Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - October 31, 2018

Remember... Thanksgiving week we deliver ONE DAY EARLY...

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Sorrel, Parsley, Tatsoi, Leeks, Romanesca Cauliflower, Orange Carrots, Red Norland Potatoes, Acorn Squash, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Arugula, Red Russian Kale, Pac Choi or Tatsoi, Romanesca Cauliflower, Garlic, Orange Carrots, Red Norland Potatoes, and Acorn Squash

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Mesclun, Sorrel, Tatsoi, Napa Cabbage, and Orange Carrots

Pantry/ Localvore Items

Running Stone Bread: Read more to the right!
Sweet Rowen Farmstead Farmers Cheese: This creamy cheese spread is made completely on farm from happy belted linebacks, a heritage breed, in West Glover, just a few miles down the road from us. It's lovely complement to the bread you're receiving! Unopened containers last several weeks; once opened they'll be good about 10 - 14 days.
Pete's Greens Chimichurri: This very flavorful Argentinian condiment is made with fresh parsley. cilantro, and jalapenos from our farm, plus cider vinegar, garlic, olive oil, and salt. It is usually served alongside meats, but it can also liven up a sandwich or eggs or go along with potatoes. For a simple sandwich try a slather of chimi and good cheese between a couple slices of good bread. It's coming to you frozen. You can use it right away or freeze for a few months before thawing out to enjoy.
Pete's Zesty Dill Freezer Pickles: We love these zesty little coins of goodness! These pickles are sweet and sour and are great eaten right out of the container or added to a sandwich. They are a freezer pickle and we are sending them out frozen so you may need to thaw a bit more in order to enjoy, or you can put right back in the freezer for a later date (use within 6 months). Once open keep refrigerated and eat within 3 weeks.

CHEESE SHARE

Barn First Creamery describes themselves as a "farmstead goat microdairy". Located in Westfield, VT, these two humans make a variety of goat cheese from their herd of 23 does. I first heard about this cheese from Martin at our Waterbury Farm Market - it's his favorite cheese! I recommend following Barn First's Facebook page as you'll see some ridiculously cute goat pictures that will make your day.

BREAD SHARE

It's been several years since we've had bread from Adam Wilson, who has since ventured out on his own with Running Stone Bread. It's taken us about a year and a half to get this bread order together! I hope you enjoy this dense, healthy, small-batch bread, with truly locally sourced ingredients. From Adam: "The 'runner stone' is the top stone in a the stone mill, the one that turns to grind the grain. In my mill, the runner stone is a 26" diameter disc of Barre granite. I trained to bake in Germany in 2007, and bake in the style I learned there -- freshly milled whole grain flours, natural leaven, wood-fired oven, focus on rye as much as wheat -- resulting in nutritious, hearty and long-keeping breads. I use wheat from Seth Johnson at Morningstar Farm [our bean supplier] and Todd Hardie at Thornhill Farm, both in the Northeast Kingdom, and corn from Nitty Gritty Grains in Charlotte."  
 

