Thursday, February 19, 2015

Good Eats Newsletter - February 18, 2015

 

Welcome to the Spring Good Eats CSA!

 

The first pick-up is TOMORROW  Wednesday, Februrary 18th,

or Thursday, February 19th, for Thursday pick-up sites.

 

Email us at goodeats@petesgreens.com if you have any questions!

 

Localvore Members 

& Veggie Only Share Members

take a TAN / LIGHT GREEN BAG

 

This week your bag will contain:

Shoots; Potatoes; Beets; Turnips; Onions; Cabbage

 

And OUT of the bag:

Frozen Spinach

Frozen Zucchini

 

 

Localvore Offerings Include:

Red Hen Apple Oat Bread

Pete's Kitchen Basil Pesto

 Jasper Hill Alpha Tolman Cheese

 

 

 

Half Veggie Only Members

take a YELLOW BAG

containing:

Shoots; Potatoes; Beets; Turnips; Onions; Cabbage

 

And OUT of the bag:

Frozen Spinach

Spring Shares Still Available
 
We are still accepting members for our Spring share.  Please spread the word about Good Eats to your friends and family!

 

 


If you would be willing
to post something to your front porch forum
or other neighborhood email group to spread the word, please email me!

 


 

Meat Share members

 

The 1st Meat Share Delivery isn't until March 4th or 5th

depending on your share site.

 

 

Share Pick-Up Instructions! Please review.

 

Whether you are a seasoned CSA share member or new to Good Eats, it's important to review the pick-up instructions before you head out to pick up your share!


Clipboard #1,

Find your name on the Names List - Find your name on the pick-up list and check it off.  The first clipboard contains a list of all share members at your site. Note that only one name is listed for each share. If you can't find your name on the list, look for your share partner's name (only one of you is listed). Checking off your name lets us know who has picked up and is extremely helpful in solving any mysteries at the end of the day. If you can't find your name or your share partner's name, please don't take a share! Call or email us and we'll figure it out.

Check your share type on the Names  List. Share types are Lo
calvore, Localvore Vegetarian, Half Veggie with Pantry, Half Veggie with Pantry Vegetarian, Veggie Only, Half Veggie Only, Pete's Pantry, Pete's Pantry Vegetarian, or Meat Share. If you are listed incorrectly or have questions, let us know.

Clipboard #2,

Pick-Up Instructions - Select your items by following the Pick-Up Instructions. These are posted on the second clipboard. Follow the specific item list/instructions to assemble your share. The top section of the pick up list describes what to select for the vegetable portion of the  share. The bottom section of the Pick-Up Instructions lists the localvore (non-vegetable) items that Localvore and Pete's Pantry members should select.

If you are sharing a share with someone - coordinate with your share-mate to make sure that you DON'T take double the amount of any items. All shares are packed and delivered to the sites are whole shares.


Please note that the first Meat Share pick up is not this week,

it is the first Wednesday (or Thursday for some sites) of every month

starting March 4th and 5th.

 

Which color bag do I take?

If you are a Localvore or Veggie Only member take a tan / light green bag shown in the picture below at left.

 

If you are a Half share member (with or without pantry) take a bright yellow bag shown below at the right.

 


 

 

 

What To Do If You Have a Problem at Pick Up


Although we do our best to make sure that every delivery and pick-up goes smoothly, there are the occasional shortages and disappointments. Should you arrive at your pick-up site to find that your name (or share partner's name) is not on the list, one or more of your items are missing or that some of your produce is in unsatisfactory condition, please let us know right away!

 

Our goal is 100% satisfaction. If you email us (or call if you can not email) as soon as you discover the problem, we may be able to resolve it the same day or the following day. If you would like to receive an item that you missed at pick-up, you must contact us by Friday morning.

If we have not heard from anyone, by Thursday afternoon (for Wedensday deliveries) or Friday afternoon (for Thursday deliveries) our site hosts are instructed to donate leftover food, ensuring that they do not end up with bad food on their hands.

If we can not resolve your issue right away, email us to arrange a replacement or substitution.  These will generally come in the next week's delivery.

 

 

Picking Up Your Share
Please review your confirmation email or visit our Delivery Site page for pick up times and locations of pick up sites. If you have any questions about your pick-up please email us. The quickest way to reach me is really by email, but you may leave a message on voice mail at 802.586.2882 x 2

 

 

Changes to Your Delivery?

If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let us know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or you can skip your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.

 

 

 

Our Weekly Good Eats Newsletter

 

Hello Everyone,

 

Welcome to the Good Eats Spring Share.  Thanks for joining us! 

