Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Good Eats Newsletter - March 27, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Spinach, Chard or Kale or Brassica Bunch, Red Onions, Celeriac, and Gilfeather Turnips
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Squash

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Arugula, Braise Mix, Parsley, Red Onions, Celeriac, and Turnips (Goldball or Gilfeather)

LEAN & GREEN


Mesclun, Spinach, Chard, and Black Garlic


Pantry/ Localvore Items


Boundbrook Farms Brown Rice: Here's a new item that I'm excited for members to try! This is locally, organically grown brown rice from Addison County! Rice grows in water and needs a long, warm, wet season. Addison County farmer
Honest-to-Goodness Apple Cider Vinegar: This vinegar comes from the homestead of Jo Liddell and Bob Machim, Gingerbrook Farm, carved out of the woods of South Washington, VT 40 years ago. As they cleared for their fields, they found wild apple trees and decided to keep them. The land around their home is dotted with these old wild trees and it is from these trees and others nearby their farm that Bob makes their cider vinegar. This is the real mccoy, Honest-to-Goodness cider vinegar as they call it, a health tonic, and almost good enough to drink straight! It starts with unpasteurized apple cider that Bob seeds with a "mother" culture of yeast that ferments the cider. The difference between apple cider gone bad due to the infiltration of natural airborne yeasts and a good artisanal cider vinegar is in controlling the process. The mother culture makes a big difference, as does the fresh cider used for the vinegar, and the aging process. Bob ages this vinegar for two years and poured the beautiful amber liquid from big wooden barrels in a corner of his home. In time, you may find a slippery gelatinous mass forms in your cider vinegar. Fear not! This is just more "mother" forming in your jar. Just remove it from jar and continue to use your vinegar.
And fresh eggs from Axel and Besteyfield!
Cheese Share: Members receive Moses Sleeper from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. inspired by French brie. This cheese’s historic namesake, Moses Sleeper, and his compatriot, Constant Bliss, were Revolutionary War scouts killed while defending a blockhouse along the Northeast Kingdom’s legendary Bayley Hazen Military Road. You can eat all of this cheese (rind and all). It's best when it's allowed to come to room temperature before cutting in.

Around the Farm

Last week I was in Savannah, GA with my family. While I loved the hearty biscuits and gravy, pecan pie, and meals smothered with some kind of rich sauce, I was thrilled to come back to the CSA list for this week, filled with fresh green veggies both bunched and bagged! I had forgotten how much I love the fresh stuff, even the celeriac and turnips. There is nothing better in the spring than fresh greens.
We have an exciting announcement to share with members. In 2014, we opened the Pete's Greens Farm Market in Waterbury. Over the past few months, we realized we are farmers first and foremost. As of this afternoon, our Farm Market is now owned by Patrick Crowl and the Woodstock Farmers Market. They have a great store down in Woodstock and we know our little market will be in good hands! CSA pickups will continue, although they have moved to the barn for the next few weeks while the store is renovated. It'll be closed starting today through mid-May. We thank everyone for their support of the Market while we got it off the ground and contributed to the Waterbury/ Stowe food scene!
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: Radish and sunflower shoots, mizuna, spinach, red and green sorrel, a whole bunch of good greens in this week's mix!
Braising Greens: This is a colorful mix of kales, spinach, mustard greens, and red mizuna. It cooks down a lot! We suggest rinsing greens before eating and use within a week.
Arugula: I love a good arugula. Spicy and great fresh or cooked. Also known as Rocket or Roquette. It's a popular and versatile green that can be eaten raw, but also holds up well in the saute pan. It has a peppery, mustardy flavor and is great on sandwiches, pizza, or eggs to give them pep - or enjoy in or as a salad for a whole new experience! Arugula and red beets are a winning combination; as a salad, use the arugula as your base with diced roasted (or boiled) beets, sprinkled with toasted walnuts and a little cheese. It does well with a quick wilt and added to pastas, frittatas, or calzones, or as stand-in for lettuce on an Italian-inspired sub. It is delicious when prepared simply in a saute pan with olive oil, sprinkled with coarse salt and pepper.
Spinach: Large leaf spinach in your Fancy/ Lean & Green share is great for cooking or chopping up in salads. Wash the leaves in a sink or large bowl full of water, letting any sandy residue sink to the bottom. Lift out of the water and drain. Throwing it into a pan with a few remaining water droplets will allow it to steam nicely. Store unwashed, bagged in the crisper drawer for several days.
Black Garlic: Perhaps you've seen it in the store and thought it looked too funky to try. This is a great opportunity! Black garlic is garlic that is "caramelized" - or browned - using a slow cooking process. It's sweet and a little tangy. We recommend keeping it in the refrigerator. Try eating it as it is (peel off the skin and pop the clove directly in your mouth!) or spread it on a piece of bread. You can also use it as you would roasted garlic, as a rub on chicken or fish before roasting or mix it into dressings. If you have a favorite way to use it, please share with me!
Celeriac: Let's call this the "black sheep" of the root family. An under-appreciated root veggie that is so versatile! It's great for roasting, mashing, soup making, and more! Celeriac is a great potato substitute or try mixing it in with your potatoes. Last night I made tacos and cubed it up in small chunks, then roasted with cumin, chili powder, garlic, salt & pepper, and olive oil. It made a great filling along with some refried Jacob's Cattle beans, roasted squash, sautéed onions, and sharp cheddar cheese. Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.
Turnips: You're receiving either goldball turnips (golden yellow and round) or Gilfeather turnips (longer, pointer, and whiter in color). We're getting to the end of turnip season! I developed an affection for these guys last year. Try the recipe below - pretty simple and really tasty as a side dish!