Around the Farm

Carrots have been the theme around here lately! Our crew is spending somewhere around 11 full days harvesting carrots - orange carrots, rainbow carrots, big carrots, baby carrots. So many carrots! This year lots of our storage carrots were grown right outside our barn / office/ wash house, so it's been a near "easy" transition to get them from the ground to the coolers where they'll be stored for the season. We love our carrots around here, as they sustain our bellies and business through this cold season.
I've included some pictures of the carrot harvest this season. We're running two harvesters simultaneously! The carrot harvester brings the carrots up from the ground and into giant bins on a flatbed. Then they get unloaded at the wash house and taken into the coolers by Alison, our farm badass forklift operator! She stacks our veggies into our climate, humidity, and light controlled coolers. The walls of veggie bins stacked floor to ceiling amazes me every winter (this is my third winter here) and serves as a reminder that we CAN eat locally all year long!
~ Taylar
Top left: Pete drives the tractor while Paul drives the bins. Top right: Pete staying warm.
Middle left: Paul making room. Middle right: Isaac explaining to me how the other tractor works (those two big steel posts are what loosen up the carrots from the dirt, while a little blade chops off the green tops).
Bottom left: Alison stacking bins. Third row right: Alexis getting bins from the flatbed to the loading dock. Bottom right: Stacks of veggies in the cooler... future CSA shares!
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: All the greens are pre-washed but we recommend giving them a good rinse before eating. Unopened, the bags will store for several days in the fridge. They need to stay cool as much as possible. We're getting down to the last of our field greens! This mesclun is a mix of lettuce, kales, mustard, mizuna, and two varieties of baby arugula.
Acorn Squash: This is a classic old favorite green winter squash with distinctive longitudinal ridges and sweet, yellow-orange flesh. It's a good source of dietary fiber and potassium, as well as smaller amounts of vitamins C and B, magnesium, and manganese. It's excellent baked or roasted, steamed or stuffed with rice, meat, or vegetable mixtures. Try roasting veggies baking them into the squash. Just slice off the top and scoop out the insides. Fill the squash with your fixings and bake in the oven around 350 degrees.
Brussels sprouts: Stalks again this week! My favorite way to eat them is halved, sauteed in olive oil with garlic, and then broiled until crispy. This is Mark Bittman's style, and he dresses them in a little balsamic vinegar at the end. You could also go the Positive Pie route and deep fry them, then dip in a yummy garlic aioli! Brussels sprouts should be stored in a closed plastic bag in the crisper drawer.
Pac choi or Tatsoi: Both Asian greens, with the tatsoi being longer and darker (and has a spoon like shape, a pleasant and sweet aroma flavor like a mild mustard flavor). Both are mild enough to be eaten raw or sauteed, but may be added to soups or stir fries at the end of the cooking period. Store either in a plastic bag or container in your crisper drawer and use within several days.
Arugula: is also known as Rocket or Roquette. It's a very popular and versatile green that can be eaten raw, but also stands up well in the sauté pan. It has a peppery mustardy flavor and is great on sandwiches to give them pep, and into salads to take it up a notch. It also does well with a quick wilt added to pastas, frittatas or calzones, or as a stand-in for lettuce on an Italian-inspired sub. It blends particularly well with goat cheese and balsamic and olive oil. It is delicious simply sautéed in a pan with olive oil with a sprinkle of coarse salt & pepper.
Parsley: Much more than a garnish, parsley has lots to offer. Chopped parsley can be sprinkled on a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetable sautés and grilled fish. Combine chopped parsley, garlic and lemon zest, and use it as a rub for chicken, lamb and beef. Add it to soups and tomato sauces. It is a key flavor ingredient in the mediterranean dish tabouli and in the Argentinian chimichurri sauce (recipe below). Parsley is one of those vegetables with huge nutritional benefits, even when using just a couple tablespoons of the minced green. The vitamin content is very high (particularly vitas A, C, K, and folic acid). And what's more, the activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a "chemoprotective" food, a food that can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens.
Leeks were once called the poor person's asparagus, but today are cherished for their culinary qualities right along side asparagus. Leeks tend to collect dirt in between the tops of their long leaves therefore it is important to wash between leaf folds to remove dirt or soak in a water bath and let dirt sink to bottom. Store wrapped in plastic in the fridge. Although the best quality is within the first few days, they can be stored for an extended amount of time in the fridge. Peel outer leaves if damaged and use tender inner stalks. Use them as if they were onions.