 

This is your first addition of the weekly Good Eats Newsletter.  Each Tuesday evening this is sent out to let you know what to expect in this week's share. We also include storage and use tips, localvore information, recipes and anything else we think you might find interesting or useful. Pete and/or other crew members on the farm will often chime in with farm updates, thoughts and pleas for feedback.

The picking for the weekly share begins on Monday and the packing of shares is finished late Tuesday afternoon in order to give you extremely  fresh produce. Although we try to get the newsletter out just as early as we can, we do like to wait until the share is packed up and finalized. Sometimes there are last minute changes to the contents and we want to make sure that you have the right information to accompany your pick-up.
 If there are changes to the share that occur after the newsletter has been sent (which happens occasionally), you may receive a follow-up email Tuesday night or Wednesday.

If you have any feedback on the newsletter, recipe contributions or just general questions about the CSA, feel free to email us. 
We also post each newsletter on our blog and on our website. It generally gets posted to the web sometime on Wednesday or Thursday. You can also search our archive of recipes, farm stories and share contents at these sites.

Please add GoodEats@petesgreens.com to your address book to limit the possibility of having newsletters filtered as spam.

 

Feel free to contact us anytime with questions or comments about Good Eats.  We look forward to sending you food each week! ~ Sara

 

 

 

Storage and Use Tips

 

Each week we'll give you storage tips so you can learn about the veggies in the share that you may not be familiar with.  Most of these tips are on our website too, so please get acquainted with and bookmark the recipe and storage tip section of our website. I am sure you will find it useful!

 

Our shoots are a mix of radish and sunflower shoots. They're a great winter alternative when fresh lettuce and other greens just aren't as easy to come by. They can be used in place of greens in a salad and are awesome on sandwiches and in wraps. I particularly like them with hummus, as well as egg salad. Rinse and drain just before use. Keep in the crisper drawer of your fridge.

 

Red gold potatoes are going out for everyone this week.  They're low in starch, high in sugar and moisture.  They're a great choice for roasting, sautéing and boiling, as their low starch content helps them maintain their shape after they’re cooked. This time of year it's best to store your potatoes in a dark, cool place.

 

Red beets have so many health benefits. They contain betaine, the same substance that is used in certain treatments of depression. They also contain trytophan, which relaxes the mind and creates a sense of well-being, similar to chocolate. Beets can also lower your blood pressure. They also contain potassium, magnesium, fiber, phosphorus, iron; vitamins A, B & C; beta-carotene, beta-cyanine; and folic acid. Beets are particularly beneficial to women who are pregnant, as the vitamin B and iron are very beneficial to new growth cells during pregnancy and replenishing iron in the woman’s body. Beets cleanse the body- they're a wonderful tonic for the liver, works as a purifier for the blood, and can prevent various forms of cancer. Try shredding your beets and adding to your salads, juice them, boil or roast them. Store your beets in the fruit and vegetable drawer of your refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.


Gilfeather turnips have a distinctive flavor. They were first developed in Vermont by John Gilfeather, a farmer who kept his prized variety carefully guarded. He would actually chop the top and root off each of his turnips before sale, so no one could regrow the plant. Thankfully a few seeds snuck out, and many farmers are now able to keep this special type going. It looks more like a rutabaga than a turnip, but the flesh is white and makes a beautiful sweet-flavored puree.

 

The yellow onions this week are coming to you from Harvest Hill Farm. This certififed organic farm is located in Walden, VT. You may wonder why we're sending out onions from another farm - unfortunately much of our onion crop was ruined last fall during the drying process. It was extremely rainy at that time, interfering with the curing process and making extended storage impossible. We're lucky to be able to partner with another local, organic farm to bring you onions. Onions are best stored in a cool dark place.

 

Round with crinkled leaves, savoy cabbage are the beauties of the cabbage world. Their leaves are more delicate and more loosely packed than their green cabbage cousins. These cabbages are great in soups and stir fries, and the leaves are are perfect for stuffing with rice.  Red Savoys may be used just like green savoys.  Only the outer leaves are red, the inner leaves are green.  Store as you would other cabbages, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer. Don't worry if the outer leaves begin to discolor or tear on you, just remove them to expose the perfectly good leaves remaining below.


Frozen spinach is great for casseroles, lasagnas, quiches etc. Thaw it, squeeze out the excess liquid and add it in.  Or let it thaw on counter til it softens up enough to saw with a knife, and saw off section to use a lesser amount in a dish.  You can put the remainder back in freezer.  This is really great in pasta or even added to smoothies.

 

Frozen zucchini is also going out for the large share  When you thaw the zucchini, it will lose a lot of water. This is perfect for baking actually and for many other recipes as well. Let it thaw, and then squeeze out all the excess water and then add the zucchini to your recipe.

