Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - June 27, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Arugula, Radishes, Peas, Cucumber, Celery, Broccoli, Kohlrabi, Cabbage, Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Arugula, Garlic Scapes, Pac Choi, Celery, Cabbage, Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes, Strawberries

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

 Arugula, Cilantro, Garlic Scapes, Pac Choi, Chard, Cabbage, Radicchio, Cucumber, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Arugula, Cucumber, Radicchio, Collard Greens, Peas (half share - see below), and Chard



Bread Share

Mansfield Breadworks Country Loaf

Pete's Pantry

Mansfield Breadworks bread, Eggs, Strawberries

Cheese Share

Bonnieview Farm
Ayresdale

PICK-UP NOTES

What to do with those bags that contain your shares each week? While we cannot reuse them for packing shares, we have a partnership with the Montpelier Food Shelf. Each week, you can return your CLEAN bags to your CSA site. We'll then get them to one of our Montpelier sites where they'll be picked up and used by clients of the Montpelier Food Shelf. It's been a great way to reuse the plastic!
Egg cartons are also something you can return to site. Clean cardboard containers can be dropped off and we'll get them to back to their respective farm for reuse!

Around the Farm

As any local food eater knows, sometimes veggies aren't always perfect - you may have seen those carrots with two legs or with a twist or potatoes that have fused together. These are usually perfectly delicious, edible veggies but they're not always desired at retail stores. You'll find them in your CSA bags but at the height of the season, we tend to select only the most perfect veggies for you! So what happens to these wonky looking veggies, or the veggies with a blemish or discoloration? In comes Salvation Farms!
All year long, Salvation Farms comes to our farm to "glean". They do this in a few different ways - Wednesday gleans from extra items or culled veggies, summre field gleans, and the Vermont Commodity Program (gaylords of carrots, potatoes, and beets shipped to Winooski). Salvation Farms processes the veggies then distributes them to charitable food organizations, schools, community care centers, child care centers, and other facilities where they're transformed into delicious, nutritious meals!
In 2017, Salvation Farms gleaned 42,000 pounds of produce from Pete's Greens! That's about 30 times heavier than a cow.
Does this sound interesting to you? I hope so! This Thursday, June 28, I'll be giving a free talk with Salvation Farms' Lamoille Valley Gleaning Coordinator, Carly Monahan, at the Morrisville Food Co-op (MoCo), 46 Pleasant Street in Morrisville. The one-hour talk starts at 5 pm. This partnership is one of the ways we're fulfilling our mission that Vermont Can Feed Itself!
~Taylar.
Last Friday, I took the very short drive to check out the strawberry harvest. I found this amazing view of our farm! The farm to the right, up close, is the "Ryan Farm," which is where VT99 raises pigs all winter long. The farm in the distance is us! Our solar paneled roof sticks out and you can see some of our greenhouses jutting out. It was a perfect summer day last Friday, not a cloud in the sky!
Below, Fransisco and Hector with strawberries!
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Arugula: Freshly harvested, field grown arugula! An early morning message from Pete while he was out harvesting extolled the beauty of arugula, so we seized the opportunity to provide you with this green, which is delicious as a salad, garnish, or sauteed. This time of year I pretty much thrive on tomato sandwiches with mayonnaise and arugula. YUM.
Tomatoes: These are red, pink, and heirloom tomatoes. Store tomatoes at room temperature.
Strawberries: There are a few main guidelines about keeping strawberries looking and tasting their best at home: keep them in the fridge unless you intend to use them within the day; don't wash them and keep the stems on until you're ready to use them; remove any that start to look sad to keep the rest of the bunch happy. I doubt you'll need these storage tips though, as you might just want to eat them right away!
Peas: there will be shelling peas in your bag! Shelling peas are about 3-5 inches long and peas can be enjoyed right out of the pod or cooked slightly. You can actually eat the pod as well but it's a bit more fibrous. We are finding our shelling peas to be incredibly deceptive to pick. We can pick 2 pods that look the same on outside and one will have nice big round peas inside and another right beside it will have small immature peas. For years we've struggled to grow peas, but this year, we did it! Please enjoy. Half of the Lean & Green Share members will get them this week, the other half will get them next week.