Recipes

Cheese Brussels Sprouts Pasta Bake
Waterbury CSA member Amy sent in this recipe she made last week with her Brussels. It'sadapted from a recipe by Deb Perelman (Smitten Kitchen). Deb's recipe calls for 12 oz Brussels sprouts. Here are Amy's notes:
It’s a cheesy baked pasta with shredded Brussel sprouts, lemon zest, and other yumminess. We LOVED it tonight. I bet it would be great with kale or cauliflower (or a mix of the two) as well! Could add bacon, sausage or chicken if not looking for a veg meal. We just served with a lightly dressed green salad…was perfect. :)
225g short pasta (we used scoobi doo, but macaroni, farfale or another small shape will do.)
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2lb brussels sprouts (thinly sliced - about 8 cups)
2 cloves garlic (minced)
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 3/4 cup vegetable stock
the zest of 1 lemon
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 1/4 cup grated gruyere cheese (about 115 g)
1 1/4 cup grated mozzarella cheese (about 115g)
Preheat oven to 400F. Cook pasta per package directions in a large pot of salted boiling water.
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat butter and olive oil over medium heat. Add Brussels sprouts and garlic and sauté until the sprouts begin to wilt and soften, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle flour over sprouts and stir until no remaining flour is visible. Add stock, lemon zest and juice, salt and pepper and simmer until sauce is slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add 1/2 the cheese and stir to combine.
Transfer pasta to a greased 2 quart baking dish (8" x 11" pyrex dish works well) and sprinkle remaining cheese over top. Bake for 15-20 minutes until cheese is bubbly and brown, setting the oven to broil for the last minute or two.
Roquette and Walnut Pesto Fettuccine
"Roquette" (aka arugula) makes a wonderful peppery pesto to dress up your fresh pasta. Add another dimension by sauteing your favorite vegetables to top this dish.
2 cups roquette
1/3 cup walnuts
1/4 cup basil
2 tbsp pine nuts
2 tsp parmesan, grated
2 large garlic cloves, chopped
1/2 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper
1lb fresh fettuccine, cooked according to package (about 3 minutes)
Chop the roquette, walnuts, basil, pine nuts, parmesan and garlic in a food processor. With the motor running, pour in the oil in a thin stream until the mixture is smooth and incorporated. Season with salt and pepper, then toss with the hot pasta.
Sorrel & Potato Soup
The recipe below is adapted from a classic French sorrel soup recipe. It is also good cold, particularly with some plain yogurt swirled in. Serves 3 or 4.
1 bunch fresh sorrel
4 cups water
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2/3 pound potatoes, cubed
1 large egg
1/4 cup crème fraiche or heavy cream (or more to taste)
Wash the sorrel and de-rib the leaves if necessary. Put it in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, until the sorrel has melted into a purée and nearly all of its liquid has evaporated. Add the water and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil. Add the potatoes and cook over low heat until the potatoes are cooked through — about fifteen minutes. If you prefer a creamy rather than a chunky soup, put the soup into a blender or food processor and then return to the saucepan. Combine the eggs and crème fraiche in a warmed serving bowl. Mix until well blended. Add a ladle of the potato and sorrel mixture and blend well. Pour in remaining potato and sorrel mixture and serve immediately.
Napa Cabbage, Kohlrabi, Carrot Slaw 
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2.5 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
1.5 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
1.5 tablespoons (packed) brown sugar
1 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger 
1 Napa Cabbage chopped
2 kohlrabi peeled and cut into matchstick size strips (optional, but I prefer it)
1 large red or yellow bell peppers, cut into matchstick-size strips
2 medium carrots, peeled, cut into matchstick-size strips
4 scallions, cut into matchstick-size strips
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro   
If you have a food processor you can use it to grate the carrots, kohlrabi and cabbage and peppers. Otherwise hand chop and mix together in a large bowl. Add dressing and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
Chilled Sesame-Ginger Tatsoi
From the New York Times November 1995. You can use both the pac choi and the tastoi in this recipe. The cooking time for the pac choi will be a bit longer, and pac choi stems a bit longer still (still no more than 2 mins).
1.5 lb Tatsoi; washed and dried
Salt to taste
1/3 tamari
2 TB sesame oil
1 TB ginger
1 TB sugar
½ c white vinegar
4 dashes Tabasco
Black Pepper to taste
¼ c sesame seeds
Bring a large pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Add the tatsoi, blanch for I minute, drain, immediately plunge into ice water to stop the cooking process, and drain again.
In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger, sugar, vinegar and Tabasco. Mix well, and season to taste with salt and pepper.
In a large bowl, combine the tatsoi and dressing, and mix well Refrigerate until well chilled, gar nish with sesame seeds and serve.

