Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 14, 2018

Welcome!

Welcome to the Spring CSA! We're excited to have you join us! I'm Taylar, the CSA Manager at Pete's Greens. You'll hear from me at least twice each week - on Fridays when I send out a "Sneak Peek" of your upcoming CSA share and then again on Tuesdays when I send out this email. This email will tell you what's coming this week plus some recipe ideas, storage tips, and info about our farm and the food in your shares.
For members returning from the Fall/ Winter season, thanks for bearing with us through last week's delivery. Weather and truck issues made for a wild CSA week!
By now, you should have received an email confirmation with all the details about how and when to pick up your weekly goodies! Please read below for a reminder about how to pick up at your site. If you ever have any questions, or if you have any issues at your site, please contact me at goodeats@petesgreens.com. Email is typically the best and fastest way to reach me. Notes left at your site won't make it back to me in time, or if at all, so best to email about any issues.
Thanks, and welcome to another season of eating locally and supporting organic farming with Pete's Greens!
~ Taylar
Picking up your CSA Share
Everyday Standard share members: take a YELLOW bag!
Everyday Large members: take an ORANGE bag!
Fancy and Localvore members: take a PURPLE bag!
Localvore and pantry share members should take 3 - 4 "out of bag" pantry items. Check the checklist and the coolers.
Bread, egg, and cheese share members will look for their items at their site and in coolers. Items are individually labeled.
Check the weekly names checklist for instructions as to what to pick up. Find your name, then follow the line across and take what is listed for you! Then, check off your name. We use this at the end of the day to solve any mysteries.
If splitting a share, please coordinate so you don't take duplicates!
A sample of the weekly checklist you'll find at your site. Names on the left, bags in the middle, pantry and add-ons to the right. NOTE: This is not for this season!
Large shares take orange (left), Standard take yellow (top right), Fancy/ Localvore take purple (bottom right)
Around the Farm
Welcome to our spring share! Things are starting to ramp up on the farm with tomato grafting in full swing, all the onions are being seeded, and overwintered greenhouse crops are starting to grow in earnest. I'm so appreciative of the longer days and more sun in the middle of February. Crop planning is nearly finished. We have some wonderful new fields we'll be using this year that are close to the home farm and are coming off 2 years of really nice cover crops. They should grow great veggies. Check out the tomato grafting video that Taylar made this morning.
~Pete
Here's a sneak peek - a still of Pete grafting tomatoes in our "head house". He'll do this about 2,000 times!
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Spinach, Parsley, Garlic, Mixed Baby Beets, Daikon Radish, Yellow Onions, Rainbow Carrots, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Tomatoes

Everyday Standard

Spinach, Parsley, Garlic, Parsnips, Red Beets, Yellow Onions, Rainbow Carrots, Peter Wilcox Potatoes
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Cauliflower

Fancy

Spinach, Garlic, Shallots, Mixed Baby Beets, Red Cabbage, Goldball Turnips, Rainbow Carrots, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Tomatoes

