil. Cook until just tender and still a little crisp. Just a little salt or maybe a little bit of vinegar is all they need. Cooked with butter and given a slight drizzle of honey and even picky little eaters may gobble them up. Don't forget the greens! Turnip greens are tender and flavorful. Chop and saute with the turnips for a side dish, or cook up with other greens, or by themselves. They make a great addition to pasta sauces too. 
Squash: Two varieties are going out this week: the favorited Delicata and Spaghetti squash, by popular demand! Last year at the end of the Fall/ Winter season, members responded to the survey saying they wished we grew spaghetti squash. So... this year we grew spaghetti squash for the CSA! You're getting our only distribution of it! Some members will receive delicata instead. Delicatas are a delicious heirloom variety and wholly edible. They are a crowd pleaser, with a mild but flavorful taste. Try halving it the long way, scooping out the insides, and roasting it with butter or olive oil or slicing it into rings. You can eat it as is or fill it and cook it stuffed with vegetables, meat, or grains. Both are great squash to roast and eat with little more ingredients needed. Neither variety lasts a long time, so enjoy in the couple of weeks.
Cauliflower: To plain cook cauliflower, steam it in a heavy pot of boiling, salted water for about 5 minutes to maintain its crispness and nutty flavor. Do not overcook as no one enjoys mushy cauliflower. I love cauliflower roasted in the oven with olive oil, and a little blue cheese melted on top (add about halfway through cooking). I learned this from a former employee of ours. Store it in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.
Shallots are a member of the alium family being similar to both garlic and onions. They grow in cloves similar to garlic and have a sweet, mild flavor like a sweet or Spanish onion. They are well known for their ability to be caramelized or cooked down to where the sugars are reduced or concentrated. When eaten raw, they are much sweeter and milder than even sweet onions. You can slice them thin and saute them in recipes that benefit from a sweet, mild onion flavor. When minced, they are fantastic in homemade vinaigrette and pan sauces. Store them in a cool, dark place.
Edamame:  Soybean varieties grown for eating the beans from the pod are called edamame. Long common in the Japanese diet, in recent years edamame has been gaining popularity in the US and now I see kids in daycare with their little containers of beans for lunch. And no wonder because it's incredibly easy to prepare, the beans are delicious, and they pack a lot of nutrition into a very small package. A half cup of shelled edamame (from approx 1.25 cups of pods) contains 9 g fiber, 11 g protein, and a good amount of Vitas A and C. Edamame freezes really well too. Just blanch pods in boiling water for 2-3 mins, drain and cool in ice water, and freeze in a single layer, then bag. Edamame should not sit in the fridge for days before you get around to eating it. Like all beans they are better the fresher they are. If you won't eat them in the next few days, freeze them!
Red Beets: Yellow bags receive some red beets this week. You'll notice some pretty enormous beets in your bag! Large ones are about 2 pounds each, or you may receive 2 - 3 smaller ones. If you're a borscht eater, this is the beet for you! If not, I've included other beet recipes below.

