Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - March 13, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Shoots, Spinach, Cilantro, Beets, Russet Potatoes, Sunchokes, and Radicchio


EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Spinach, Beets, Yellow Onions, Russet Potatoes, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Squash

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Vermont Fresh Foods makes this fettucine specially for us! It's made with either an organic white flour from Quebec or flour from Norwich's King Arthur Flour. Vermont Fresh Foods has been producing fresh pasta, ravioli, and sauces since 1992. Fresh pasta is a simple pleasure and cooks in just a couple minutes. It makes a wonderful, quick, and easy meal topped with fresh veggies. Try throwing in some spinach along with the pasta and pesto.
Pete's Greens Sweet Basil Pesto: Last summer we grew a lot of basil and stockpiled pesto for Good Eats. This pesto contains our own basil blended with olive oil, romano and parmesan cheese, sunflower seeds, garlic, lemon juice and salt. It is tasty slathered on bread or added to pasta with grated cheese on top. If you like yours garlicky - add some minced fresh garlic to your cooked pasta before mixing the pesto with the pasta. The pesto will come to you frozen. To use, simply thaw and eat as is or add to your dishes. It will keep in your fridge a couple weeks, but if you won't use the entire tub right away, just throw it back in the freezer! It keeps really well. 
Eggs!
Cheese Share: Weybridge Cheese is aged at the Cellars at Jasper Hill in Greensboro. Patty and Roger Scholten manage a small herd of Dutch Belt cows in the rolling landscape of Weybridge, VT. Organic, high quality milk production has helped the Scholtens survive a competitive milk market; farmstead cheese is now a strategy for the business to thrive into the next generation. 
Their Weybridge cheese is an organic, lactic set cheese with a delicate bloomy rind. The lightly aged style is meant to showcase the Scholtens’ rich and complex Dutch Belt milk. The thin rind surrounds a delicate creamline, showing a toasty, mushroom flavor in pleasant contrast to the bright acidity of the dense, milky core. The small medallion format appeals to any occasion - a snack for two or a garnish for a larger spread. Weybridge’s rich, milky flavor makes it an ideal breakfast cheese alongside berry preserves and freshly baked bread. Classic beverage pairings include dry, bubbly white, sparkling apple cider or a crisp German pilsner.

Around the Farm

It seems like every time a little bit of spring comes, it gets batted down by another snow squall! The warm, sunny days late last week worked wonders on our greenhouse crops and have some nice greens for you this week and coming up.
We run our greenhouses year round, heating them in winter and opening them up to natural light and heat come spring. You'll hear us talking a lot about soil and sun grown veggies over the next several months. Part of our ethos here at Pete's Greens is that our veggies are all soil and sun grown! Why does this matter? Because stewardship of the land, water, and air are really important to us. As we lay out our planting and harvesting schedule, we plan out how to rotate our crops and grow better soil along with better crop yields. This means we rotate where we plant things from year to year, letting fields lay fallow or cover cropping them according to what kind of enrichment they need. Each field is a little bit different. Some fields may need more nitrogen while others need potassium. Some need to have a little less of one mineral and a little more of another. In some places, adding wood ash is a benefit and in others, it's planting a tree buffer. The non-veggie crops that we plant provide something back to the soil to keep it healthy, which in turn means better tasting veggies, less water runoff, and more biological diversity.
We believe that veggies are best when grown in soil -- aided by natural sunlight and the photosynthetic process. This might be more labor intensive but not as dependent on machines, energy, or fertilizers as other growing processes, like hydroponics. This keeps our farm part of an ecological system that is greater than us, and that will eventually outlive all of us!
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: This week's mix includes green mizuna, claytonia, shoots, spinach, and cress - a very green mix! We recommend washing your greens before eating and use within a week.
Cilantro: A member of the carrot family and related to parsley, cilantro is the leaves and stems of the coriander plant (the seeds of the same plant are the spice known as coriander). Cilantro has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking. The leaves and stems can be chopped and added to salads, soups and sauces, and can garnish many meals. I toss cilantro into any Mexican dish I am making, and love it in summer when I have tomatoes to make salsa. If you can't use all your cilantro just yet and wish to save it for a future dish, you can freeze it. Wash and gently dry your cilantro with paper towels. Then either put sprigs loosely in a plastic bag and freeze them. Or lightly chop cilantro, measure by the tablespoon into ice trays, fill remaining space in ice tray with water, and then after cubes are frozen, store in a plastic bag. You can take one out and thaw anytime you need to use it.
Beets: This week we have red, chioggia, or gold beets, or a mix! Chioggias are the red skinned/ striped flesh beets and gold beets are gold on the inside and outside.
Radicchio: This lettuce relative is actually a chicory, which has a bitter punch of flavor. Radicchio makes a great addition to salads for a pop of color and a contrast in flavor. You can also use the leaves as a base for hors d'oeuvres, or sauté them for a side dish. Pairs well with full-flavored cheeses, balsamic vinegar, and honey. Try chopping it finely and soaking in water to tame the bite!
Sunchokes: You might know of this plant as a beautiful yellow flower on tall stalks that blooms in summer. The tubrous roots, which appear in your shares, are also edible. Eat with or without the skin, and prepare as you would potatoes: roast, saute, bake, boil, or steam. They can be stored for a few weeks in your fridge.