Garlic Scapes: We're on a garlic exploration! You've already had "green garlic," now you're getting the scapes, the tall, curly seed stalks that a garlic plant sends up at this time of year. Garlic scapes are trimmed from the garlic plants so that the plant will put energy into fattening the garlic cloves in the ground, not making seed. Garlic scapes have a nice garlic flavor, without the bite of garlic cloves. These scapes are young and tender and they may be eaten raw or cooked. You can chop and add to stir fry recipes, pasta dishes, guacamole, salsas, and vegetable dishes.
Napa Cabbage:  Napa is crisp and sweeter than regular green cabbage. It is delicious raw or cooked, and can be substituted for regular cabbage in most recipes. A head of Napa Cabbage in the fridge lends itself to a wide variety of meal options, from salads and slaws, to sandwich greens, stir fries, soup additions, and more. Nearly all of the head can be used, just not the tough center core. If your Napa sits a while in the fridge and some leaves are limp, you can refresh it with a good soak in cold water. Napa cabbage should be stored unwashed in your crisper drawer, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag.
Radicchio: A member of the Chicories family along with endive and escarole, radicchio resembles a small red lettuce. You can chop radicchio and add it to your salad for some color and extra flavor. It is also quite good brushed with olive oil before tossing on the grill. Try adding some to risotto. Keep unwashed radicchio in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer for up to a week.
Pac Choi is a member of the brassicas family along with cabbage and kale that originated in China, where it has been grown for over 1500 years. As part of the cabbage family, it packs in nutrition with high scores for vitamins A and C and calcium. Pac Choi is mild enough to be chopped up for a salad, particularly if you give it a quick wilt in a hot pan. It's also great in stir-fries and sautes and in asian soups (and other soups too). Pac Choi has a mild flavor - the leaves taste similar to Swiss chard and the stems (called ribs) are deliciously crispy and can be substituted for celery in recipes. My favorite way to cook it is to halve or quarter it lengthwise (depending on the size), brush it with olive or sunflower oil and throw it on the grill. Prepared this way, it makes an excellent and easy side. Store pac choi loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Collard Greens are a form of kale and cabbage, with a sturdier and thicker leaf than kale or cabbage. They are probably best known in America as being part of the American South cuisine, but similar varieties are also popular in the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. There are a few ways of cooking them, most commonly boiled until tender with some pork product. You can cook them slow and long or simmered in broth for 15 - 30 minutes until the texture is medium firm, like sauteed cabbage. Thinly sliced leaves can be cooked briefly, for a greener flavor and chewier texture. You can also mix them with other leaves (try your kale!) for a more complex taste. You can also blanch the leaves and use them as a wrapper (like grape leaves) or use them as a stuffing. The stalks are tough; discard and only use the leaves. Keep collards very cold. Wrap in a ventilated plastic and use fairly soon - they don't last as long as a cabbage.
Using your Share Tips: I always find it helpful to see what's in my share and think about how quickly I have to use what's in it. Unopened, the bagged greens will last a few days. I usually save those, starting with my bunched greens first. Something like the scapes can be sprinkled throughout your weekly cooking (at breakfast, in eggs; at lunch, on a salad; at dinner, cooked into your main course of veggie side). The fingerling potatoes will have a shorter shelf life, so plan to use them within 10 days. They would make a nice base for a potato salad with celery, peas, and scapes for the weekend. Fancy share members may enjoy a late week stir fry with Napa, pac choi, and cilantro. The scapes and radicchio could be grilled. The cukes will last a few days in your fridge, or try making a nice cucumber/tomato salad lightly dressed in vinegar and olive oil.