Chili-Roasted Acorn Squash
2 acorn squash (1 1/2 pounds each), halved lengthwise, seeds removed
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons chili powder
Coarse salt and ground pepper
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Cut each squash half into several wedges, then halve wedges crosswise.
On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss squash with oil and chili powder; season with salt and pepper, and toss again. Roast until tender and starting to brown, 20 to 25 minutes, tossing halfway through.
Steam squash, sprinkled with salt, in a large pot over medium heat, until soft. Puree with coconut milk, curry powder, salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings.
While squash is steaming, heat oil in a large heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat. Add leeks and garlic and saute, stirring frequently, until leeks are translucent, about 5 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high and add mustard greens, salt and pepper. Saute, stirring frequently, until mustard greens turn deep green, about 5 minutes, decreasing heat if necessary. Taste for seasoning. Ladle hot squash soup into bowls and garnish with the sauteed greens.

Sauteed Tatsoi
Here's a quick, tasty way to enjoy your tatsoi.
1 head tatsoi
Garlic
Salt
Olive oil
Slice the stems into 3/4-inch lengths and stir-fry them with some finely chopped garlic and a generous pinch of salt in olive oil for a minute or two, then add a couple tablespoons of water and steam them, covered, for a couple of minutes to soften them further. At that point add the whole leaves, stirring and turning them with tongs for about a minute, then add about ¼ cup water and another generous pinch of salt and steam, covered, until wilted and tender, about 3 to 4 minutes more.
You could give it an Asian flavor with ginger, soy sauce, and a touch of toasted sesame oil, but it’s just as delicious in a simple Italian-style treatment with garlic and olive oil.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.

Delivery Reminders!

This season is 17 deliveries over 18 weeks. Each year, we all take off 1 week in December to recharge. There will be NO DELIVERY the week of December 24.
The week of Thanksgiving, November 22, we will deliver ALL SHARES one day early. Wednesday sites will receive shares on TUESDAY and Thursday sites will receive shares on WEDNESDAY.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - October 24, 2018

Welcome to the Fall/ Winter CSA!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Greens, Lettuce, Cilantro, Garlic, Hot Pepper, Poblano Peppers, Green Wave Mustard, White Cauliflower, Yellow Onions, Delicata Squash, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts
2 bags of Tomatoes

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Chard, White Cauliflower, Gold Beets, Delicata Squash, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Mesclun, Lettuce, Collard Greens, Romanesca Cauliflower, Delicata Squash, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

Pantry/ Localvore Items

VT Tortilla Co TortillasSmall-scale, handmade tortillas from a woman- run business in Shelburne! They have no preservatives so if you cannot eat them within 7-10 days, please freeze until you're ready to use!
Cellars at Jasper Hill Shred: From our neighbors in Greensboro, this Chef Shred is comprised of mostly their cheddar and Alpha Tolman cheeses. In addition to using this in burritos or quesadillas, on pizza, etc, try fondue! 
Pete's Greens Tomatillo Salsa: From our farm kitchen. A great addition to any Mexican-inspired dish, or eggs, burger meat mixtures, filling (mixed with cheese) for jalapeño poppers, and sandwiches. 
Eggs: Most members are getting a dozen eggs from Besteyfield Farm in Hinesburg (others will get Axel's eggs). You may have noticed the line on the sticker of your egg carton: "pasture raised eggs from rather contented hens". Says Ben Butterfield, the owner and farmer (and father of a fun young 'un, right) at Besteyfield:
Part of why I got into this was, I developed some strong opinions on how I’d like to see animals raised. You need to make sure they have space for their natural behaviors like flying, pecking in the grass and taking dust baths. It’s hard to objectively assess the happiness of hens but here they have stuff to do and space to do it.