Recipes

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
This recipe comes from a blog whose writer first tried sunchokes in their CSA basket. If you're new to them too, this sounds like a great family-friendly way to try them out!
1 garlic clove
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
2 shallots, sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup grated fontina cheese
salt and pepper
Preparation
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a 9×9 ceramic dish with cooking spray. Cut the garlic clove in half and rub the cut sides onto the dish. Discard garlic.
Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes. Sprinkle the sliced shallots on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper. Pour milk all over the vegetables. Sprinkle with the fontina cheese.
Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes. Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Simple Roasted Sunchokes
.5 pound sunchokes, sliced into half-inch rounds
.5 pound potatoes or carrots, sliced into half inch rounds
2 Tablespoons oil
1 TB lemon juice
Sprinkle with dried Rosemary or thyme
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Toss the sunchokes with the oil & lemon juice. Sprinkle with the herbs. Bake in a shallow gratin dish with the herbs for thirty to forty-five minutes or until done. (Pierce them with the tip of a knife. They should be mostly tender but offer some resistance. Don’t let them get mushy.) Sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve immediately.
Cilantro and Potato soup
This is a delicious, satisfying soup. Like most soup recipes, there is lots of room for improvisation here with some options given below.
2 TB olive oil or butter
2 medium onions, finely chopped (or 2 leeks)
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 quart chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
2 medium potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped
salt and pepper
1 pinch red pepper flakes
2/3 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped
lime juice
Saute onion and garlic slowly until tender. Add the broth, potatoes. Cook til the potatoes are tender about half an hour. Add most of the cilantro leaving a few tablespoons for garnish. Use an immersion blender or food processor to puree. Serve hot or cold, and garnish with the remaining fresh cilantro. Add a squeeze of fresh lime juice before serving.
Optional: add 1 diced, seeded jalapeno pepper along with the broth and potatoes. Add up to 1/4 cup of cream to soup just before serving. Add a couple chopped scallions to the soup after pureeing.
Roasted Beet, Shoot and Sprout Salad
Serve this salad with a slice of the focaccia on the side for a light lunch or dinner, or serve it as an accompaniment for a heartier meal. Serves 4.
1 TB apple cider or white wine vinegar
1 TB minced shallot (optional)
sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4 tsp sweet paprika
pinch cayenne pepper (optional)
1/8 tsp ground cumin
1 TB freshly squeezed lemon juice
6 TB sunflower or extra virgin olive oil
4 small to medium roasted beets, chopped in 1/2" pieces* 
2 cups mixed sunflower and radish shoots
1 cup sprouted beans
1/4 cup crumbled feta
1 TB toasted pine nuts
To make the dressing, combine the first 8 ingredients in a food processor. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking. Toss together the beets, shoots, and sprouts. Sprinkle with cheese and pine nuts. Drizzle with desired amount of dressing. 
Glenn's Roasted Beet Salad
This recipe comes to you from a CSA member who loves beets! If you have a great recipe or unique way that you enjoy your veggies please let us know. I love hearing from our members!
2 medium beets, peeled and cubed
4oz goat or feta cheese
1/2 med red onion, chopped
1 handful dried cranberries or raisins
1 handful toasted walnuts or pecans
3-4 cups Lettuce (mixed lettuces or spinach works too)

