Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - September 19, 2018

ONLY TWO MORE DELIVERIES LEFT IN THIS SHARE SEASON!
SIGN UP TODAY TO KEEP YOUR WEEKLY DELIVERIES COMING!


This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Kohlrabi, Chioggia Beets, Broccoli, Sweet Peppers, Poblano Peppers, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes


Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Spinach, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Carmen Peppers, Orange Carrots,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes




Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Spinach, Tomatillos, Eggplant, Lettuce, Fennel, Chioggia Beets, Garlic, Shishito Peppers, Potatoes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes


Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Spinach, Napa cabbage, Chard, Radishes,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Pint Lunchbox Peppers




Bread Share

Slowfire Bakery

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Farm Yogurt, Champlain Orchards Pears, Slowfire Bakery bread

Cheese Share

Lazy Lady Farm
Geebus

Around the Farm

Busy, busy fall. Hundreds of acres of winter rye cover crop are being prepped and seeded and potato harvest starts tomorrow. It looks like a nice fat crop. We're wrapping up a bit of haying and generally are way too spoiled by the prolonged dry weather we've enjoyed all summer. Many wells in the area are dry but there has been enough moisture for good crop growth and it sure is convenient to hardly ever be rained out. Our 25 acre storage carrot crop is looking great, I have high hopes that it will come through with bigger and sweeter yields than ever. I've been looking into specialized equipment that will remove all the rocks from ag soils down to 8 inches deep. We have lots of rocky land that damages equipment and makes it hard to keep crops cleanly weeded. This would be an initially expensive, but likely very cheap in the long run, leap into clearing all our land of stones.
The field crew is tired, we're doing our best to find partial days of rest here and there but there is so much to get done.
~ Pete
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
The Fall/ Winter Share starts in just TWO WEEKS! Sign up today for your share of our harvest! Fall is always our most popular share season. You get the tail end of our summer harvest plus all the fall favorites like squash, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and the start of our root crop harvest. Potatoes are starting to come in, we have storage carrots aplenty, and on deck for harvest are parsnips, sunchokes, turnips, and more. We have greens bunches still coming in, like kale and chard, and we plan for greens every week of the share!
Sign up today so you don't forget!
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach:  A booming spinach crop this week led to a 6 am switcharoo to spinach for this week's greens!
Chioggia BeetsAn Italian variety, chioggias have alternating white and pink rings of color on the inside. The outside is lighter and more pinkish than traditional red beets. They are smooth and mild tasting. To prevent chioggias from bleeding their color, roast them whole then slice crosswise to show off the beautiful rings. Roasted this way, they make a stunning addition to a salad. Roast and store cooked chioggia beets separately from your red beets to prevent the chioggias from being dyed red.
Tomatillos:  A tomatillo is a Mexican fruit similar to a tomato that remains firm and green when ripe. Tomatillos grow inside lantern-shaped paper husks, which must be removed. Wash the tomatillos well to remove the sticky substance that keeps the husks in place. Because they are acidic, tomatillos are rarely used raw. Roast them to rid them of excess liquid and soften their texture. Roasted with some fresh chiles, they can be turned into a quick salsa in the blender. Tomatillos exude a lot of liquid and seeds as they roast. Scrape all the flavorful juices into the blender. Store tomatillos in their husks in a paper bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.
Carmen Pepper: These sweet peppers (which may be green, red, or multicolored) are a delight! The Carmen is an Italian pepper named for its bull's horn shape ('corno di toro'). These are wonderful roasted. You can freeze them whole or in slices if needed.
Eggplant: You may notice some similarities between last week's share and this week's. That's because this is the last week of our eggplants! We harvested every last one of them...  
Lunchbox Peppers: These "mini" bell peppers might look hot but they're actually quite mild! Lunchbox refers to the assortment of colors - yellow, orange, and red - that you might get. All are sweet. Try stuffing them, making a relish, or adding some pizzazz to whatever dish you're making!