Featured Recipes

Grilled Radicchio with Balsamic Glaze
This recipe comes from Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything Vegetarian." It would be delicious sprinkled with some blue cheese. 
1 lb Radicchio, cored and quartered
1 TB sunflower oil
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1 TB honey
salt and pepper to taste
Preheat your grill to a moderately high heat. Brush the radicchio with the oil, taking care to keep the wedges in tact. Stir the honey into the vinegar and set aside. Place the radicchio wedges on the grill, cut sides down. Grill for a minute or two, then turn and brush (or drizzle) with the vinegar mixture. Cook until just starting to crisp and char around the edges, another couple of minutes. Transfer to a platter and sprinkle with salt and black pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature. Sprinkle with blue cheese, if desired.
Grilled Garlic Scapes
Garlic Scapes
1 Tbsp olive oil
⅛ tsp salt
fresh cracked pepper to taste
Wind scapes into flat spirals, which you then place on your skewers while maintaining the flat shape of the spiral. The fact that garlic scapes have a natural curl make this process a little easier.
Once skewered, brush the garlic scapes with 1 Tbsp of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill over direct medium heat for 8-10 minutes with the lid closed as much as possible, turning once or twice, until they begin to turn golden-brown. Remove from the grill and set aside.
Collard Greens with Bacon
A classic recipe

2 bunches collard greens, stemmed
3 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/2 red onion, sliced
3 slices bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch strips
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 cup homemade or low-sodium store-bought chicken stock

Working in batches, stack greens; cut crosswise into 2-inch-thick strips. Gather strips; cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces. Transfer to a large bowl of cold water; swish to remove grit. Transfer greens to a colander using a slotted spoon; let drain. Repeat until greens are free of grit.

Heat oil in a very large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and bacon; cook until onions are translucent, about 4 minutes. Add greens; cook, stirring, until greens begin to wilt and are reduced in volume.
Raise heat to high; add vinegar. Cook, scraping up brown bits from bottom of skillet, until vinegar has evaporated, about 1 minute.

Add stock; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, until greens are just tender, 12 to 14 minutes. If making ahead, refrigerate, covered; reheat over low heat.

Stuffed Collard Greens

1 can (28 ounces) whole peeled tomatoes with their juices
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
Pinch of red-pepper flakes
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup spelt
1 pound collard greens
1 1/2 cups cooked white beans, or 1 can (15 ounces) white beans, drained and rinsed
2 tablespoons finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese Regular
2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage leaves

Pulse tomatoes with juices in a food processor until chopped. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and pepper flakes; cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender, about 6 minutes. Add tomatoes; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer; cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 20 minutes. Season with 3/4 teaspoon salt. Let cool.

Stir spelt into a saucepan of salted boiling water. Reduce to a steady simmer; cook, uncovered, until tender, about 40 minutes. Drain and let cool.

Meanwhile, add collard greens in batches to a pot of salted boiling water and cook until bright green and tender, about 3 minutes. Remove with tongs and let cool. Trim off stems and thick ribs. Reserve 12 large leaves; chop any remaining leaves.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Coarsely mash beans in a bowl. Add cooked spelt, remaining 2 tablespoons oil, cheese, sage, and any chopped collards. Stir to combine. Season with 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste.

Working with one collard leaf at a time, arrange 1/4 cup filling in center. Fold stem end over filling. Fold in sides. Roll collard over to form a bundle, overlapping ends to seal. Transfer, seam-side down, to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish.

Spread sauce evenly over stuffed collards. Cover with parchment, then foil; bake until sauce is bubbling and collards are tender, about 30 minutes. Serve immediately.

Roasted Tomato and Arugula Salad
Epicurious November 2008 by Andrew Friedman
1 cup olive oil
1 large clove garlic, minced
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 lb tomatoes, in sections lengthwise lengthwise and seeded
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 1/2 cups (loosely packed) arugula
Preheat oven to 250°F. Line large rimmed baking sheet with foil.
In large bowl, stir together olive oil, garlic, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Dip tomato halves into oil, shake off excess, and arrange on baking sheet, cut sides down. Roast until skins are wrinkled and beginning to brown, about 2 hours. (Tomatoes can be roasted ahead and refrigerated, covered, up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before using.)
In large bowl, whisk together remaining 1/2 cup olive oil, vinegar, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Add arugula and tomatoes and toss to coat.
Simple Roasted Kohlrabi 
2-4 kohlrabi - outer skin trimmed to white bulb, and cut into 1/4 " thick strips
1 TB olive oil
salt and pepper 
Preheat oven to 450. Toss kohlrabi with olive oild, salt & pepper on a baking sheet. Bake until browned 15-20 mins. Works just as well tossed with oil and placed in tin foil and placed on grill.