CHEESE SHARE

Made from their own high quality Holstein raw cow's milk, Landaff Creamery's Landaff Cheese is a mild, semi-firm cheese with a delicious combination of flavors. Its complexity balances a bright buttermilk tang and savory brown butter notes. The buttery texture comes with a natural, safe-to-eat rind cave aged at the Cellars at Jasper Hill. It melts beautifully for cooking, and makes a wonderful addition to any cheese plate. Remove cheese from the refrigerator about an hour before you plan to eat it. This will allow the full flavors to be enjoyed. Keep your cheese surfaces protected so they won't dry out. If mold does develop, just trim it off.
Doug and Deb Erb craft Landaff on their second-generation dairy farm in the White Mountains. Declining milk prices drove the Erbs’ determined pursuit of cheesemaking as a way to revitalize their farm. Doug developed Landaff after study with the Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheese and time spent making Caerphilly with the Duckett family of Somerset, England.

What's in Season

We grow what goes into your shares! Here's a list of what's in season right now, and harvested, that you can expect to see in your shares over the next few weeks/ months:
Chard, Collard Greens, Lettuce, Kale, Pac Choi/ Tatsoi, Parsley, Salad Turnips
Cauliflower - White and Romanesca
Garlic, Onions
Potatoes, Beets, Turnips, Daikon Radish, "Red Meat" Radish, Rutabaga, Carrots, Kohlrabi
Winter Squash
Brussels sprouts, Cabbage
Fennel, Radicchio

Around the Farm

On Sunday, I attended a regional food waste summit in Greensboro. The summit showed parts of Anthony Bourdain's film Wasted: The Story of Food Waste and included presentations from organizations like Salvation Farms and VT99. Pete's Greens partners with both those organizations. Every week, we donate "extras" and seconds produce to Salvation Farms, a Lamoille Valley gleaning organization, for distribution to senior meal programs and food shelves (they also "glean" from our fields). We also send them bins of culled carrots for their Vermont Commodity Program in Winooski.
Along with Jasper Hill Farm, we collaborate on VT99, a pork project where pigs are raised on our farm and fed whey from the cheesemaking process and veggies from our farm. It makes for some healthy pigs and is a great outlet for byproducts from both our food businesses!
I learned a shocking stat: it takes 25 years for a head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill! We're fortunate here in VT to have a comprehensive organics diversion law (no organic products like food scraps or leaves can go into the landfill) plus a network of organizations willing to work to address hunger in our communities. At least 1 in 5 Vermonters is food insecure, meaning they don't have enough to eat. Getting our food into the charitable food system is one way we're keeping organic products out of the landfill and helping feed our neighbors who can't afford fresh veggies.
For more info on composting, contact your local solid waste management district. I highly recommend checking out the film, too! Engaging and informative.
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: All the greens are pre-washed but we recommend giving them a good rinse before eating. Unopened, the bags will store for several days in the fridge. They need to stay cool as much as possible.
Delicata Squash: A favorite! We've wiped these down for you but the skin is edible, so please give a more thorough scrub if you plan to eat the thin, tasty skin.
Brussels sprouts: Related to cabbage, kale, collards, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and broccoli, Brussels sprouts get their name from being grown in and around Brussels, Belgium. Brussels sprouts are a tall-stemmed cabbage in which many tiny heads form at the bases of the leaves along the entire length of the central stalk. The "sprouts" are made up of tightly packed leaves, each resembling a miniature cabbage head. Like most brassicas, the flavor of Brussels sprouts benefit from a frost, concentrating their sugars.
Brussels sprouts can get a bad rap from those who have eaten overcooked versions that their parents may have boiled to oblivion. Try sauteing, or better yet, roasting them to bring out their inherent sweetness. Brussels sprouts should be stored in a closed plastic bag in the crisper drawer.
Please note: we've been battling aphids in our Brussels sprouts for two seasons. Members from last year may recall NO Brussels at all! We're sending these out to you, at a lower value than usual, knowing you may come across some aphids inside the sprouts. The aphids left no discernible pattern to attacking stalks or sprouts but rather than lose them all, we're sending out what we think are the most problem-free. Please let me know how your stalks turn out! **Some members will need to pick up TWO stalks. More info Wednesday!**
Green Wave MustardRelated to kale, cabbage, and collard greens, mustard greens are the peppery leafy greens of the mustard plant. Green Wave is a beautiful representative of this group. Green Wave is a bit hot when raw, but still tender enough for salads. It is delightful in stir-frys, braises, steamed and added to many dished calling for greens.
Peppers: The last of our hot peppers and poblano peppers! You may find some hot orange habaneros, or green or red jalapeños. The poblanos are nice roasted or stuffed.
Collard Greens are a form of kale and cabbage, with a sturdier and thicker leaf than kale or cabbage. They are probably best known in America as being part of the American South cuisine, but similar varieties are also popular in the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. There are a few ways of cooking them, most commonly boiled until tender with some pork product. You can cook them slow and long or simmered in broth for 15 - 30 minutes until the texture is medium firm, like sautéed cabbage. Thinly sliced leaves can be cooked briefly, for a greener flavor and chewier texture. You can also mix them with other leaves (try your kale!) for a more complex taste. You can also blanch the leaves and use them as a wrapper (like grape leaves) or use them as a stuffing. The stalks are tough; discard and only use the leaves. Keep collards very cold. Wrap in a ventilated plastic and use fairly soon - they don't last as long as a cabbage.
Tomatoes: Purple bags, please pick up TWO paper bags of tomatoes! We have two types going out this week, paste (or Roma) tomatoes, which are long and oval, or red/ yellow/ heirloom slicers. Our crew was cleaning out beds late last week and found these field tomatoes still hanging on! I hope you enjoy.