Recipes

Mock Potato Salad
I found this recipe last year when looking for new ideas for celeriac. It sounds delightful! It's labeled "paleo" and low carb and uses a variety of items that have appeared in the share over the past couple of weeks, with root veggies substituting the potatoes. Lots of ideas for substitutions here depending what's in your fridge and how you like your potato salad. If you try it, let me know!
Spices for boiling vegetables:
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
½ tsp salt
Salad & dressing:
1 medium rutabaga
1 medium turnip
½ medium celeriac
4-6 pickled cucumbers
6 large eggs
1 small white onion
1 large celery stalk, sliced
¾ cup mayonnaise
1 tsp Dijon mustard
 2 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp celery seeds
2 tbsp each freshly chopped parsley and chives
½ tsp salt or to taste
freshly ground black pepper
Start by cooking the eggs. Fill a small saucepan with water up to three quarters. Add a good pinch of salt. This will prevent the eggs from cracking. Bring to a boil. Using a spoon or hand, dip each egg in and out of the boiling water - be careful not to get burnt. This will prevent the egg from cracking as the temperature change won't be so dramatic. To get the eggs hard-boiled, you need round 10 minutes. This timing works for large eggs. When done, remove from the heat and place in a bowl filled with cold water.
Peel the rutabaga, celeriac and turnip. Dice into ½-1 inch pieces. You may want to cut the rutabaga into smaller pieces as it takes longer to cook than turnips and celeriac. Place in a pot filled with water and add the vinegar, whole peppercorns, salt and bay leaves.
Bring to a boil over a high heat. Then, reduce the heat to medium and simmer until the rutabaga is tender for 10-15 minutes (time depends on the size of the pieces). Once cooked, take off the heat and pour through a colander. Discard the spices. Set aside to cool down and then place in a mixing bowl.
Peel and finely chop the onion and dice the pickles. Add the onion and pickled to the mixing bowl with the cooked vegetables.
When the eggs are chilled, peel off the shells. To do it, simply roll the eggs against a chopping board until the shell cracks. Remove the top part of the shell. Then, insert a spoon and run it under the shell until it falls off. This way you will avoid the egg white from sticking to the shell and breaking off.
Chop the eggs into small pieces and place in the bowl with the vegetables. Add the pickle juice (or vinegar) and mix until well combined.
Add the mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, sliced celery stalks, freshly chopped herbs and the celery seeds. Mix until well combined and season with salt and pepper to taste. For best results refrigerate and serve the next day. All the spices, herbs and vegetables will blend together and make the flavor more intense. Store in the fridge for up to 5 days.
Gilfeather Turnip Soup
Adapted from a recipe created by Greg Parks, Chef at Newfane's Four Columns Inn.
5-6 TB butter
3 large onions, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
5-6 cups unsalted chicken stock
2 lbs. Gilfeather turnips, peeled and chopped
2/3 cup half and half
scant 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, ground
salt and pepper to taste
A few handfuls of fresh spinach (or some shoots perhaps?)
Melt butter in 5 quart kettle and saute chopped onion and garlic until soft but not browned. Add stock and chopped turnips and cook until tender. Drain and reserve some of the liquid. Puree mixture in food processor until smooth. Put through a food mill or sieve and return to kettle. Add seasonings and half and half. Mix well. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary. Add reserved cooking liquid if soup is too thick. Saute spinach in a small amount of olive oil until just wilted. Use spinach as a garnish on top of the soup before serving.
Turnip Hash
This recipe is a basic recipe that can be used with turnips, rutabagas or potatoes. The stock adds flavor while cooking and softening the starch. Feel free to add any kind of breakfast meat, Anaheim peppers, greens or other veggies for a turnip hash "surprise". Serve along side eggs for a hearty breakfast or a "silly supper".
6 Tbs olive oil
1 onion, diced small
2 c turnips, diced small
2 c hot chicken or veggie stock
2 Tbs butter
1/2 c Parmesan or another hard Italian cheese
1/2 c parsley, rough chop
Salt and pepper, to taste
Warm the chicken stock in a sauce pan over medium-low heat. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet and turn the heat to medium. Toss in the onion and cook until translucent. Add the turnips and cook for 2 minutes. Ladle in some of the hot chicken stock and cook until absorbed. Continue until all of the stock has been added, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the butter and grated cheese off the heat. Garnish with parsley.
Warm Potato and Arugula Salad
3 pounds white potatoes, scrubbed
1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons grainy mustard
1 1/2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced
5 ounces baby arugula (6 cups)
Preheat the oven to 425°. Cut the potatoes into 1/2-inch wedges. Scatter the potato wedges on large rimmed baking sheets, drizzle with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil and toss until coated. Season with salt and pepper and roast for about 25 minutes, until browned and crisp.
In a small bowl, whisk the remaining 1/4 cup of olive oil with the mustard and vinegar and season with salt and pepper. In a large bowl, toss the potatoes with the onion and arugula. Top with the dressing, toss again and serve right away.
Greens With Garlic and Chile
A simple classic you can use this week with your most greens! 
1 bunch (about 1 lb.) greens of your choice
1 Tbsp. salt (for boiling water) plus more to taste
1 to 2 Tbsp. olive oil
1 to 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 to 3 whole, small dried chiles (such as arbol) or 1 fresh red chile such as fresno, sliced
Lemon juice (optional but delicious)
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile, clean greens and cut off any tough stems. Chop greens into fairly large pieces and set aside.
Add 1 tbsp. salt and chopped greens to boiling water (except for spinach, you can skip this step if using spinach). Cook until greens wilt, 30 seconds to 2 minutes depending on toughness of the greens you're using. Drain and immediately rinse with cold water until cool. Use your hands to squeeze out as much water as possible from the greens. Set aside.
Heat a large frying pan or saute pan over high heat. Add oil, garlic, and chile. Cook, stirring, until fragrant and just starting to turn golden, about 30 seconds. Add greens and stir to combine. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until greens are tender and flavors combine, 3 to 5 minutes. Serve greens hot, warm, or at room temperature.
Savory Green Sauce 
Here's a more creative and involved way to use greens, turn them into a delicious sauce to go on potatoes or rice.
2 garlic cloves, peeled
1/2 cup yogurt or sour cream
1 teaspoon freshly grated horseradish root, or use prepared horseradish
2 cups mixed cooking greens and herbs, such as a combination of fresh spinach, young kale, or mustard greens
Fit a food processor with the metal blade. With the machine running, drop the garlic through the feed tube to mince the garlic. Add the yogurt and horseradish and pulse to combine. Add the greens and process until the greens are pureed. Serve the potatoes hot, with the sauce passed on the side.
If you'd prefer the sauce hot, add a little butter to a saute pan and melt it, then carefully heat the mixture while stirring.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - March 20, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Brassica Mix, Upland Cress, Black Garlic, Mixed Carrots, Yellow Onions, Sweet Potatoes


EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Sorrel, Mixed Carrots, Yellow Onions, Sweet Potatoes, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Sweet Peppers

LEAN & GREEN

Mesclun, Brassica Mix, Radicchio, Mixed Carrots, and Mizuna



Pantry/ Localvore Items


Red Hen Baking Co Pizza Crust: Pizza party! We have a par-baked crust from Red Hen Baking Co. in Middlesex. This pizza crust is ready-to-use! Just top it and bake at 450 degrees for about 5 minutes, then turn your oven to broil for another minute or two until your cheese is golden and bubbly. If you're not able to use the crust within a couple of days, please freeze it!
Pizza Sauce: To top your crust, we have our very own, farm-made pizza sauce, made with our organic, farmgrown tomatoes, plus a garlic and spices. I found that the 16 oz container of the sauce was the perfect amount of sauce for the 16 oz crust! It's frozen, so thaw before using. I like to heat it up in a small saucepan; that also helps cook off any of the excess liquid that comes from being frozen.
The West River Creamery Marinated Feta is so good it's pretty hard to stop eating. I highly recommend making a pizza with this cheese, and then save the rest for a scrumptious pasta dish. I would also add some feta to a salad or make the dressing below. Make sure you use every drop of the oil on your pizza and in your pasta or soak it up with some bread. Good to the last drop.
Pepper starts!! With tomatoes peeking in. This is how the frozen sweet peppers begin...!