Napa Cabbage, Kohlrabi, Carrot Slaw
Adapted from a recipe in Bon Appetit July 1998 
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2.5 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
1.5 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
1.5 tablespoons (packed) brown sugar
1 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoons minced garlic 
1 Napa Cabbage chopped
2 kohlrabi peeled and cut into matchstick size strips
1 large red or yellow bell peppers, cut into matchstick-size strips
2 medium carrots, peeled, cut into matchstick-size strips
4 scallions, cut into matchstick-size strips
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  
Whisk first 7 ingredients in small bowl to blend. (Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before continuing.) 
If you have a food processor you can use it to grate the carrots, kohlrabi and cabbage and peppers. Otherwise hand chop and mix together in a large bowl. Add dressing and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
 

Pantry Lore

Mansfield Breadworks is based out of Harvest Market in Stowe. Their bread is made fresh organic and Vermont flours. Eggs this week come from Tangletown Farm (West Glover), Besteyfield Farm (Hinesburg), and Axel's Eggs (Greensboro). Rounding out the share: strawberries! You may receive certified organic berries from Pete's Greens orBerry Creek Farm in Westfield.
Cheese share members receive a piece of Ayersdale from Bonnieview Farm. This cheese is made with milk from the farms' 15 grass-fed cows. Neil and Kristen Urie are our neighbors who run a 470 acre farm with 170 milking ewes. This cheese is buttery and smooth with a slight tang.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - June 20, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Spinach, Basil (may be IN your spinach), Romaine Lettuce, Rhubarb, Beans, Beets, Kale, Pearl Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Spnach, Basil (may be IN your spinach), Romaine Lettuce, Cucumber, Kale, Pearl Onions, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes

Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

 Spinach, Basil may be (IN your spinach), Rhubarb, Zucchini, Cucumber, Kale, Pearl Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes and Strawberries

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Spinach, Romaine Lettuce, Radishes, Pearl Onions,

OUT OF THE BAG
Tomatoes and Strawberries

Bread Share

Patchwork Farm and Bakery
Country Loaf

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Farm Yogurt, Pete's Greens Strawberries, Mary's Granola

Cheese Share

Lazy Lady Farm
Sweet Emotions

PICK-UP REMINDERS

When you arrive at your site, please look at the Weekly Names Checklist. Find your name then read across the row to see what you should take. If you signed up for a veggie share, the sheet will tell you which color bag we sent for you. This week it will also tell you to take a bag of tomatoes -- they will be left in a brown paper bag at your site - "out of bag". We do this so they won't get crushed inside the bags with other veggies.
The next column will tell you if there are any pantry items you should take. If you signed up for Pete's Pantry or a Localvore Share, you'll see items listed here for you. Then there is a column for Egg/ Bread/ Cheese shares. If you signed up for one of those add-ons, you'll see what item we sent for you. (Look for these items at your site, with a sticker with your name!) The last column tells you if there are any "Special" items to look for. This could be a bulk order or a replacement item or a special "thank you".
The first Meat Share delivery will be the week of July 4.
Once you've found your name and all your items, please cross your name off the list.Our site hosts send us a report at the end of the share pick-up so if you cross your name off, this helps us solve any mysteries at the end of the day.
If anything is missing or you don't see an item that you think should be there, please send me an email. We ask that you do not take anything if there is uncertainty. We don't send extra items to sites.
Mistakes happen. I want to make sure you get your food, so if you ever have any problems, please email me! Email is the best way to reach me.