Bread Share

Red Hen Baking Co.
Polenta Bread

Pete's Pantry

Red Hen Baking Co. Bread, Lazy Lady Farm cheese, Eggs, and Pete's Greens Pesto

Cheese Share

Lazy Lady Farm
Lady in Blue
Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Spinach: This week's greens is a big bag of greenhouse spinach. Enjoy spinach raw or cooked. The greens are pre-washed and ready to eat. Unopened, this bag will last for at least a week or 10 days. Opened, it will start to deteriorate after a few days.
Peter Wilcox Potatoes - Peter Wilcox potatoes are in your share this week! Wilcox potatoes are beautiful purple potatoes. They are nicely textured, firm but not waxy, and wonderful whether roasted, boiled, or sliced into wedges or fried. They have a full earthy flavor that hints of hazelnuts. For best visual and nutritional effects, leave the skin on while cooking.
Goldball Turnips: Goldballs are a yellow turnip with a taste similar to rutabaga. Try pickling them or mash with butter, or cube and use in soups and stews. Keep turnips loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. They will last for several days, and even weeks. Peel before eating.
Daikon Radish: The long white vegetable in Everyday Large bags is the daikon radish or Chinese radish. Raw daikon is great sliced thinly in soups and stir-fries, or grated in slaws and salads. These radishes will keep well wrapped loosely in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
BeetsEveryday Large and Fancy shares are receiving a bag of our scrubbed clean baby beets! These are a mix of gold and red beets. They're ready for roasting or boiling, with no need for scrubbing or peeling. They will last for about 10 - 14 days. Everyday Standard shares are receiving red beets. Beets are delicious when roasted, boiled, or grated raw into a salad or slaw. Store in your crisper drawer.
Shallots are a member of the alium family being similar to both garlic and onions. They grow in cloves similar to garlic and have a sweet, mild flavor like a sweet or Spanish onion. They are well known for their ability to be caramelized or cooked down to where the sugars are reduced or concentrated. When eaten raw, they are much sweeter and milder than even sweet onions. You can slice them thin and saute them in recipes that benefit from a sweet, mild onion flavor. When minced, they are fantastic in homemade vinaigrette and pan sauces. Store them in a cool, dark place.
Using Your Frozen Veggies: Don't forget to take your frozen veggise! They will be in a cooler - "out of the bag"! I have been using our frozen veggies for a couple years now and I love having access to great organically grown local vegetables in winter. I live alone and often I do not need a whole bag of vegetables. For a quick and easy approach to using frozen veggies, take a bag of frozen veg out of the freezer, grab a serrated bread knife, and saw off a hunk of frozen veg and toss it into a waiting pot of boiling water for a quick warm up. Tie up your bag and pop that back into the freezer. I use a lot of our frozen vegetables in the same way - corn, broccoli, red peppers etc. I throw sawed off hunks in pasta sauces, saute pans, etc. It may be a bit of a crude method, but it's a time saver and a great option if you don't need a whole bag. You can also plan ahead and let them thaw out before using! You may need to give them a good squeeze or two to get some of the moisture out. The tomatoes are easy to use without thawing if you throw them directly into a pot.