Dressing:
1/2 cup Olive Oil
1/4 cup cider vinegar
2 tbsp Mayonnaise
2 tbsp Honey
1tsp crushed garlic
Toss the beet cubes in olive oil, salt and pepper and roast at 350 for 30 mins - 1 hour. Stir them every 15 mins until they are roasted and a little crispy on the edges. Cool.
Combine dressing ingredients. Combine salad ingredients with the beets except the nuts in a separate bowl.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - March 6, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Green Bunch, Shoots, Carrots, Mixed Onions, Fenway Red Potatoes, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Veggie

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Green Bunch, Shoots*, Carrots, Yellow Onions, Fenway Red Potatoes, Rutabaga
*Craftsbury & Cabot - Waitsfield will get their shoots next week!

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Butterworks Farm Yogurt: From Jack and Anne Lazor and their family in Westfield, VT comes Butterworks Farm's organic, Jersey-milk yogurt! This is a cream top yogurt. Their cows are raised on an organic diet. I had a chance to chat with Jack & Anne a couple of weeks ago at the NOFA Winter Conference. A picture of them is below!
Champlain Orchards Apples: Eco-grown apples from the Champlain Valley! These Mutsu/ Crispin apples are a greenish golden variety that are crisp and clean eating. It's great for baking and also stores well.
Golden Crops Rolled Oats: are from organic grower Michel Gaudreau and Golden Crops Mill, just across the Vermont border in Quebec. Michel grows quite a few different grains on his farm and mills grains for organic growers in his area. He has a great operation in a beautiful setting surrounded by his fields. Michel's Golden Crops Mill makes many organic grains available locally that we might not otherwise have local access to. These are beautiful, clean organic rolled oats ideal for oatmeal, granola, cookies, streusel toppings etc.

Meat Share

This month features two items from VT99, a Pete's Greens pastured chicken, and burger from McKnight Farm!
Andouille sausage is new from VT99. Andouille is a French style smoked pork mixed with a variety of seasonsings. In the US, it is the backbone of Creole style cooking -- great for gumbo! Or enjoy the sausages on a bun. And, we have VT99 bacon back! Sliced bacon, perfect for those lazy Sunday morning brunches.
Our own farm-raised chickens could be seen growing up along Cemetery Road in Craftsbury. They are great for whole roasting. Be sure to save the bones for broth!
McKnight Farm burger is versatile ' use for patties, meatballs, Mexican night, casseroles, lasagna... growing up ground beef was a staple in my home!
Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Thinking about andouille sausage got me thinking about gumbo which got me thinking about my trip to New Orleans a few weeks ago and about Mardi Gras, which is coming right up! Try subbing celeriac for the celery and hit the freezer for sweet peppers to throw in. Recipe adapted from The Chicago Tribune Cookbook. Serves 8.
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 chicken, about 4 lbs, quartered
1/2 cup flour
1 pound andouille, cut into 1/4 inch-thick-slices (or crumbled)
2 cups each, chopped onion, chopped celery
1 cup chopped green onions
1/4 chopped parsley
5 large cloves garlic, minced
2 quarts chicken stock
3 bay leaves, crumbled
2 1/2 tsp salt, or to taste
1 tsp each: dried leaf thyme, freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 1/2 to 3 TB file powder
cooked rice or barley
hot pepper sauce to taste
Heat oil in a 7 or 9 quart heavy Dutch oven over medium heat. Add chicken quarters in single layer. Cook until brown on all sides. Remove and reserve chicken. Add flour to hot oil and stir until smooth. Cook and stir constantly, over medium-high heat, until roux is the color of cinnamon. Remove from heat. Stir in sliced sausage, yellow onions, celery, green onions, green pepper, parsley and garlic. Cook and stir over medium heat until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes.
Stir in 1/2 cup of the chicken broth, scraping up brown bits from bottom of the pan. Stir in browned chicken, bay leaves, salt, thyme, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Stir in remaining broth. Heat to boil over medium heat. Skim off surface scum. Reduce heat to low; simmer, uncovered until chicken is tender, 35-45 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings.
Remove chicken pieces from gumbo. Skim all fat from surface of gumbo. Remove skin and bones from chicken and discard. Shred chicken and add back to pot. Reheat to boil. Remove from heat; let simmer die down. Add file powder and stir. Let stand 5 minutes. Serve in soup bowls over rice or barley. Pass the hot pepper sauce. 
 