Around the Farm

One of the things that sets Pete's Greens aside from some other CSAs is that we grow year-round, and almost everything that goes into our veggie CSA shares is grown on our farm. Our farm is located in northern Vermont, which can add a little extra complexity to the growing season, but that's what we love!
Throughout this share season, you'll have some early season crops, like rhubarb, peas, and pearl onions; and you'll have things that grow at the height of the summer, like peppers and eggplant; and then you'll have some late season crops, like cauliflower, winter squash, and cabbage. We try to extend our seasons as long as possible, growing what we can early and late into other seasons. We've gotten pretty good at it, but still we are limited. If we have any issues with crops, like last fall with the Brussels sprouts when we lost them to aphids, I'll let our members know. Still, we can't grow Brussels sprouts in April!
But we promise to grow as wide a diversity of veggies as possible to share with our members. Throughout the next 16 weeks, I hope to provide you with familiar veggies plus some of our favorites and maybe even some new varieties you and your family will enjoy!
We have room in our Summer CSA so if you have a neighbor or co-worker who might enjoy our fresh veggies, let them know it's not too late to join!
Yesterday we had a special visitor to the farm - guess she was also looking for some fresh veggies and a warm place! This snapping turtle has been living at the farm for years, but this is the first year she decided to find a spot in our parking lot. She wasn't there this morning so hopefully she's in a less traveled area to safely lay her eggs!
~Taylar
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach: Freshly harvested, field grown spinach! For raw salads or for cooking. Enjoy with some sliced strawberries for a fancy salad. Keep the greens cold once you get home; if they warm up, they'll start to deteriorate. Purple, Yellow, and Orange share members will find basil either inside their spinach bag or bagged separately.
Tomatoes: ALL Share members receive a bag of tomatoes! These are red, pink, and heirloom tomatoes. Store tomatoes at room temperature.
 Strawberries: We grew these summer favorites here on the farm, and I'm stoked to have them this week! There are a few main guidelines about keeping strawberries looking and tasting their best at home: keep them in the fridge unless you intend to use them within the day; don't wash them and keep the stems on until you're ready to use them; remove any that start to look sad to keep the rest of the bunch happy. I doubt you'll need these storage tips though, as you might just want to eat them right away!
Red Kale: Red curly kale is very similar to its cousin green curly kale, but it's red! This kale is great pan cooked to bring out its flavor or try making kale chips! Keep kale loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. Strip the leaves from the stems and wash them well before chopping and cooking.
Zucchini: This time of year, tender zukes are a treat. Store unwashed in the crisper. Use in a few days. Try grating them, and saute lightly in butter. Or eat them raw in salads. It has a delicate flavor and requires little more than quick cooking with butter or olive oil, with or without fresh herbs. The skin is left in place. Quick cooking of barely wet zucchini in oil or butter allows the fruit to partially boil and steam. Zucchini can also be eaten raw, sliced or shredded in a cold salad, as well as lightly cooked in hot salads, as in Thai or Vietnamese recipes.
Pearl Onions: These are small onions but have a mild, sweet flavor. It's so nice to have fresh onions. Use them wherever you need onions, and don't forget about the tops. You can chop the tops as far up each onion as you want to. The flavor will be zestiest at bottom and mellows as you go up.  They have a real zing and are quite a treat in salads and on sandwiches or pickled.
Bunched Beets: These bunched beets are starting to pop up! Fresh, tender beets this week, coming at you with their tender green tops still intact! These bunched beets were freshly harvested and have their tops on. You can eat beet greens as well as the roots. The tops are great in salads or sauteed. Beets are great this time of year grilled in a foil pouch with other veggies, or shaved thinly over salads. It's best to separate the greens and store beets and greens individually wrapped in plastic.

Featured Recipes

Tomato, Cucumbers, Sweet Onion Salad
Try adding feta or goat cheese if you have it. It's like eating dessert. Good balsamic is an important pantry ingredient. I have a couple that are just fantastic and I save them for recipes where their flavor makes a dish special, and I save the lesser grades for cooking with.
2 Tomatoes chopped
1 Cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped
1-2 sweet onions peeled and sliced thinly
a small handful of basil leaves
drizzle of olive oil
drizzle of good balsamic vinegar
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
1 TB honey
1 TB soy sauce
1 TB rice vinegar
2 cucumbers, peeled, cut in half, scoop seeds out, then thinly sliced
Toss together. Best after a few hours and still excellent the second day