Featured Recipes

Beet, Potato, and Walnut Salad
Add some bread and cheese to this salad and you've got a great meal!
1 1/2 pounds medium beets, scrubbed
1 1/2 pounds potatoes, chopped
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and ground pepper
1/2 cup roughly chopped walnuts (optional)
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh chives
1 to 2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
Preheat oven to 450 degrees, with racks in top and middle. Place beets on a large piece of foil on a baking sheet. Fold foil around beets and crimp ends to form a packet. Cook beets on sheet on middle rack, 30 minutes.
On a rimmed baking sheet, toss potatoes with oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, on sheet. After beets have cooked 30 minutes, place potatoes on top rack. Cook 15 minutes. Flip potatoes and sprinkle with walnuts (if using). Cook until walnuts are toasted, potatoes are golden, and beets are tender when pierced with a knife, 5 to 10 minutes.
Remove beets from foil and let cool. Transfer potatoes and walnuts to a large bowl. Rub beets with a paper towel to remove skin and cut each into 4 to 6 wedges, depending on size. Toss beets with potatoes, walnuts, and chives and season to taste with vinegar.
Turnip Hash
I testify to the deliciousness of this recipe! With a pile of turnips collecting in my fridge, I wondered what to do with them on Saturday evening. I decided to try this recipe from our archives. It was simple and oh so heavenly! If you have a picky eater or non-turnip lover in the family, try this recipe then ask them to reconsider! This recipe is a basic one that can be used with turnips, rutabagas or potatoes. The stock adds flavor while cooking and softening the starch. Feel free to add any kind of breakfast meat or tempeh, Anaheim peppers, greens or other veggies for a turnip hash "surprise". I ate this as part of my dinner Saturday night then again Sunday morning for a protein-rich breakfast along with eggs, tempeh, and my sauteed CSA frozen spinach.
6 Tbs olive oil
1 onion, diced small
2 c turnips, diced small
2 c hot chicken or veggie stock
2 Tbs butter
1/2 c Parmesan or another hard Italian cheese (optional)
1/2 c parsley, rough chop
Salt and pepper, to taste
Warm the chicken stock in a sauce pan over medium-low heat. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet and turn the heat to medium. Toss in the onion and cook until translucent. Add the turnips and cook for 2 minutes. Ladle in some of the hot chicken stock and cook until absorbed. Continue until all of the stock has been added, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the butter and grated cheese off the heat. Garnish with parsley.
Caramelized Shallots
What to do with all the shallots besides tossing them into a stir fry? Make these caramelized shallots! This recipe, from the Smitten Kitchen, is a great way to maximize the sweetness of the shallots.
6 tbs unsalted butter
2 pounds fresh shallots, peeled, with roots intact
3 tbs sugar
3 tbs good red wine vinegar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 tbs chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Melt the butter in a 12" oven-proof saute pan, add the shallots and sugar, and toss to coat. Cook over medium heat for 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the shallots start to brown. Add the vinegar, salt and pepper and toss well. 
Place the saute pan in the oven and roast for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on the size of the shallots, until they are tender. Season, to taste, sprinkle with parsley, and serve hot.
Roasted Carrots & Parsnips with Shallot & Herb Butter
5 large carrots (about 1 lb.), peeled
4 large parsnips (about 1 lb.), peeled
3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1-1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
2 Tbs. minced shallot
2 Tbs. finely chopped fresh chives
1-1/2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
1-1/2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme
1 clove garlic, minced
Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F.
Cut the carrots and parsnips into 2 x1/4-inch matchsticks. Put them in a large bowl; toss with the oil. Sprinkle with the salt and pepper and toss again. Transfer the vegetables to a 10x15-inch Pyrex dish and roast, stirring every 15 min., until the vegetables are nicely browned, 40 to 45 min.
Meanwhile, combine the butter, shallot, chives, rosemary, thyme, and garlic in a small bowl and stir well. Add the butter to the roasted vegetables and toss to coat. Serve immediately.
Za'atar Roasted Carrots
I made these for dinner last night - a delightful dish to finally utilize za'atar, a Middle Eastern spice that is typically a blend of thyme, sumac, and sesame seeds. Simple, but tastes very complex! The tahini adds a delicious hint of nuttiness. From The Sprouted Kitchen Bowl + Spoon cookbook.
1.5 lbs carrots, cleaned
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp freshly squeezed orange juice, and zest (note: I used lemon juice)
2 tsp za'atar
2-3 Tbsp tahini
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/3 c. crumbled feta (optional)
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1/4 c. chopped parsley
Pre-heat oven to 400F.
Trim the carrots. Cut them in half lengthwise and if they're large, crosswise on a diagonal as well. Mix together the olive oil, citrus, za'atar, and some sea salt. Toss the carrots in the spice mixture and spread onto a rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 22 - 25 mins until the edges begin to brown. Mix together the tahini and lemon juice. Drizzle the carrots with the tahini mixture and sprinkle with the feta, sesame seeds, parsley, and a pinch of freshly ground pepper.
Roasted Beet and Onion Salad
If you are one of those folks who have never developed a love for beets, try roasting them. Roasting sweetens them and deepens their earthy flavor. Roasted beets keep well in the fridge for 4-5 days and are great tossed onto daily green salads. This recipe brings together roasted beets and roasted onions and tops them with dill. The original recipe is adapted from one by Clifford Wright. You could roast the onions and beets together but please watch the onions closely, they will be bitter if they blacken too much. The beets will take longer to roast.
2 medium size onions, sliced across the grain in 1/4 " rings
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 lb beets, roasted, peeled and sliced (roast all of your beets and save remainder for other salads)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
2 to 3 tablespoons finely chopped dill
1 ounce toasted almonds, chopped (2 tablespoons chopped)
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place beets in a glass baking dish and add 1/4 inch of water and cover tightly and place in oven. Large beets over 8 oz will take 50-60 means to roast. Roast til they are easily pierced with a fork. Toss the sliced onions with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and salt to taste, and place on a lightly oiled baking sheet. Toward the second half of the roasting of the beets, place the onions in the oven and roast 15 minutes, turning the onions over halfway through. They should be nicely browned and just beginning to blacken around the edges, but not charred. Remove from the heat.
Remove beets carefully when roasted, and the skins will slip from them easily (you can run them under cool water briefly if too hot to handle when removing skins, they will still retain some warmth. Slice beets into discs.
Arrange the sliced beets on a platter. Arrange the onions over the beets. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Whisk together the vinegars, salt and pepper to taste and the remaining olive oil. Drizzle over the onions and beets. Sprinkle on the dill and the almonds, and serve.