Featured Recipes

Roasted Eggplant and Mushrooms with Dill Sauce
1 lb mushrooms (depending on size; portobella, crimini, or oyster are best)
1 lb eggplant, skin removed, cubed
1/4 c. butter
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 c. heavy whipping cream
1/2 c. broth (vegetable or meat)
1/4 c. white wine
1/4 c. freshly chopped dill
1/4 - 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Salt & pepper
Directions
Preheat oven to 425F.    
In a large cast iron skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and cook for about 5 minutes. Toss in the eggplant and season with salt and pepper. Cook for a few more minutes. Toss in the garlic and cayenne pepper and cook for about 1 minute.
Move the pan into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Remove and toss. Cook for another 5 minutes if necessary.
Return pan to stove. Stir in wine and cook until all liquid has almost dissipated. Stir in broth, cream, and dill. Season if necessary. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and serve over your favorite pasta or rice. Garnish with green onions.
Roasted Tomatillo Salsa
1 pint tomatillo (your shares have 1 pound)
Small onion, minced
1/2 c minced cilantro
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
Hot pepper to taste, either red pepper flakes or fresh minced chile pepper
Half carmen pepper, optional, to taste
Rinse the tomatillos and roast in their jackets @ 450 for 10 or 15 minutes. They should brown but not burst open. Cool to handle & peel off the husks. Fork mash the tomatillos in a bowl then mix in all other ingredients. Taste for salt & spice.
You can also pulse all together in a food processor.
Use this salsa with any Mexican dish, enchiladas, tacos, huevos rancheros, beans & rice, etc. Also great with grilled fish, etc.

Quinoa Stuffed Carmen Peppers
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
1 pound ground beef (optional)
1 1/2 c quinoa, prepared (optional)
2 c cheese, 1/2 reserved for top
Carmen peppers, halved and seeded
Sour cream
Cilantro
Scallions
Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Arrange Carmen peppers in a large casserole dish. Saute onions for 3 - 5 minutes until they soften and turn translucent. Add jalapeno and saute for another 3 0 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
If using ground beef, heat a skillet over medium-high heat and add a tsp of oil. Place ground beef in the pan (sprinkle with any seasoning) and stir frequently, browning and breaking apart all pieces. This should take 7 - 10 minutes.
In large bowl, combine quinoa, beef, and cheese. Stuff peppers with quinoa mix and top with extra cheese. Cover with foil, bake for 35 - 40 minutes. Remove foil for last 10 minutes of baking.
Sprinkle with cilantro and scallions, serve with sour cream and tomatillo salsa.
Braised Fennel and Potatoes
In this dish the potatoes are perked up with fennel. The fennel becomes very tender and lends loads of moisture to the dish. Gourmet February 2006.
1 large fennel bulb with fronds
1 large onion, halved lengthwise, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices (2 cups)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lb potatoes
1/2 cup water
Quarter bulb lengthwise and core, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Cook fennel, onion, pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, covered, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, about 5 minutes.Meanwhile, cut potatoes crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Add potatoes and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt to fennel mixture and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently, 3 minutes. Add water and cook, covered, stirring once, until potatoes are tender, 10 to 12 minutes more.
Italian Cauliflower
This is best when the cauliflower is just tender, not mushy. Put a couple of sausages on the grill and toss a salad. There's dinner. Serves 4.
1 cauliflower, cut into florets
3 TB oil
1 medium onion, diced
3 TB vinegar
1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes
salt & pepper
red pepper flakes
minced Italian flat parsley
Heat oil in a wide deep skillet and saute onion until translucent. Add cauliflower and a couple tablespoons of water. Continue cooking and stirring often. When cauliflower and onion begin to brown a bit, add the vinegar. Cover and cook until vinegar cooks off. Stir in tomatoes, season with salt and pepper, pepper flakes, and parsley. Simmer covered until cauliflower is tender, about 5 to 10 minutes.
 