Tomato Salad with Goat Cheese and Basil
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 garlic clove, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
3-4 medium tomatoes, cored and cut into 1/2-inch-thick wedges (about 2 pounds)
1/3 cup small basil leaves
1.5 ounces goat cheese, crumbled (about 1/3 cup)
Combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl, stirring with a whisk. Add chopped basil and tomato wedges; toss to coat. Cover and let stand for 1 hour, tossing occasionally. Top with basil leaves and goat cheese.
Strawberry-Rhubarb Compote
Makes a delicious addition to morning yogurt or oatmeal, can be used as the fruit in a quick cobbler, or on ice cream with ginger snaps! In lieu of the ginger, you can opt for a vanilla bean, split lengthwise. 
1/2 cup water
3/4 cup sweet apple cider
3 slices fresh ginger, unpeeled
1/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup honey
1 lb rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 3-inch batons, about 1/2 -inch wide
1/2 pound strawberries, hulled and quartered
optional: 1 teaspoon kirsch, or another eau-de-vie
In a large, nonreactive saucepan, heat the water, cider, ginger, sugar, and honey (use less if you want a more tart compote)
When all the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is simmering, add the rhubarb and let the rhubarb cook in the simmering syrup until it's just softened, which may take as little as 5 minutes, depending on the rhubarb. Remove from heat and add the strawberries and the eau-de-vie, if using. When cool, pluck out the ginger slices. Serve warm or store in a jar in your fridge.
Caesar Salad
Here's a Caesar salad dressing from Amy, which she's used for years, modified from the 1975 edition of the Joy of Cooking. 
Caesar Salad Dressing
Makes 1 cup dressing or enough to dress a couple large heads of romaine.
Put the following into a blender:
4 cloves garlic
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp Worcestershire
2-4 anchovy filets (I never have these and instead add 1 scant tsp anchovy sauce or 7-10 kalamata olives)
2 eggs (you can add these raw, but I cook boil my whole eggs for 2 mins and then spoon the lightly cooked egg into the blender)
Blend the above as well as possible, then with blender on low, add in a slow, steady stream:
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Add to your liking:
black pepper
more lemon juice
The Salad:
Head of Romaine Lettuce
Croutons
Grated Parmesan
Caesar salad dressing
Chop a head of romaine lettuce, rinse, and salad spin, or put in a colander to dry. (If you don't have a salad spinner and want dry lettuce quickly, you can use the towel spin method which is a good show if you have kids. Just put the washed salad greens onto a clean towel, pull together the corners and then spin in a circle and the water will fly out of the greens into a towel and often do a good job spraying the kitchen too.) Transfer greens to a bowl, add dressing, and toss to coat lettuce well. Add parm and toss again. Plate the salads and top dress with croutons and grated parm to your liking.
 

Pantry Lore

Mary's Granola is made by Mary Jane McKenzie in Greensboro. A budding entrepreneur, Mary spent her weekend and first days of summer vacation whipping up this yummy, low-fat granola. She came up this recipe to be healthy, delicious, and ready for everyday eating. It's made with organic rolled oats from Quebec, organic sesame seeds, organic sunflower seeds, organic shredded coconut, cinnamon, vegetable oil, and honey from her family's bees.
Berries are here! Yesterday morning Pete came in and said "I have some strawberries," much to my surprise! We have pints of our Pete's Greens organic strawberries for you, the first of the season. You can eat them fresh, sliced with your yogurt, or baked into a multitude of sweet treats.
Butterworks Farm in Westfield has been raising Jersey cows for decades as one of the state's earliest pioneering organic farms. This cream-top yogurt is rich, healthy, and flavorful, primarily due to the amazing growing and feeding practices used by the Lazor family. These cows are grass fed and pasture-raised. Please choose one quart.
Next door to Butterworks Farm, Laini Fondillier raises goats, cows, and chickens at her Lazy Lady Farm. For 30 years, Laini has been making artisanal, small batch cheeses. Like the Lazor family, Laini uses organic practices and is powered by renewable energy. Her Sweet Emotions cheese is made with a mix of goat and cow milks, and is a "bloomy rinded cheese with a soft and sometimes gooey texture." Yum!