Featured Recipes

Caramelized Shallots
What to do with all the shallots besides tossing them into a stir fry? Make these caramelized shallots! This recipe, from the Smitten Kitchen, is a great way to maximize the sweetness of the shallots.
6 tbs unsalted butter
2 pounds fresh shallots, peeled, with roots intact
3 tbs sugar
3 tbs good red wine vinegar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 tbs chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Melt the butter in a 12" oven-proof saute pan, add the shallots and sugar, and toss to coat. Cook over medium heat for 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the shallots start to brown. Add the vinegar, salt and pepper and toss well. 
Place the saute pan in the oven and roast for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on the size of the shallots, until they are tender. Season, to taste, sprinkle with parsley, and serve hot.
Pasta with Edamame and Tomatoes
8 ounces uncooked whole wheat linguine
1-1/2 cups frozen shelled edamame
4 green onions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup white wine or reduced-sodium chicken broth
3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
Cook linguine according to package directions, adding edamame during the last 5 minutes; drain, reserving 1/2 cup cooking liquid.In a large nonstick skillet, saute onions in oil until tender. Add the tomatoes, garlic, oregano and salt. Add wine and reserved cooking liquid; cook and stir for 2 minutes.Add linguine and edamame; cook and stir 2-3 minutes longer. Remove from the heat. Sprinkle with cheese and basil; toss to coat.
Twice-Cooked Beets in Chianti Glaze
The wine glaze both balances the natural sweetness of the beets and intensifies the savory beet flavor. This dish and perhaps some smashed new potatoes would make a fine meal with a roast chicken or other fowl. From the October 2003 Bon Appetit. Makes 6 servings
8 2 1/2-inch-diameter beets, trimmed, scrubbed
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 medium leeks or a bunch of small (white and pale green parts only), trimmed, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
2 cups Chianti or other dry red wine
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter
Preheat oven to 450°F. Toss beets with 2 tablespoons oil in 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Roast beets uncovered until tender when pierced with knife, about 1 hour. Cool beets slightly, then slip off peel. Cut beets into quarters.
Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add leeks and saute until translucent and tender, about 12 minutes. Add beets to skillet; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Saute 5 minutes. Add Chianti and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until wine almost evaporates and glaze coats beets, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes. Add butter and stir until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl and serve.
Bake them in foil packets and moisten them with the savory juice that accumulates inside as they bake.
Chocolate Beet Cake
It's a sure-fire way to get your kids to eat their beets!
2 c pureed cooked beets
1/2 c chocolate chops
1/2 c cocoa powder
1/2 c (1 stick) butter
1 c sugar
3 eggs
2 tsp vanilla
2 c whole wheat pastry flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
Preheat oven 350F. Grease a bundt pan.
Steam 5 or 6 beets until tender, peel and puree until quite smooth. Set aside.
In a sauce pan, melt chocolate, cocoa, and butter together until just smooth. Using a mixer, beat eggs until light yellow and very foamy. Slowly beat in sugar until very fluffy and pale yellow. Combine beets, vanilla, and chocolate. Whisk flour, soda, and salt. Fold into eggs in this order: 1/3 chocolate beets, 1/2 flour, alternating until all is incorporated. Use a light quick hand with a rubber spatula, cutting down into the center and scooping up towards the outer edge of the bowl. Combine well, but don't over mix.
Pour into greased pan and bake until a skewer comes out clean from the center; at least 35 minutes, up to 50. Watch carefully after 35 minutes. Cool on a rack, then loosen the center with a knife and turn out onto a plate.
Drizzle with ganache:
Over a double boiler heat 2/3 c milk or cream to a bare simmer. Add 5 oz bittersweet chocolate. Stir to melt, adding more milk or chocolate to get a smooth pourable consistency.

Beet and Cabbage Borscht
Borscht began its existence in Eastern Europe from trimmings of cellared vegetables consumed throughout the winter months. Most families had a container, usually a kettle or stove pot, kept outside to store those trimmings. Around the first spring thaw, that pot was placed on the fire and cooked into a soup-like meal. One of the primary vegetables of the Slavic diet consumed during the winter months was the beet but other vegetables such as cabbage, potato and carrots were often included. The beet color was most predominant and hence, the recipe changed into what is traditionally known as a beet soup. Borscht is a great cold weather way to enjoy those winter veggies. There are many variations of borscht. This recipe was adapted from Vegan Express: Featuring 160 Recipes for Quick, Delicious, and Healthy Meals, by Nava Atlas. 
3 Tbs sunflower oil
3 c potatoes, peeled, chopped
1 c parsnip, chopped
3 c chopped cabbage (about 1/2 cabbage in this week's share)
1 large onion, chopped
8 cups (or more) canned broth (chicken, veggie, miso consumme (see below) or water)
3 c beets, peeled, chopped
1 c chopped tomatoes (drained) or tomato puree

1 Tbs fresh lemon juice
Sour cream or plain yogurt
Chopped fresh parsley
Lemon wedges
Heat oil in heavy soup pot over medium-high heat. Add potatoes, cabbage and onion and saute until cabbage softens, about 5 minutes. Add broth, beets and tomatoes. Bring soup to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes.
Working in small batches, puree 4 cups of soup in blender; return to remaining soup in pot. If desired, add more broth by 1/2 cupfuls to thin soup. Add lemon juice; season with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Top with dollop of sour cream or yogurt; sprinkle with parsley. Serve, passing lemon wedges separately.

 

Pantry Lore 

This week we feature two bread items from Mansfield Breadworks, based out of Harvest Market in Stowe on the Mountain Road. Pantry/ Localvore members will receive a 6-pack of English Muffins, made fresh this morning by Bill Hoads at Harvest Market. These muffins are made with organic Meunerie Milanaise winter wheat and unbleached white flour from Quebec, plus Cabot Creamery butter, local eggs, yeast, and salt. They are delicious! If you can't enjoy them within the week, you can easily put them in the freezer and pull them out as needed.
Localvore/Pantry/ Cheese share members all receive Hartwell (named for a local pond), a bloomy rind cheese from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. Here's how Katie from Jasper Hill sold me on it: Hartwell is an exclusive product we make for Whole Foods Markets. It’s a Little Hosmer (4oz) that is washed with lees from Shacksbury Cider. It’s the perfect September Vermont cheese! Everyone is receiving 3 pieces of these; please make sure you take 3! We're pretty lucky to have this variety as it's not often available outside of Whole Foods! 
Rounding out your share are fresh eggs from Maple Wind Farm, Besteyfield Farm, Tangletown Farm, and Axel's Eggs!