Pantry Lore 

This week members are receiving yogurt from Butterworks Farm, pears from Champlain Orchards, and bread from Slowfire Bakery. Butterworks, in Westfield, makes the cream top yogurt you're about to dive into. Fully pastuerized, grass fed, organically raised cows! You can taste all the deliciousness in the yogurt.
Champlain Orchards in Shoreham grows fruit "eco-consciously". These pears are the Shinsui variety. This is a green-yellow pear and it both darkens and sweetens as it ripens. They're excellent for pies, if you're a baker!
Eggs are coming for Sebring Rd, Shelburne Vineyard, Charlotte, NRG Systems, Randall St, Metro Rock, and Center Rd. members.
Cheese Share members receive a piece of Sweet Geebus from Lazy Lady Farm! If you ever get the chance to meet Laini Fondillier, the owner/ cheesemaker/ head honcho over at Lazy Lady, please do! She's a real hoot. Laini is now making a goat/ sheep milk blend cheese with sheep milk from Neil Urie, who used to make cheese at Bonnieview Farm. This new one has lemon pepper on top and is ripened for 3 weeks. She said of it, "Gets kind of funky looking in a good way".

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - September 12, 2018

This week in your share:

Everyday Large (Orange bags)

Mesclun, Garlic, Edamame, Sweet Peppers, Radish, Cucumber, Carrots, Cippolini Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn
1 pint Husk Cherries

Everyday Standard (Yellow bags)

Mesclun, Garlic, Edamame, Eggplant, Sweet Peppers,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn



Fancy/ Localvore

(Purple bags)

Mesclun, Basil, Cilantro, Hungarian Hot Peppers, Tomatillos, Eggplant, Carrots, Cippolini Onions,
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes
4 ears Sweet Corn
1 pint Husk Cherries

Lean & Green

(Green bags)

Mesclun, Green Kale, Broccoli, Carrots
OUT OF THE BAG
1 Bag of Tomatoes



Bread Share

Mansfield Breadworks

Pete's Pantry

Elmore Mountain Pizza Dough, Pete's Greens Pizza Sauce, Jasper Hill Shred, Eggs (for half the share members - see below)