Green bunch ID:
Left, from top to bottom: Sorrel, Chard
Right, from top to bottom: Red Russian Kale, Upland Cress, Parsley, Red Mizuna
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A mix of spinach, red & green sorrel, shoots, cress, and baby kale.
Fenway Red Potatoes: Fenway Red potatoes have a beautiful deep and rich red skin with contrasting white flesh. This all-purpose variety has the perfect texture to hold up to nearly any cooking technique- boiling, mashing, roasting or baking. Store potatoes in a cool, dark location.
Green Bunches: We have a variety of green bunches going out in the shares this week! You may find Red Russian Kale, Upland Cress, Parsley, Chard, Red Mizuna, or Green Sorrel in your bag. Parsley is a nutritious herb that will pair very well with your potatoes this week! Red Russian Kale is tender and flavorful, great for eating raw or cooking. Upland cress is a little pungent cross between arugula and horseradish and is nice when added raw to sandwiches or anywhere a little crisp of green adds flavor or toss it into a cooked dish like a soup or pasta, or with fish. Green sorrel was a surprise to many members last week! Similar to the other greens, use in salads, soups, or stews, cooked or raw. Mizuna is a Japanese mustard green with tender, pointy-lobed leaves and a pleasant, peppery flavor. You could substitute it, chopped, in a salad calling for arugula. It adds a nice zest to a stir-fry or saute too. Store mizuna, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Use a food processor to blend a handful of upland cress or sorrel with a cup of creme fraiche or sour cream and a few garlic cloves for a zesty side to grilled meats or blend into soups. Store greens in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer for 1-2 weeks. We recommend storing parsley upright in a glass of water.
Rutabaga: Rutabaga grows particularly well in colder climates, and is especially popular in Sweden (where it earned its second name, swede).  Rutabagas should be peeled before use. Some rutabagas may have come out of the ground with superficial worm track markings. Don't be deterred if your rutabagas have these marks. Just peel or slice off the outer layer (which you need to do anyway) and the inside should be just fine. Keep them loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your fridge and they'll last for several weeks at least. Roast it, mash it with butter, season with salt and pepper, cook it like a fry, you can't go wrong.