Pantry Lore

This week's pantry share bread is a Potato Bread from Red Hen Baking Co. I love working with our producers because I get descriptions like this: "25 % of the bread is organic yukon golds from Footebrook Farm (in Johnson), the rest is organic white flour from Le Moulin des Cedres, with a dash of organic Whole Wheat from Ben Gleason's farm in Bridport. 100% Organic, sourdough, delicious." Store bread cut side down; the paper is merely a healthy protective coat with no functionality to preserving the bread! Use within a couple of days.
Bread-only members are receiving a Polenta Bread from Red Hen Baking Co. This bread is made with Quebec-grown unbleached organic wheat flour, organic Vermont honey, and Geechee Boy polenta (milled from heirloom corn).
Cheese this week comes from Lazy Lady Farm in Westfield. I finally got to meet the incomparable Laini Fondillier last weekend at the Montpelier Farmer's Market. Laini is the "lazy lady" behind this off-the-grid, organic goat farm, quietly making delicious artisan cheese for decades -- not so lazy, really! You'll receive one of three types: Oh My Hearts, Blue Moon, or Lady in Blue. Oh my Hearts are a small Brie stle, mild and best eaten at room temperature. The Lady in Blue is a delicate raw milk blue cheese that is ripened 2 months and made with organic jersey milk. The Blue Moon is a Camembert style blue cheese and made with neighboring Butterworks Farm grass fed milk. Ripened 4 weeks. Shelf life for Oh My Hearts have a 3 week shelf life but could dry out if not kept wrapped up. The Lady in Blue and Blue Moon will have a shorter shelf life because it is a cut and wrap situation.
Eggs this week come from Axel's Eggs in Greensboro or Besteyfield Farm in Hinesburg.
Rounding out the pantry share this week is Sweet Basil Pesto from our own farm! We make this pesto in our commercial kitchen using our organically grown basil. It's frozen and can go right back into the freezer or keep out and use within a week. Perfect for tossing with pasta or as a dressing for potatoes. I also enjoy slathering it on sandwiches -- or on a slice of warm bread with a piece of cheese. Enjoy!

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - February 7, 2018

THIS IS A MEAT WEEK!
Last week of the Fall/ Winter Meat Share.
LAST WEEK OF THE FALL SHARE! Your deliveries end this week... sign up to keep the veggies coming!
Storm News
A Winter Storm Warning has been issued for much of Vermont tomorrow. Our delivery trucks are still making their way. If either of our drivers becomes behind schedule tomorrow, we will be in touch. Please stay tuned to your email for any notices from us!

Announcements

After this week, there are NO MORE delivery left in the Fall/ Winter Season! Please sign up today - the Spring Share starts February 14! Please contact me to find out if you have any credit remaining on your account from skipped deliveries.
We are now collecting your CSA bags! Please bring your CLEAN bags back to your CSA pickup site and they will be passed along to the Montpelier Food Shelf!
We also collect cardboard egg cartons. Please bring clean egg cartons back to your site and they will be returned to our egg producers. Thanks for helping to reduce packaging!
Keep your eye out for an end-of-season survey, coming soon! We appreciate and value your feedback and look forward to hearing from you about this fall's season, especially how our new share options worked for you.
Speaking of appreciation, many, many thanks go out to Aaron and Justine, our faithful site hosts at Ward St. This has been a long-running site for us but unfortunately deliveries will discontinue here after this week. Thanks, Aaron and Justine!
~ Taylar
Have you signed up for your SPRING CSA?
Don't miss a week of Pete's Good Eats! We're signing up for our Spring CSA, starting February 14!
If you pick-up in Burlington's New North End, your NEW site is the Miller Community & Recreation Center!
If you pick-up in Burlington's Old North End, your NEW site is Scout & Co ONE, on North Ave. Coffee, ice cream, and veggies!
Going out of town?
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Shoots, Garlic, Parsnip, Celeriac, Carrots, Gilfeather Turnips, Yellow Onions, Adirondack Red Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach

Everyday Standard

Shoots, Garlic, Rutabaga, Goldball Turnips, Yellow Onions, Adirondack Red Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach

Fancy

Shoots, Parsley, Garlic, Kohlrabi, Parsnip, Black Radish, Daikon Radish, Leeks or Red Cippolini Onions, Gold Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Spinach

Pete's Pantry

Pete's Greens Pizza Dough and Pizza Sauce
Cellars at Jasper Hill Bayley Hazen Blue Cheese
Find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Turnips: The Everyday shares are each getting a different turnip variety. Goldballs (seen in the picture below on the bottom) are a yellow turnip with a taste similar to rutabaga. Try pickling them or mash with butter, or cube and use in soups and stews. Gilfeathers (shown in the photo on the top row) were first developed in Vermont by John Gilfeather. These have a white flesh and make a beautiful, sweet flavored puree. Though celeriac is probably a better substitute for a celery taste, some folks value celeriac too much to use in a stock or in any recipe where the flavor may get lost, but you can try subbing in turnips. Keep turnips loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. They will last for several days, and even weeks. Peel before eating.
Daikon Radish: The long white vegetable in your bags is the daikon radish or Chinese radish. Raw daikon is great sliced thinly in soups and stir-fries, or grated in slaws and salads. These radishes will keep well wrapped loosely in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
KohlrabiKohlrabi packs the nutritional punch of the other members of the cruciferous veggies (broccoli, kale, cabbage), and when you cut it up into strips and cook it, it is completely unintimidating (it looks like apple slices or plain potato strips). So this makes it a veggie that is easy for even picky kids to try and often like. It adds crunch and body to a salad, it's great tossed on grill in a drizzle of olive oil in roasting basket or tin foil, it's great as a side dressed up in a myriad of ethnic flavor profiles, and it's terrific in many dishes calling for a veggie melange. And to top it off, it stores a long time, so you can eat everything else in the fridge first and then 3 weeks later discover you still have perfect kohlrabi. To use it, cut off that tough colorful exterior. Then cut up the white part into whatever shape you like. Eat it raw or cook it up.

Featured Recipes

Red Cabbage, Carrot, Daikon, Shoots Salad w/ Miso dressing
I can't seem to get enough of this salad lately and this share is perfect for it; red cabbage is best but you can use whatever you have on hand. I especially love it because I grate the vegetables in volume, and leave them in containers in the fridge. Then just before dinner I throw a handful of shoots in the bowl with handfuls of grated carrot, cabbage and some daikon, dress the salad and I am done. So easy.
Shoots Mix
Grated Carrots
Grated Red Cabbage
Grated Daikon Radish
Grated Kohlrabi
Honey Miso Dressing
Honestly, if you have the ingredients on hand, you might as well make a double or triple batch. It's really yummy.
2.5 TB miso
w TB honey
2 tsp dijon
3 TB water
1 TB tamari
1 TB cider vinegar
1 tsp fresh ginger, grated or minced fine
1/2 tsp sunflower or sesame oil
1 clove garlic minced
Mix all ingredients together. Best to let sit 15 minutes to let flavors meld.