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - September 19, 2018

ONLY TWO MORE DELIVERIES LEFT IN THIS SHARE SEASON!
SIGN UP TODAY TO KEEP YOUR WEEKLY DELIVERIES COMING!


This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Kohlrabi, Chioggia Beets, Broccoli, Sweet Peppers, Poblano Peppers, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes


Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Spinach, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Carmen Peppers, Orange Carrots,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes




Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Spinach, Tomatillos, Eggplant, Lettuce, Fennel, Chioggia Beets, Garlic, Shishito Peppers, Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes


Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Spinach, Napa cabbage, Chard, Radishes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Pint Lunchbox Peppers




Bread Share

Slowfire Bakery

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Farm Yogurt, Champlain Orchards Pears, Slowfire Bakery bread

Cheese Share

Lazy Lady Farm
Geebus

Around the Farm

Busy, busy fall. Hundreds of acres of winter rye cover crop are being prepped and seeded and potato harvest starts tomorrow. It looks like a nice fat crop. We're wrapping up a bit of haying and generally are way too spoiled by the prolonged dry weather we've enjoyed all summer. Many wells in the area are dry but there has been enough moisture for good crop growth and it sure is convenient to hardly ever be rained out. Our 25 acre storage carrot crop is looking great, I have high hopes that it will come through with bigger and sweeter yields than ever. I've been looking into specialized equipment that will remove all the rocks from ag soils down to 8 inches deep. We have lots of rocky land that damages equipment and makes it hard to keep crops cleanly weeded. This would be an initially expensive, but likely very cheap in the long run, leap into clearing all our land of stones.
The field crew is tired, we're doing our best to find partial days of rest here and there but there is so much to get done.
~ Pete
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
The Fall/ Winter Share starts in just TWO WEEKS! Sign up today for your share of our harvest! Fall is always our most popular share season. You get the tail end of our summer harvest plus all the fall favorites like squash, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and the start of our root crop harvest. Potatoes are starting to come in, we have storage carrots aplenty, and on deck for harvest are parsnips, sunchokes, turnips, and more. We have greens bunches still coming in, like kale and chard, and we plan for greens every week of the share!
Sign up today so you don't forget!
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach:  A booming spinach crop this week led to a 6 am switcharoo to spinach for this week's greens!
Chioggia BeetsAn Italian variety, chioggias have alternating white and pink rings of color on the inside. The outside is lighter and more pinkish than traditional red beets. They are smooth and mild tasting. To prevent chioggias from bleeding their color, roast them whole then slice crosswise to show off the beautiful rings. Roasted this way, they make a stunning addition to a salad. Roast and store cooked chioggia beets separately from your red beets to prevent the chioggias from being dyed red.
Tomatillos:  A tomatillo is a Mexican fruit similar to a tomato that remains firm and green when ripe. Tomatillos grow inside lantern-shaped paper husks, which must be removed. Wash the tomatillos well to remove the sticky substance that keeps the husks in place. Because they are acidic, tomatillos are rarely used raw. Roast them to rid them of excess liquid and soften their texture. Roasted with some fresh chiles, they can be turned into a quick salsa in the blender. Tomatillos exude a lot of liquid and seeds as they roast. Scrape all the flavorful juices into the blender. Store tomatillos in their husks in a paper bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.
Carmen Pepper: These sweet peppers (which may be green, red, or multicolored) are a delight! The Carmen is an Italian pepper named for its bull's horn shape ('corno di toro'). These are wonderful roasted. You can freeze them whole or in slices if needed.
Eggplant: You may notice some similarities between last week's share and this week's. That's because this is the last week of our eggplants! We harvested every last one of them...  
Lunchbox Peppers: These "mini" bell peppers might look hot but they're actually quite mild! Lunchbox refers to the assortment of colors - yellow, orange, and red - that you might get. All are sweet. Try stuffing them, making a relish, or adding some pizzazz to whatever dish you're making!