Recipes

Baked Oatmeal
Serves 12 (or a family of four for 3 mornings)
This recipe is about making your morning routine healthier and easier. Whip up a pan on Sunday, and wrap yourself around a hot bowl of slightly sweet, nourishing whole grains for the rest of the week. You can get creative with toppings, too, making each morning a little something special. Kid-friendly, too!
2 tablespoons coconut oil (melted) or pastured butter
3 organic eggs
3½ cups raw, whole milk, or a vegan milk of choice
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
½ cup maple syrup (or other natural sweetener)
4 cups rolled oats
1½ tablespoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup frozen raspberries
½ cup raisins or chopped dried apricots
1 cup crushed walnuts, almonds, or pumpkin seeds (optional)
In a medium bowl, whisk together coconut oil (or butter), eggs, milk, maple syrup and vanilla. In a separate bowl, combine the rest of the ingredients. Slowly fold the dry ingredients into the wet mixture. Use a little oil to grease a baking pan (I use a 8.5 x 13-inch pan) and pour in contents. Bake at 350 degrees for about 35-45 minutes. Reheat in toaster oven each morning for an easy, healthy breakfast and top with your favorite whole yogurt, nut butter, hemp seeds, whatever you fancy!
Sorrel Soup 
This is a very simple light soup that highlights the fresh, slightly lemony flavor of the sorrel. It's from the Sundays at Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen.
2 c. well-packed, washed and stemmed sorrel leaves
1 medium onion, chopped
3 T. butter
1 T. unbleached white flour
3 c. vegetable stock
2 egg yolks
1 c. milk or half and half
salt and freshly ground black pepper
dash of Tabasco or other hot sauce (optional)
Finely chop the sorrel leaves. In a medium saucepan, sauté the onion in the butter until translucent. Stir in the flour. Mix in the sorrel and cook for a minute or so, just until it wilts. Add the vegetable stock. Bring the soup to a low simmer and cook for about 3 minutes. Beat the egg yolks and milk in a medium mixing bowl. Slowly add 2 c. of the hot soup while stirring constantly. Stir this soup-egg mixture into the soup pot. Reheat the soup gently but don’t let it boil. Add salt, pepper to taste and a dash of Tabasco, if you like. 
Braised Winter Greens w/ Garlic and Balsamic Vinegar
Beet Greens, Mizuna and Kale are ideal for this recipe but some Pac Choi leaves would work in nicely too! From the Rebar Modern Food Cookbook by Audrey Austerberg and Wanda Urbanowicz.
1 large bunch 0f Greens
1 TB olive oil
2 garlic cloves
1/4 tsp red chile flakes
1 TB balsamic vinegar
cracked pepper to taste
Stem and wash the greens. Heat a skillet over medium heat, add oil, then garlic and stir until lightly golden. Add the chiles and greens. Toss with tongs, sprinkle with salt, and cover to allow volume to steam down. Uncover and continue to toss on high heat until greens are wilted. Add vinegar. Remove greens from pan. Return pan to burner. Reduce any remaining juices and drizzle over greens. Crack pepper over the top and serve immediately.
Serves 2
Roasted Roots Side Dish
6 cups mixed root veggies of choice (parsnips, turnips, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, celeriac, potatoes, carrots, etc.) cut into uniform bite size pieces
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 Tbsp. sunflower oil or olive oil
3 Tbsp. white wine, sherry,
apple cider, broth, or water
2 Tbsp. chopped thyme
salt & pepper to taste
Combine garlic, liquids, herbs, salt & pepper in large oven proof baking pan.
Stir in root veggies & bake at 450 degrees for about 45 minutes, stirring several times, until done.
If you have leftovers, this makes a delicious soup added to vegetable/chicken broth & pureed with some cream.
Carrot with Toasted Almond Soup
This recipe comes from a shareholder who said, "even the kids like it!" Garnish with plain yogurt or creme fraiche, if it's in your fridge. Serves 4 as a first course.
1 cup sliced onions
1 Turkish or 1/2 California bay leaf
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
Rounded 3/4 teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme, or 1/3 tsp dried, crumbled
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter
1 small boiling potato (3 oz), peeled and cut into 1/2" cubes
1 1/2 lb carrots, peeled and cut crosswise 1/4 inch thick
2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth (14 fl oz), or vegetable stock
1 cup applesauce 
1 1/4 cups water
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
Cook onions, bay leaf, ginger, curry powder, and thyme in butter in a 2- to 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until shallots are softened and pale golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Add potato to shallot mixture along with carrots, broth, applesauce, water, salt, and pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until carrots are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Discard bay leaf.
Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender until smooth, transferring as blended to a large bowl (use caution when blending hot liquids). Return to saucepan to reheat if necessary. Serve soup sprinkled with almonds.
Cooks' notes:
•Soup can be made 2 days ahead and cooled completely, uncovered, then chilled, covered. Reheat over low heat. Thin with additional water if necessary.
•Almonds can be toasted 2 days ahead and cooled completely, then kept in an airtight container at room temperature.
Parsley Pesto
1 cup parsley leaves (thin stems are okay), rinsed and dried
salt
1/2 clove garlic
1/4 cup sunflower or extra-virgin olive oil, or more
1 tsp apple cider vinegar or freshly squeezed lemon juice
Combine the parsley with a pinch of salt, the garlic, and about 1/2 the oil in a mini-food processor, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container if necessary, and adding the rest of the oil gradually. Add the vinegar, then a little more oil or some water if you prefer a thinner mixture. Taste and adjust the seasoning, then serve or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 27, 2019