Carrot and Daikon Salad
In this recipe from Shizuo’s Tsuji’s Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, carrot and daikon are paired in a light, refreshing dish with a sweet and sour dressing called amazu. Salting and kneading the vegetables causes them to release their liquid. The dressing is then combined with the vegetables and the dish is refrigerated for at least 30 minutes (it’s even more flavorful if left overnight). Traditionally, the salad is served in small plates. 
1 large carrot, cut into 2 inch x ½ inch matshsticks
1 lb daikon radish, cut into 1 inch x ½ inch matchsticks
1 tsp salt
¼ c. unseasoned rice vinegar
1.5 TB sugar
½ cup water
In a large bowl combine the carrot and daikon radish matchsticks. Add the salt and toss lightly. After several minutes, mix and lightly knead the vegetables with your hands. Working over a colander set in a bowl, gather up the vegetables in your hands and squeeze out the liquid. Rinse and dry the bowl. Place the vegetables in it.
In a glass bowl, mix the vinegar, sugar, and water. Heat in a microwave for 1 minute or until the sugar dissolves. Alternatively, heat the mixture in a small saucepan. Cool to room temperature.
Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the vinegar mixture onto the vegetables. Mix with your hand and then squeeze the liquid from the vegetables. Discard the liquid.
Add the remaining dressing to the vegetables. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or for up to two days.
Carrot Salad with Honey-Lemon Dressing
2 tablespoons walnut oil or canola oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey
1 small shallot, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups shredded carrots, (about 4 medium)
1 cup peeled and shredded celery root
1/4 cup golden raisins
1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
Whisk oil, lemon juice, honey, shallot, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add carrots, celery root, raisins and walnuts; toss to combine.

Celeriac Soup
There are many variations one could use to turn out a lovely soup using the ingredients in this share. The recipe below is just a suggestion. Soup is a great place to experiment. If you don't have an ingredient omit it and/or substitute something similar. Try adding other herbs if you'd like. A bit of sage or thyme would be nice in this soup.
2 TB Oil (or butter or combo)
1 medium onion, or 2 leeks, or 2 shallots (peeled and sliced thinly)
2 garlic cloves (peeled and sliced thinly, or minced)
1.5 lb celeriac (peeled and chopped into chunks)
2 stalks celery (peeled and chopped, use peeler to remove tough outer strings)
2 potatoes, scrubbed and chopped
2 carrots, peeled or scrubbed and chopped
1 quart of chicken stock (or vegetable broth)
1 Bay leaf
salt & pepper to taste
1 cup water (as needed)
Heat butter/oil in Dutch oven or soup pot. Add onions, cover and simmer until tender. For more flavor, remove cover and simmer until onions have browned slightly. Add garlic and celery and simmer 2-3 minutes more. Add the other vegetables and let cook for about 5 mins. Add the chicken stock and bay leaf and water if needed, enough to cover the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce and simmer covered for about 20 mins, until the vegetables are tender. Puree in batches in a blender or use a hand mixer to puree the vegetables. If you think your soup is too thick, add some water or more stock. Taste and adjust seasoning to your liking.