Around the Farm

Welcome, spring! We're so glad that the calendar finally says "spring" tomorrow despite our 8 degree weather this morning! We're welcoming in "Late Spring" CSA members this week and welcoming back the Lean & Green Share. We're also welcoming back Bryn, our delivery driver for Chittenden County sites! Bryn previously delivered the CSA shares back in 2015/2016. He's taking over for Steve, who left to go plant flowers.
Reminder: if you're unable to pick up your share, we need at least 1 week's notice. At the very very latest, I can't make any changes after 8 am on Monday. I try to accommodate everyone's schedules but at 8 am every Monday, I finalize our reports and paperwork, giving our harvest / prep crew enough time to harvest and wash everything we need that week. This time of year, we harvest exactly what we need! Thanks for understanding.
And it's a great habit to get into! For awhile now I've been alluding to changes coming to our Good Eats CSA. They are coming very quickly! This summer, we'll be transitioning to a new member portal where you'll be in control of your share - changing delivery dates, share types, delivery sites, contact info, and more will all be easy for you to manage. Instead of emailing me, you'll go into your account and make changes. But this will also be a firm cutoff and I won't be able to make exceptions. There are more exciting changes coming (think: no more writing out paper checks every 17 weeks! No more veggies you don't like!) but there's enough of a teaser for now!
~ Taylar
This morning I helped Melissa uncover the starts in our "headhouse". We all enjoy the heat and sun in there!

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: This week is a great "kitchen sink" mesclun! It has a little bit of everything... shoots, baby kale, spinach, cress, red and green sorrel, red and green mizuna... hearty yet refreshing! We recommend rinsing the greens before eating. Store in the fridge.
Cress: This upland cress has a deep pungency with a unique twist between arugula and horseradish, pledging its allegience to the mustard family. Cress is indeed rich in vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, and calcium. Try it on sandwiches or in salads, in soups, or with cooked meat, poultry, and fish.
Brassica Mix: This week we were cleaning out a bed of Red Russian Kale, to turn it over for some of our transplants. The kale is the basis of this brassica mix, great for cooking down. I helped the crew harvest the kale - getting each leaf off is no easy, or fast, feat. It definitely makes me appreciate the back-breaking work to get these greens. The mix also includes mizuna and sorrel.
MizunaMizuna is a Japanese mustard green with tender, pointy-lobed leaves and a pleasant, peppery flavor. You could substitute it, chopped, in a salad calling for arugula. It adds a nice zest to a stir-fry or saute too. Store mizuna, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Radicchio: This lettuce relative is actually a chicory, which has a bitter punch of flavor. Radicchio makes a great addition to salads for a pop of color and a contrast in flavor. You can also use the leaves as a base for hors d'oeuvres, or sauté them for a side dish. Pairs well with full-flavored cheeses, balsamic vinegar, and honey. Try chopping it finely and soaking in water to tame the bite!
Frozen Sweet Peppers: Throughout the summer and fall, we freeze a portion of our harvest so that we can provide you with a greater variety of vegetables throughout the winter. This week you will receive a package of our frozen sweet peppers. Keep them frozen into you are ready to use them. They will be delicious sautéed and thrown onto a pizza, or cooked into lasagna, casseroles, soups, or sauces. Look forward to more of the summer produce we have stowed away in our freezer, including corn, zucchini, beans, and broccoli!