Recipes

Roasted Brussel Sprouts
from the Barefoot Contessa Cookbook
1.5 lbs brussel sprouts
3 TB good olive oil
3/4 tsp kosher salt
.5 tsp freshly ground black pepper
Preheat oven to 400°F.
Cut off the brown ends of the Brussels sprouts and pull off any yellow outer leaves. Mix them in a bowl with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Pour them on a sheet pan and roast for 35 to 40 minutes, until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside. Shake the pan from time to time to brown the sprouts evenly. Sprinkle with more kosher salt ( I like these salty like French fries), and serve immediately.
Brussels Sprout Slaw with Mustard Dressing and Maple-Glazed Pecans
Bon Appétit November 2009. Serves 8.
Vegetable oil
1 cup large pecan halves
1/4 cup pure maple syrup (grade B is best)
1/2 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt plus additional for seasoning
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup whole grain Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed
Preheat oven to 325°F.
Make the Candied Pecans:
Oil a large sheet of foil. Place pecans on small rimmed baking sheet. Whisk maple syrup, 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in small bowl. Add to nuts and toss to coat; spread in single layer. Bake nuts 5 minutes. Stir. Continue to bake nuts until toasted and glaze is bubbling thickly, about 6 minutes. Immediately transfer nuts to prepared foil and separate. Cool completely.
Make the Dressing:
Whisk mustard, vinegar, lemon juice, and sugar in small bowl; whisk in oil. Season with coarse salt and pepper.
Cook the Brussels:
Bring large pot of water to boil. Add 1 tablespoon coarse salt. Add brussels sprouts. Cook until crisp-tender and still bright green, about 5 minutes. Drain; rinse with cold water. Cool on paper towels. Using processor fitted with 1/8- to 1/4-inch slicing disk, slice brussels sprouts. Transfer to large bowl.
Toss brussels sprouts with enough dressing to coat. Let marinate 30 to 60 minutes. Mix in some pecans. Place slaw in serving bowl. Top with remaining pecans.
Wilted Asian Greens
Adapted from a recipe in the July 2003 issue of Gourmet magazine. You could also substitute Pak Choi in this recipe and it would be great, but you will need to steam the chopped stems a couple minutes and then the leaves til tender. The spinach (if using) and mustards do not need to be cooked before adding the hot dressing.
1/4 cup rice vinegar
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
8 cups chopped Spinach, tough stems removed (3 oz)
8 cups mustard (3 oz)
Heat vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, ginger, and sesame oil in a small saucepan over moderately low heat, stirring, until sugar is dissolved (do not let boil). Pour hot dressing over greens in a large bowl and toss well. Serve immediately.
Cilantro-Lime Vinaigrette
From Eating Well Magazine. Orange juice and cilantro yield a tangy dressing that you'll want to have on hand. Makes 1 1/2 cups.
1 cup packed cilantro
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup lime juice
1/4 cup orange juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Pinch of minced garlic
Puree cilantro, olive oil, lime juice, orange juice, salt, pepper and garlic in a blender or food processor until smooth. Makes 1 1/4 cups.
Roasted Cauliflower