 

Veggie Storage and Use Tips are on our website too, so please bookmark the recipe and storage tip section.  I am sure you will find it useful.

 

 

Localvore Lore

 

Red Hen is baking something new for us this week - Apple Oat Bread. Red Hen is one of our great local artisan bakers. They are focused on using locally grown ingredients as much as possible.  They recently entered into a partnership with a Canadian farm, Le Moulin des Cedres, to get all the certified organic flour for their breads within a 150 mile radius. Read more about the partnership here. This bread also features locally grown oats from the Rogers Farmstead.

Pete's Kitchen sweet basil pesto - we grew a lot of basil last summer and stockpiled pesto for Good Eats. This pesto contains our own basil blended with olive oil, romano and parmesan cheese, sunflower seeds, garlic, lemon juice and salt. It is tasty slathered on bread or added to pasta with grated cheese on top. If you like yours garlicky - add some minced fresh garlic to your cooked pasta before mixing the pesto with the pasta.  The pesto will come to you frozen. To use, simply thaw and eat as is or add to your dishes. It will keep in your fridge a couple weeks, but if you won't use the entire tub right away, just throw it back in the freezer! It keeps really well.

Alpha Tolman Cheese is a Jasper Hill Creamery original.  Inspired by the classic Alpine cheeses of Europe with a modified recipe designed to showcase the cows and landscape of the Northeast Kingdom, Vermont.


Alpha is made using the traditional Alpine methods of cooking and pressing the curds during cheesemaking to achieve a tight, elastic texture and robust, complex flavors. Fresh wheels are washed with a cultured brine to cultivate a rosy orange rind that imparts a funky depth to the ripening paste beneath. Young wheels have milky, fruit and nut flavors and a smooth mouthfeel. Mature wheels are more bold and meaty with amplified butter and caramelized onion flavors carried by a rich and crystalline texture.  The texture, aesthetic, and flavor make Alpha Tolman a great choice for fondue. Try pairing slices with a robust Ale, plummy red wine, or onion jam.

If that isn't enough description to get you psyched up for Alpha Tolman, here's one more nugget.  This cheese took home SUPER GOLD in the 2012 World Cheese Awards, one of only 9 American cheeses to receive that recognition.  Over 2700 cheeses from 30 different countries competed.

 

 

Recipes

 

We also provide you with recipes to help you fully enjoy your weekly bounty.  Got a great recipe you want to share?  Email me - I would love to share with our members!

 

 


Bandh Gobhi Ki Sabzi (Buttered Smothered Cabbage)
Here's a traditional cabbage dish that will be great using the Savoy cabbage.

1 savoy cabbage (1-3/4 to 2 lbs)
2 Tbl ghee, butter or oil
1-1/2 tsp cumin seeds
1/4 tsp ground asafoetida (optional)*
1/4 tsp turmeric
1 Tbl minced ginger root or 1/2 tsp dry
1 8 oz can tomato sauce or 1 cup chopped fresh ripe tomato (1 large)
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper or 1-2 seeded and minced green chilies

1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup hot water

1-2 Tbsp coarsely chopped fresh coriander leaves or 1 Tbsp dry (optional)

Cut the cabbage into quarters, and core out the stem from each quarter.  Shred the cabbage into 1/2-inch thick shreds.  Heat the oil over med-high heat in a large heavy-bottomed pan.  When the oil is hot, add cumin.  When cumin turns dark brown (10-15 sec), add asafoetida (if using it), and immediately add the shredded cabbage.  Sprinkle turmeric over the cabbage and saute, turning and tossing rapidly until cabbage is wilted (about 5 min).

Add ginger, tomato (sauce), and chilies or red pepper, and continue cooking for an additional 5 min.  Add salt and water.  Reduce heat to med-low and cook the cabbage, covered, until it is tender and the water is absorbed into the vegetables (about 20 min).  Check and stir often while it is cooking to prevent burning.  Fold in coriander leaves, check for salt, and serve.

 

* What is asafoetida? It's a flavor enhancer and a standard component of Indian cuisine, click here to learn more about it.



Roasted Beet and Shoot Salad
Serve this salad with a slice of the focaccia on the side for a light lunch or dinner, or serve it as an accompaniment for a heartier meal. Serves 4.

1 TB apple cider or white wine vinegar
1 TB minced shallot (optional)
sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4 tsp sweet paprika
pinch cayenne pepper (optional)
1/8 tsp ground cumin
1 TB freshly squeezed lemon juice
6 TB sunflower or extra virgin olive oil

4 small to medium roasted beets, chopped in 1/2" pieces*
2 cups mixed sunflower and radish shoots
Shredded cabbage and carrots
1/4 cup crumbled feta
1 TB toasted pine nuts

To make the dressing, combine the first 8 ingredients in a food processor. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking. Toss together the beets, shoots, and shredded veggies. Sprinkle with cheese and pine nuts. Drizzle with desired amount of dressing.*To roast

 

*To roast your beets - 2 variations

Pre-heat your oven to 400F.