Recipes

Caramelized Onion, Sweet Pepper, Greens, Feta Pizza
1 onion, sliced
several cloves of garlic
1 fresh sweet pepper or frozen sweet peppers
1 shallot if you have it, minced
Spinach or other green
1/2 container Marinated feta
oregano
crushed red pepper
Preheat the oven to 425F.
Stretch your pizza dough with well floured hands and place on baking sheet, let rest.
Heat a skillet, and add olive oil to coat. Add the onions and cover and simmer first on medium for around 5 minutes. Then add the peppers (frozen is fine) and cook on medium til the water evaporates from them. Then let onions and peppers simmer together a while to very soft and starting to color a bit. Add your shallots (if using) and garlic and saute a bit more til these soften but don't brown, and then remove to a plate.
In same skillet, toss in a bit more oil, some water, and the chopped kale and saute the kale til it softens. Steam will help achieve this and might take 5 mins. Then turn off.
Build pizza. Start with a smear of olive oil on the crust. Then spread the pepper mixture around. Then the crumble the feta between fingers and spread over crust. Then the kale. Then drizzle half the oil from the feta container and the yummy sundried tomato bits around. Next give your pizza a good sprinkling of oregano, crushed red pepper, and a bit of salt.
Bake until bottom is nicely baked and top comes together. Remove to a rack, slice and enjoy.
Potato, Roasted Pepper and Mizuna Salad
Adapted from Epicurious.com. You can roast and peel peppers following the directions below. Anchovies are a great source of omega-3s. If you are not so sure you are an anchovy lover, try this recipe. You may change your mind. Serves 4.
2 pounds potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
3.5 TB dry white wine
2 mixed colored sweet peppers
half of a 2-ounce can flat fillets of anchovies, drained, minced
4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 cup olive or sunflower oil
2-3 red torpedo onions, sliced (or 1 bunch of green onions)
1 bunch mizuna or arugula, sliced
Place potatoes in large pot. Cover with water. Boil until potatoes are just tender. Drain well. Transfer to large bowl. Mix in white wine. Char red or yellow peppers over gas flame or in broiler until blackened on all sides. Wrap in paper bag and let stand 10 minutes. Peel and seed. Rinse if necessary; pat dry. Alternatively, grill green or red peppers at a lower temperature to color and soften, without a lot of char. Cut peppers into 3/4-inch squares. Transfer to medium bowl.
Combine anchovies and vinegar in small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Pour 2/3 cup dressing over peppers. Add remaining dressing, green onions and mizuna to potatoes and mix gently. Season peppers and potatoes with salt and pepper. Let stand 30 minutes. Gently mix peppers into potatoes. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before serving.)
Classic Oven Roasted Onions
Bursting with rich brown flavors, roasted onions can be a one-dish meal, a first course, a salad or side dish. For a simple supper, try the warm onions with balsamic, maybe a drizzle of olive oil, and a crumbling of a favorite blue cheese, mild fresh goat cheese, or sp,e parm or whatever appeals.
4 medium to large organic onions (yellow, red, white)
Spread a sheet of foil on oven rack and preheat to 400 degrees. Trim away root and a 1/4 inch of top of onions. Set root side down on foil, spacing about 2 inches apart. Roast 1 hour, or until easily pierced with a knife. Serve warm or at room temperature. Make 2-inch deep cross out of top of each onion, spread slightly and season.
Seasoning Ideas:
*salt and freshly ground black pepper, 2 TB wine vinegar and 1 TB extra-virgin olive oil
*3 TB balsamic vinegar and possibly 2 to 3 oz of Gorgonzola, Maytag Blue, fresh goat cheese, Parmigiano-Reggiano, Fontinella, or cheese of choice, crumbled or grated
*chopped fresh herbs, rice and grain salads.
Asian Greens with Ginger Miso Dressing
This dressing of ginger, miso, tahini (sesame paste) and lemon adds a creamy balance to baby spinach, arugula, mizuna, and baby asian green blends. 
1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, coarsely chopped
2 TBS white miso (or brown if you don't have white)
3 TBS tahini (sesame paste)
1/2 cup water
3 TBS fresh lemon juice
Salad:
5 ounces greens
Several radishes or 1 small daikon, sliced into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
1 carrot, cut into 2-inch-long slender sticks
2 green onions (white part only), chopped (or sub in slices red torpedo onions, sliced thin)
For the dressing, place ginger, miso, tahini, water and lemon juice in a blender and blend until completely smooth. The consistency should be similar to cream. Strain the dressing through a fine sieve to remove ginger fiber if desired (I never do).
For the salad, divide greens among serving plates. Arrange radish and carrot on top, then sprinkle with scallions/onions.
Drizzle one to two tablespoons of dressing over each salad and serve. Delightful recipe.
Simple Mustard Greens Recipe
This is a wonderful way to enjoy your greens - feel free to use your spinach in this recipe if you didn't get mizuna.




Fermented Carrot Pickles
1½ lb. small carrots, peeled
 Zest of 2 limes, removed in 1” strips with a vegetable peeler
4 bay leaves
1.2 oz. kosher salt
Combine salt and 6 cups warm water in a large bowl, whisking to dissolve salt. Divide carrots, lime zest, and bay leaves between canning jars. Add brine to cover carrots. Cover with cheesecloth and secure with canning jar bands (without lids). Let sit out of direct sunlight in a room-temperature spot, skimming off any white mold that forms on surface of brine, 5 days. You may want to put the jars in a bowl or on a baking sheet just in case they bubble over.
After 5 days, taste carrots every day; once they are tangy and flavorful (this should take about 1 week in most cases), cover jars with lids and chill.
DO AHEAD: Pickles can be made 1 month ahead. Keep chilled.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com