Cut the cauliflower head into slices. Toss them with a little ghee and salt and then arrange them in a single layer on a prepared baking sheet (line with parchment paper if you'd like). Roast for 20-30 minutes at 400 degrees, until the slices are browning on the edges.
Serve alongside something like lentils or quinoa. A delicious, simple way to eat cauliflower.
Grown-up Grilled Cheese
This recipe is adapted from the Vermont Farm Table Cookbook by Tracey Medeiros. Switch up your panini ingredients with whatever you have on hand- pesto, spreads, cheeses, or fresh veggies. Dare I say add a hot pepper to kick it up a notch further?
1 1/2 tsp unsalted butter, softened
2 slices Flax Bread
3 thin slices sweet onion
Lettuce
1-2 thin slices prosciutto
Freshly ground black pepper
1 slice (3 ounces) Landaff cheese or any other mild raw cow's milk cheese
Coarse grain or Dijon mustard
Preheat a grill pan over medium-high heat or preheat a panini press. Spread one side of each slice of bread with butter and place buttered side down on a cutting board. Layer one side of the bread with the onion, lettuce, and prosciutto. Season with pepper to taste. Top with the cheese and the second slice of bread.
Place the sandwich on the grill pan or panini press. If using a pan, weigh down with a heavy skillet and cook until golden brown and the cheese has melted, 3 to 4 minutes per side. If using a panini press, grill according to the directions. Cut the sandwich in half and serve with mustard on the side.
Cheese Fondue with Vegetables
Fondue is a fun hands-on meal that can take on so many variations. Try making veggie fries, as suggested here, or use cubed bread or meats. The perfect apres-ski meal!
1 garlic clove, halved crosswise
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
1 tablespoon cornstarch (or arrowroot powder)
3 cups shredded cheese (Jasper Hill’s Chef Shred, or cheddar, gruyere, emmental, etc).
For dipping:
Carrots, potatoes, kohlrabi, cauliflower, etc., cut into cubes, wedges, or wide matchsticks
Olive Oil
Salt and pepper
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Toss vegetables with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake, turning occasionally, for 40 minutes or until vegetables are cooked through and golden.
Rub inside of a 4-quart heavy pot with cut sides of garlic, then discard garlic. Add wine to pot and bring just to a simmer over moderate heat.
Stir together cornstarch and win in a cup or bowl.
Gradually add cheese to pot and cook, stirring constantly in a zigzag pattern (not a circular motion) to prevent cheese from balling up, until cheese is just melted and creamy (do not let boil). Stir cornstarch mixture again and stir into fondue. Bring fondue to a simmer and cook, stirring, until thickened, 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer to fondue pot set over a flame.
Serve veggies or other dipping foods on a platter with fondue skewers, toothpicks, or kabob skewers for dipping.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.

Delivery Reminders!

This season is 17 deliveries over 18 weeks. Each year, we all take off 1 week in December to recharge. There will be NO DELIVERY the week of December 24.
The week of Thanksgiving, November 22, we will deliver ALL SHARES one day early. Wednesday sites will receive shares on TUESDAY and Thursday sites will receive shares on WEDNESDAY.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com