 

Variation 1: peel beets and cut into wedges. Mix with oil, salt and pepper. Roast for 45 or so minutes, until tender. Ready to eat out of the oven.

Variation 2: This version is easier than #1 but I don't think it's as tasty. Wrap whole beets in foil. Roast in oven about 45-60 minutes, until tender. Once they've cooled a bit the skins will slip right off.

 

 

 

Cream of Spinach Soup Recipe
Here's a great way to use your frozen spinach.
 
1 package frozen spinach, thawed
1 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup butter
3 medium potatoes, peeled and quartered (about 1 pound)
1 1/2 cups chicken broth (or vegetable broth for vegetarian option)
1 1/2 cups water
2 chicken bouillon cubes (or vegetable bouillon cubes for vegetarian option)
2 cups half-and-half
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
3/4 cup sour cream
Optional: chopped chives and/or ground allspice for garnish

In a large saucepan over medium heat, sauté onion in butter for 3 minutes or until limp. Add potatoes, chicken broth, water, and bouillon cubes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Add spinach and cook for 2 to 4 minutes longer until spinach is tender.

Working in batches, purée soup mixture in a blender. Return to saucepan. Whisk in half-and-half, salt and pepper.

Over low heat, bring to just before simmering. Whisk in the sour cream. You may want to use an immersion blender to get the sour cream fully incorporated.

This soup can be served hot or chilled. Garnish with chopped chives, sprinkles of allspice, or a dollop of sour cream.

 

 

 

Creamy Turnip Soup

This recipe, adapted from Eating Well November/December 2012, is a geat way to enjoy your turnips. "The mini salad on top is optional, but we love the bit of texture from the greens and pop of flavor from the vinaigrette."


4 medium turnips (about 1 1/2 pounds)

1 1/2 cups shoots
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 tablespoon butter
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
1/2 teaspoon salt plus a pinch, divided
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper plus a pinch, divided
4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup shredded carrot
2 tablespoons thinly sliced scallion greens
2 teaspoons white-wine vinegar

Peel and slice turnips. Heat 1 tablespoon oil and butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the turnips, rosemary, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon white pepper; stir to combine. Cover and cook, stirring once or twice, for 10 minutes.

 

Add broth, increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer, cover and cook until the turnips are tender, 10 to 12 minutes more.

 

Meanwhile, toss the shoots ) in a medium bowl with carrot, scallion greens, vinegar, the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and pinch of salt and pepper.

 

Puree the soup in the pan using an immersion blender or transfer to a regular blender and blend until smooth. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.) Serve each portion of soup topped with a generous 1/4 cup of the salad.

 

 

 

Zucchini-Potato Frittata
Frittatas are so adaptable and this one would be happy to have the addition of any other veggies- peppers, cooked carrots, shallots, even some spinach.  Frittatas are my go-to recipe when there's nothing in the house for dinner!  The recipe has been adapted from Andrea Chessman's Serving up the Harvest. Serves 4-6.

1 medium zucchini (or half a bag of frozen)
4-5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (or sunflower)
1.5 lbs potatoes
1 large onion
1/4 lb bacon or some ham, diced
6 eggs
1 cup grated cheddar

Thaw zucchini. Squeeze out extra juice and set aside.

Heat 3 TB oil over medium-high heat in a large well-seasoned cast iron skillet or ovenproof nonstick skillet. Add the potatoes and onion, reduce the heat to med-low, and cook, flipping and stirring occasionally until the potatoes are soft, about 20 mins (you can cover to speed the process and hold in moisture). Increase the heat to medium-high and continue cooking, tossing occasionally, until potatoes are brown, about 5 minutes. Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon but keep the skillet on the burner.

Add the zucchini and bacon to the skillet and saute over medium high heat, until the bacon/ham is cooked. Remove zucchini and bacon. Keep the skillet over the heat.

Beat the eggs and pepper to taste in a medium bowl until well blended. Fold in the potatoes, zucchini and bacon, and cheese.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Add 1-2 TB oil to the skillet as needed to lightly coat the bottom. Pour in the egg mixture, reduce heat to med-low, and cook without stirring until the bottom is set about 10 minutes. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake until the top is set, 5 to 15 minutes, checking every 5 mins.

Place a serving plate on top of the skillet and carefully invert. The frittata should fall out of the pan. Cut into wedges and serve.

 

 

 

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