Hi folks - Apologies for the tardiness of this week's newsletter. We lost the power for a few hours due to our hurrican-force winds so I'm scrambling to get back on track! Tomorrow is predicted to be pretty darn cold. Please pick up from outdoor sites early! We do our best to protect your veggies but sometimes our Mother Nature has other ideas. - Taylar
A note about reusing packaging: Please bring clean cardboard egg containers back to your site! We'll return them to our egg producers for re-use. And, while we can't reuse your plastic bags, our friends at the Montpelier Food Shelf can, and will! If you return your CLEAN plastic bags to your site, we'll get them to Montpelier. Thanks!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Salad Turnips, Parsley, Black Radish, Radicchio, Yellow Onions, Celeriac, Green Savoy Cabbage, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Cauliflower

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Radicchio, Black Radishes, Celeriac, Green Savoy Cabbage, and
Out of the Bag:
Frozen Cauliflower

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Slowfire Bakery Bread: The theme for this week's pantry share seems to be "young men making it in Vermont's food production world." Slowfire Bakery is run by Scott Medellin, a young baker based in Jeffersonville. He bakes his sourdoughs like this malt country in a wood-fired oven with regionally sourced, organic grains.
Sweet Rowen Farmstead Cheddar: Made in small batches with milk from his heritage lineback breed, this mild cheddar from our friend Paul Lisai down the road is a great melting cheddar, perfect for grilled cheese sandwiches or nachos -- and also is delicious for snacking on! Paul is a young farmer in his mid-30's with his small herd topping out around 65 head. He's been farming for about 10 or so years, with a stint here at Pete's Greens while he was at Sterling College, getting his dairy farm off the ground.
Eggs: Eggs this week from either Axel Mckenzie in Greensboro (at 14, one of our youngest producers in the share) or Ben Butterfield of Besteyfield Farm in Hinesburg. We'll be rotating some of Ben's eggs back into our egg mix. Ben uses ethical, smart, and conscientious practices to raise his hens, resulting in yummy eggs. Ben is a fairly new farmer but has already been "scaling up" his operations. He started his business at the Intervale Center in Burlington before expandng over to Hinesburg.
Cheese Share From Sweet Rowen Farmstead in West Glover (or Albany, depending on who you are) comes Mountain Ash, a bloomy rind cow's milk cheese made with a layer of food grade ash. The rind is completely edible and you'd be missing out if you didn't enjoy it!
Hub, one of the carrot farmers Pete met in the Netherlands
Mr. Nobel's first bulb harvester

Pete's Travel Notes

Last week I took a really interesting trip to Europe to learn about winter carrot harvesting. It's common in central Europe to heavily mulch carrots with straw in the fall and dig them all winter. I've long wanted to experiment with this method as the quality of carrots stored in the soil is exceptional. It would work well in VT in years that we have consistent snow cover (hard to imagine we ever don't this winter!), but in years in which the snow melts and we then get below zero temps, the tops of the carrots would freeze even with a heavy straw mulch. So we'll probably dabble in this method but unlikely as it's too risky to store a large amount of carrots this way. 