Cheese Share

Cellars at Jasper Hill
Conundrum

Around the Farm

Routine is important around a farm. We run a tight schedule with every day of the week having a set of tasks. Our schedule of tasks is defined by our deliveries. On Wednesdays (or Thursdays for a few sites) we bring you and our wholesale customers fresh veggies. Our truck goes out again on Saturday. In order to send the freshest food, our Wednesday delivered food is harvested and packed Monday and Tuesday; food for Friday/Saturday deliveries is harvested on Thursday and Friday. 
Your CSA harvests look something like this…In the summer, we harvest tomatoes on Mondays and Thursdays. Also on Mondays, we start washing veggies for CSA. We will pack out some of your items if we can - things like potatoes or carrots that need to be weighed out. Tuesday mornings we harvest all our greens - that can be anywhere from 600 - 1000 pounds of baby greens! We also harvest delicate items like basil, corn, and melons on Tuesdays. The bulk of our work happens on Tuesday. That's when we wash and bag the greens and bag all your veggies. The field crew starts around 5 am harvesting greens and the last of us folks in the warehouse leave around 7 or so. Everything that gets harvested and washed on Mondays, Tuesdays boards a truck on Tuesday night and Wednesday and makes its way across Vermont and then down into NYC. Same veggies, same schedule!
On Wednesdays, the crew focuses on field work and greenhouse work (weeding, transplanting, cleaning out beds, and so on). On Thursday morning the Monday/Tuesday cycle of tasks repeats except that late week we don’t have CSA deliveries - just our wholesale customers.
This week brings us to the three week mark! After today, there are ONLY THREE weeks left of the Summer Share!! Sign up here for your Fall/ Winter Share and eat locally all winter long!
~Taylar
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun:  A beautiful, fresh blend of lettuces, chard, kale, cress, and mizuna this week! We wash the greens but recommend you give them a good rinse before eating. Store in a cold part of your fridge and use quickly.
Tomatillos:  From A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen: "A tomatillo is a Mexican fruit similar to a tomato that remains firm and green when ripe. Tomatillos grow inside lantern-shaped paper husks, which must be removed. Wash the tomatillos well to remove the sticky substance that keeps the husks in place. Because they are quite acidic, tomatillos are rarely used raw. Roast them to rid them of excess liquid and soften their texture. Roasted with some fresh chiles, they can be turned into a quick salsa in the blender. Tomatillos exude a lot of liquid and seeds as they roast. Scrape all the flavorful juices into the blender."
For a decadent breakfast, try frying thick slices of tomatillos alongside a couple of eggs and serve with bacon. The acid of the tomatillos makes a nice foil for the richness of the protein. Store tomatillos in their husks in a paper bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.
Hungarian Hot Wax Pepper: A fun and hot variety of pepper! Popular for frying, stuffing, canning, and pickling.
Edamame: This is the funky looking tree in your boxes! Soybean varieties grown for eating the beans from the pod are called edamame. Long common in the Japanese diet, in recent years edamame has been gaining popularity in the US and now even kids in daycare have their little containers of beans for lunch. And no wonder because it's incredibly easy to prepare, the beans are delicious, and they pack a lot of nutrition into a very small package. A half cup of shelled edamame (from approx 1.25 cups of pods) contains 9 g fiber, 11 g protein, and a good amount of Vitas A and C. Edamame freezes really well too. Just blanch pods in boiling water for 2-3 mins, drain and cool in ice water, and freeze in a single layer, then bag. Edamame should not sit in the fridge for days before you get around to eating it. Like all beans they are better the fresher they are. If you won't eat them in the next few days, freeze them!
Cippolini Onion:  Cippolini onions are a small flattened Italian onion with a sweet, mild flavor. Cippolinis are traditionally served roasted or baked, but also work well on kebabs or eaten fresh. If you have never eaten a roasted cippolini you must, as you will never think of onions the same way. The advantage of the cippolini is its mild flavor that when roasted caramelizes quickly into sweet, flavorful goodness! Their shape lends them well to roasting. Cippolini onions do not store as well as your typical onion so I recommend using them soon. When I packed them, I did a pretty heavy weeding out of some soft ones. If you have a bad cippolini, please let me know. Keep them cool.
Eggplant:  Notes from Melissa about this week's eggplant:
As we prepare for our fall and winter harvest, we are slowly cleaning out our heated greenhouses and planting them in hardy greens to bring us a taste of fresh greens in the coldest Vermont months. This week the eggplants are from our pepper and eggplant house that was planted in mid-April. This house was still in peak production but it has to go to make way for claytonia that was planted last week and the spinach that will be planted next. We will still have peppers and eggplants from our fields until we get a hard frost. The eggplants in your share have quite a bit of variation in the skin color. This color is an indication of the fruit maturity. The darkest purples are immature and the bronzing fruits are starting to mature. As the fruits start to mature they will start to get a hint of bitter that is still delicious in all your favorite eggplant dishes. The dark purple fruits will be slightly sweeter. Taylar's taste tests verified this for us:) I love to roast these eggplants and slip in the freezer for colder days to prepare this soup from smitten kitchen. https://smittenkitchen.com/2010/10/roasted-eggplant-soup/ Enjoy!
Husk Cherries: Husk cherries are in a pint box; these are the little papery husked things that look like tomatillos. In fact they are close cousins of tomatillos and are also related to tomatoes. But they are sweeter and have a diiferent flavor than either. Some liken their taste to vanilla, others to cinnamon bread (!). They are tasty little treat and will be wonderful on your salads this week. They would also be welcome in any dish that cries out for a touch of sweetness. If you don't eat them all straight out of the box.