Featured Recipes

Roasted Eggplant and Mushrooms with Dill Sauce
1 lb mushrooms (depending on size; portobella, crimini, or oyster are best)
1 lb eggplant, skin removed, cubed
1/4 c. butter
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 c. heavy whipping cream
1/2 c. broth (vegetable or meat)
1/4 c. white wine
1/4 c. freshly chopped dill
1/4 - 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Salt & pepper
Directions
Preheat oven to 425F.    
In a large cast iron skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and cook for about 5 minutes. Toss in the eggplant and season with salt and pepper. Cook for a few more minutes. Toss in the garlic and cayenne pepper and cook for about 1 minute.
Move the pan into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Remove and toss. Cook for another 5 minutes if necessary.
Return pan to stove. Stir in wine and cook until all liquid has almost dissipated. Stir in broth, cream, and dill. Season if necessary. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and serve over your favorite pasta or rice. Garnish with green onions.
Roasted Tomatillo Salsa
1 pint tomatillo (your shares have 1 pound)
Small onion, minced
1/2 c minced cilantro
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
Hot pepper to taste, either red pepper flakes or fresh minced chile pepper
Half carmen pepper, optional, to taste
Rinse the tomatillos and roast in their jackets @ 450 for 10 or 15 minutes. They should brown but not burst open. Cool to handle & peel off the husks. Fork mash the tomatillos in a bowl then mix in all other ingredients. Taste for salt & spice.
You can also pulse all together in a food processor.
Use this salsa with any Mexican dish, enchiladas, tacos, huevos rancheros, beans & rice, etc. Also great with grilled fish, etc.

Quinoa Stuffed Carmen Peppers
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
1 pound ground beef (optional)
1 1/2 c quinoa, prepared (optional)
2 c cheese, 1/2 reserved for top
Carmen peppers, halved and seeded
Sour cream
Cilantro
Scallions
Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Arrange Carmen peppers in a large casserole dish. Saute onions for 3 - 5 minutes until they soften and turn translucent. Add jalapeno and saute for another 3 0 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
If using ground beef, heat a skillet over medium-high heat and add a tsp of oil. Place ground beef in the pan (sprinkle with any seasoning) and stir frequently, browning and breaking apart all pieces. This should take 7 - 10 minutes.
In large bowl, combine quinoa, beef, and cheese. Stuff peppers with quinoa mix and top with extra cheese. Cover with foil, bake for 35 - 40 minutes. Remove foil for last 10 minutes of baking.
Sprinkle with cilantro and scallions, serve with sour cream and tomatillo salsa.
Braised Fennel and Potatoes
In this dish the potatoes are perked up with fennel. The fennel becomes very tender and lends loads of moisture to the dish. Gourmet February 2006.
1 large fennel bulb with fronds
1 large onion, halved lengthwise, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices (2 cups)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lb potatoes
1/2 cup water
Quarter bulb lengthwise and core, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Cook fennel, onion, pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, covered, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, about 5 minutes.Meanwhile, cut potatoes crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Add potatoes and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt to fennel mixture and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently, 3 minutes. Add water and cook, covered, stirring once, until potatoes are tender, 10 to 12 minutes more.
Italian Cauliflower
This is best when the cauliflower is just tender, not mushy. Put a couple of sausages on the grill and toss a salad. There's dinner. Serves 4.
1 cauliflower, cut into florets
3 TB oil
1 medium onion, diced
3 TB vinegar
1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes
salt & pepper
red pepper flakes
minced Italian flat parsley
Heat oil in a wide deep skillet and saute onion until translucent. Add cauliflower and a couple tablespoons of water. Continue cooking and stirring often. When cauliflower and onion begin to brown a bit, add the vinegar. Cover and cook until vinegar cooks off. Stir in tomatoes, season with salt and pepper, pepper flakes, and parsley. Simmer covered until cauliflower is tender, about 5 to 10 minutes.
 

Pantry Lore 

This week members are receiving yogurt from Butterworks Farm, pears from Champlain Orchards, and bread from Slowfire Bakery. Butterworks, in Westfield, makes the cream top yogurt you're about to dive into. Fully pastuerized, grass fed, organically raised cows! You can taste all the deliciousness in the yogurt.
Champlain Orchards in Shoreham grows fruit "eco-consciously". These pears are the Shinsui variety. This is a green-yellow pear and it both darkens and sweetens as it ripens. They're excellent for pies, if you're a baker!
Eggs are coming for Sebring Rd, Shelburne Vineyard, Charlotte, NRG Systems, Randall St, Metro Rock, and Center Rd. members.
Cheese Share members receive a piece of Sweet Geebus from Lazy Lady Farm! If you ever get the chance to meet Laini Fondillier, the owner/ cheesemaker/ head honcho over at Lazy Lady, please do! She's a real hoot. Laini is now making a goat/ sheep milk blend cheese with sheep milk from Neil Urie, who used to make cheese at Bonnieview Farm. This new one has lemon pepper on top and is ripened for 3 weeks. She said of it, "Gets kind of funky looking in a good way".