I was also looking into different types of carrot harvesters. The harvester we currently use is called a top lifter. It harvests one row at a time. Last year we grew 25 acres of carrots on which we planted 25 million carrot seeds on 121 miles of row! It takes forever to harvest them one row at a time and often in the fall we're racing rain, snow, and mud. We'd like to find a more efficient harvest method. In Europe many farms use harvesters that are called share lifters, they act like a potato digger. I learned a lot watching them in action. 

I also visited some companies that make harvest equipment. At Nobel in the Netherlands, where they make carrot and bulb harvesters, I happened to meet the founder on the factory floor. This is a big place, maybe 3 acres of factory; they send equipment all over the world. Old man Nobel stops in a couple times a month to look things over. The story is that back in the 50's as a kid he worked in a flower bulb warehouse. One day he accidentally tipped over a pallet of flower bulbs that were separated by color. The colors got mixed and his boss made him buy the bulbs. He planted them and when harvest time came decided to build a harvest machine to cut the labor. That launched his company. 
More to come as we explore new options for growing and harvesting our famous carrots!
~Pete
How we harvest carrots now
Above: a video showing how we harvest carrots now
Below: a video showing winter carrot harvest
video

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A mix of spinach, sorrel, shoots, cress, and baby kale.
Radicchio:  A member of the Chicories family along with endive and escarole, radicchio resembles a small red lettuce. Like all the members of this family, the leaves have some bitterness. You can chop radicchio and add it to your salad for some color and extra flavor. It is also quite good brushed with olive oil before tossing on the grill. Try adding some to risotto. Keep unwashed radicchio in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer for up to a week.
Salad Turnips: These fresh baby turnips can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw they have a texture similar to a radish, but are not so sharp. Or slice, dice, or quarter them and saute with butter or oil. Cook until just tender and still a little crisp. Just a little salt or maybe a little bit of vinegar is all they need. Cooked with butter and given a slight drizzle of honey and even picky little eaters may gobble them up. Don't forget the greens! Turnip greens are tender and flavorful. Chop and saute with the turnips for a side dish, or cook up with other greens, or by themselves. I often chop them and toss them into pasta sauces.
Black RadishBlack radishes are firmer, drier, and stronger than other radishes - this is a very different radish from your red/pink globes! You can eat these raw or cooked but they are bitter when eaten raw. Try shredding them to add to a salad, slaw, or relish (peeled or unpeeled), or peel and slice thin, then salt and drain and mix with sour cream as a spread for chewy rye bread. Or, blend minced radish with creamy cheese, smoked fish, or pate. Cooked black radishes taste like turnips but with less reliable cooking time. You can add them to soups, stews, braises, or stir-fries, or chop finely and add to ground raw meat. Wrap unwashed, topped radishes in newspaper or perforated plastic and refrigerate. Don't let them get moist or they will mold. Their taste mellows as they store and are fine for grating and shredding even after months of storage. I recommend scrubbing them before eating, especially if you keep the peel on.
Celeriac: Celeriac, also called celery root, is a vegetable that cleans up well. Once you peel away its gnarled outer layer, you find a sparkling-white interior with a clean, refreshing taste that has wide appeal. Once prepared, it shows no signs of its humble past. Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.