Featured Recipes

Tomatillo Salsa
There are a lot of variations out there of tomatillo salsa. I've included a couple below. The first is from Alejandra de la Cruz. Alejandra has worked at our farm for several summer seasons. In the winter, she lives in a small mountain village with her family. I spent time with Ale this summer and this salsa is one she made often. Here's her recipe for a simple tomatillo salsa: With water, put tomatillos and jalapeƱos on the stove to stew for 10 minutes until they come to a roiling boil. Cut the heat. Then add a little bit of chopped garlic. Add salt to taste. They will break down.
Garlicky Mushroom Quesadillas with Tomatillo Chile Salsa
This recipe is adapted from the aforementioned "A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen," by Jack Bishop. Serves 3-4.
Tomatillo-Chile Salsa
1 pint tomatillos, husked and washed
2-3 medium jalapenos
2 TB chopped fresh cilantro leaves
Salt
Quesadillas
4 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
8 oz oyster mushrooms, thickly sliced
salt to taste
3 medium garlic cloves, minced
freshly ground black pepper
6 8-inch flour tortillas
4 ounces goat cheese
Preheat oven to 450F. Roast the whole tomatillos and chiles in a rimmed baking sheet on the middle rack of the oven, turning the veggies once, until lightly browned and tender, about 30 minutes. Cool slightly and transfer the tomatillos to a food processor. Cut off the stems of the chiles and add, (seeds and all, for extra heat), to the food processor. Pulse just until combined and still chunky. Scrape the salsa into a bowl and stir in the cilantro and salt to taste.
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the mushrooms and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned lightly, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and pepper to taste and cook until aromatic, about 1 minute. Set the mushroom mixture aside.
Lay 3 tortillas flat on a work surface. Sprinkle goat cheese on top, leaving a 1/2" border around the edges. Divide the mushroom mixture evenly among the tortillas. Top with the remaining tortillas. Heat a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the first quesadilla and cook, turning once, until the tortillas are golden brown and the cheese has melted, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a large plate and repeat with the remaining quesadillas. Cut each quesadilla into quarters. Spoon some salsa into the middle of each quesadilla. Serve the remaining salsa on the side.
Edamame
whole fresh edamame pods
salt (preferably sea salt or kosher salt)
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add edamame and continue boiling until beans are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. To prevent overcooking, start checking for doneness approximately 7 minutes after cooking. (To check, remove one carefully, dip in cold water to cool, and taste.)
When done, run cold water over, or put in ice water, to stop cooking. Drain well; pat excess moisture off, and sprinkle with salt to taste. (Start with 1/2 teaspoon.)
To eat, hold pod by stem end, and slide the individual beans out with your teeth. Discard pod.
Stuffed Peppers
No need for a recipe, just use your imagination. You won't go wrong.
Preheat oven to 400F.
Saute some onions and garlic, and add in some cooked rice, some cooked beans (canned kidney beans come in handy here!), some spices. Once everything is cooked and blended add some cheese (parm perhaps, or gruyere, or feta or goat). Spoon the filling into peppers that are cut in half and place peppers into an oiled baking dish.
Bake for 30 mins or more until peppers are softened and beginning to brown on some edges and filling is hot.
Above, the tomatillo salsa cooking and tortillas frying
Below, Alejandra making tortillas
 

Pantry Lore 

Pizza dough and sauce this week! For real this time! The dough come from Elmore Mountain Bread and is made using ALL VERMONT grown wheat! Let it sit out at room temperature for a few hours to rise. It can be cut into two for two smaller pizzas. Roll out using flour or cornmeal.
Here are some tips for cooking your pizza. Use within four to five hours of thawing (ready to go the night you pick up share or store in freezer for later use). Coat a smooth surface with flour and cornmeal (just flour is ok) so that the dough does not stick to the surface. Form dough into ball and flatten with heels of palms. Stretch dough with hands or use a rolling pin to form shape of baking pan (I use a cookie sheet so I form it into a square). Once dough is slightly stretched on surface you can stretch dough in the air with hands by making two fists held together with dough on top. Move each hand up, down and out turning the dough clockwise. Each dough can be stretched to a 16" round, for thicker crust make smaller. If you like light fluffy crust I put my baking sheet on the top of my oven while preheating and let rise. Otherwise set aside in neutral area till oven is ready at 425F. Cook 12-14 minutes until crust is golden brown and cheese bubbles.
To accompany the pizza dough is Pete's Greens Pizza Sauce. It's made with our own organic tomatoes, onions, garlic, olive oil, salt, sugar, oregano, thyme, basil, & black pepper. It's also coming to you frozen for easy delivery. You can defrost and put on your pizza right away or freeze it for later use. You can of course use this on pasta too.
Eggs are coming for half the share members this week and the other half next week. Egg share members are all receiving their weekly eggs.
Cheese Share members receive a piece of Conundrum from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. This was something of an experiment for Jasper Hill. They took their award-winning Harbison cheese (voted best cheese in North America last month!) and washed it in a salt brine solution. Typically Harbison is wrapped in bark. This is a little different and a rare opportunity! I'll admit - I haven't tried it but it comes highly recommended from our Jasper Hill friends!