Recipes

Radicchio is a little different taste for many folks. Here are a few recipes to try it out... it's a little bitter so a nice sweet dressing may help the flavor if it's too strong!
Risotto con radicchio
Serves: 4‑6
1 head radicchio plus extra greens if desired
1/2 cup finely chopped white onion
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
5 Tbsp. unsalted butter
6‑7 cups vegetable broth
1 cup dry white wine (or red is great with the radicchio)
1/2 cup freshly grated Italian Parmesan


Radicchio-Cabbage Slaw with Honey
Cabbage and radicchio get the sweet-treatment, thanks to honey. This should be a quick dish!
3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Freshly ground pepper
1 medium head napa cabbage (about 1 pound), halved lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips
2 small heads radicchio (about 8 ounces), halved lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips
Whisk together honey, vinegar, and salt in a small bowl. Add oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking until well blended. Season with pepper. Toss together cabbage and radicchio in a large bowl. Add dressing; toss to combine. Cover, and refrigerate at least 5 minutes. Just before serving, toss again.
Slaw can be refrigerated in an airtight container up to 1 day.

Treviso Radicchio Salad with Walnut Vinaigrette
Aged pecorino Toscano cheese is fairly hard; young pecorino Toscano is softer and milder. You can use good-quality provolone cheese instead, if you like.
8 thin slices pancetta (about 4 ounces)
3 heads Treviso radicchio (about 1 1/2 pounds), quartered lengthwise
1/2 cup walnut oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 cup champagne vinegar
2/3 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 ounces shaved young pecorino
Toscano cheese
Heat a medium skillet over medium-low heat; arrange pancetta in skillet in a single layer. Cook, turning occasionally, until crisp, about 12 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Break into 1-inch pieces.
Put radicchio in a large bowl. Add oil to skillet; heat over medium heat. Add shallots; immediately remove skillet from heat. Whisk in vinegar, walnuts, salt, and pepper; pour over radicchio. Toss well. Top with pancetta and cheese.
Bandh Gobhi Ki Sabzi (Buttered Smothered Cabbage)
Here's a traditional cabbage dish that will be great using the Savoy cabbage.
1 savoy cabbage (1-3/4 to 2 lbs)
2 Tbl ghee, butter or oil
1-1/2 tsp cumin seeds
1/4 tsp ground asafoetida (optional)
1/4 tsp turmeric
1 Tbl minced ginger root or 1/2 tsp dry
1 8 oz can tomato sauce or 1 cup chopped fresh ripe tomato (1 large)
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper or 1-2 seeded and minced green chilies
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup hot water
1-2 Tbl coarsely chopped fresh coriander leaves or 1 Tbl dry (optional)
Cut the cabbage into quarters, and core out the stem from each quarter. Shred the cabbage into 1/2-inch thick shreds. Heat the oil over med-high heat in a large heavy-bottomed pan. When the oil is hot, add cumin. When cumin turns dark brown (10-15 sec), add asafoetida (if using it), and immediately add the shredded cabbage. Sprinkle turmeric over the cabbage and sauté, turning and tossing rapidly until cabbage is wilted (about 5 min).
Add ginger, tomato (sauce), and chilies or red pepper, and continue cooking for an additional 5 min. Add salt and water. Reduce heat to med-low and cook the cabbage, covered, until it is tender and the water is absorbed into the vegetables (about 20 min). Check and stir often while it is cooking to prevent burning. Fold in coriander leaves, check for salt, and serve.
Scalloped Celeriac and Potatoes

Serves 6
butter for greasing the baking dish
1 pound celeriac, peeled, halved, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
1 pound baking potatoes, peeled, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated Gruyère or domestic Swiss cheese, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons butter
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Place the celeriac and potatoes in alternating layers in the baking dish, seasoning every few layers with salt and pepper. At about the halfway point, add 1/3 cup cheese in an even layer; sprinkle with the thyme. Continue with the celeriac and potatoes, until you have used all of your slices (don’t go all the way to the top edge; leave a little room to allow the liquid to boil).
Pour the stock over the celeriac and potatoes. Dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 15 minutes more. Sprinkle the remaining 2/3 cup cheese over the top layer, add several grindings of fresh pepper, and bake until the cheese turns golden, about 15 minutes.
Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com