Savory-Sweet Rutabaga Pudding
From the website www.angelicorganics.com: Somewhere between a fluffy ricotta dessert and mashed potatoes, this delectable rutabaga pudding has all the qualities needed to become a standard in your culinary repertoire. This dish will surprise you in many ways: in taste, in texture, in ease of preparing, and in the compliments it will bring to your table. It pairs exceptionally well with lamb. Friend of the Farm (adapted from Nika Hazelton’s Way with Vegetables). Serves 6 to 8.
1 large rutabaga (about 2 pounds), peeled, cut into 2-inch dice
1 1/2 teaspoons salt, divided
butter for greasing the baking dish
2 eggs plus 1 egg yolk, beaten
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup dried bread crumbs
1 tablespoon maple syrup
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
1/3 cup raisins, plumped in hot water for 15 minutes and drained (optional)
freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons butter
Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add the rutabaga and 1 teaspoon salt, partially cover, and cook until the rutabaga is very soft, 30 to 45 minutes. (You will need to reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking water.)
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Coat a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Beat the eggs and egg yolk in a medium bowl. Stir in the cream, bread crumbs, maple syrup, and nutmeg.
Drain the rutabaga, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Mash the rutabaga thoroughly with a potato masher or run it through a food mill. If the mixture seems dry, add a little of the reserved rutabaga water as you mash. Add the egg mixture, raisins, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and a few grindings of pepper; stir to combine.
Transfer the rutabaga pudding to the prepared baking dish. Smooth the top and dot with butter. Bake until lightly golden on top, about 45 minutes. Serve hot.
Chicken, Turnip & Leek Potpie
This recipe is adapted from Andrea Chessman's Serving Up the Harvest cookbook. I stuck pretty true to the recipe except that I assumed you were starting with cooked chicken (leftovers from last week?) and had broth on hand. You can sub in other vegetables of course - a carrot, rutabaga, potato, etc or make vegetarian style omitting the chicken and using veggie stock.
around 3 cups of cooked chicken (or turkey)
3 cups chicken broth
1 medium turnip, peeled and diced
6 TB extra virgin olive oil
6 medium leeks, white and tender green parts only, sliced
6 Tbs unbleached all-purpose flour
2 cloves garlic, crushed and minced
1 Tbs chopped fresh dill
salt and pepper
Biscuit topping
3 c unbleached flour
2 Tbs baking powder
1.5 tsp salt
2/3 c butter
1 c buttermilk
Cover the turnip with salted water and boil under tender, 5 -8 minutes. Drain.
Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Saute the leeks in the oil until tender, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle in the flour and stir until all the flour is absorbed into the oil. Whisk in the 3 cups of broth and stir until thickened and smooth. Stir in the chicken, turnip, garlic and dill. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil. Keep hot (but not boiling) while you prepare the biscuits.
Preheat the oven to 450F and set out a 13 x 9 ungreased baking pan. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and butter in a food processor and pulse 5-7 times until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Pea sized butter chunks are fine. Pour in the buttermilk and pulse until just combined. Dump out onto a floured board and knead just a few times to pull dough and all dry pieces together. Pat dough out to around 1/2". Shape into a rectangle and cut 12 squares; or cut 3" rounds, gathering up scraps and pressing out and cutting again to get 12 rounds.
Pour chicken mixture into a baking pan. Place the biscuits on top. Bake for about 18 minutes until biscuits are golden and chicken mixture bubbly. Let stand a few minutes before serving.

Gilfeather turnips on the top, goldballs on the bottom

Meat Share

The last meat share of the Fall/ Winter season includes a Pete's Pastured Chicken, kept whole for roasting, grilling, or stock-making. It's been a long while since we've put these lamb sausages in, but down the road from us in Albany is Bonnieview Farm. You may know Bonnieview from its sheep's milk cheese, but they also process lambs into yummy sausages. These lambs were raised on a nearby hillside on this 200+ year old farm. Don't hesitate to use these over pasta, sliced on a pizza, or grill and eat on a bun. Or, try serving with a Mediterranean dish - maybe a light orzo or Greek salad on the side, or with couscous.
Rounding out your share are two pork products, a package of sirloin cutlets from VT99 and a package of Italian sausage from Maple Wind Farm.
Here's an idea for cooking your cutlets, adapted from Martha Stewart:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss panko with oil. Bake, tossing once, until golden brown, 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees.
Meanwhile, one at a time, place chops between 2 large pieces of plastic wrap. Using a meat mallet or the bottom of a small heavy pan, pound to make 1/4-inch-thick cutlets.
Dividing evenly, coat pork with mustard; season with salt and pepper. One at a time, dip cutlets into panko, pressing firmly to adhere.
Place a rack on a rimmed baking sheet; place pork on rack, and bake, without turning, until opaque throughout, 10 to 15 minutes.

Pantry Lore

It's a pizza party! We make the Pizza Dough at the farm and then freeze it for delivery. Our pizza dough is made with Meunerie Milanaise's organic unbleached VT white flour, olive oil, Maine sea salt and yeast. Use within four to five hours of thawing (ready to go the night you pick up share or store in freezer for later use). Coat a smooth surface with flour and cornmeal (just flour ok or just cornmeal ok) so that the dough does not stick to the surface. Form dough into ball and flatten with heels of palms. Stretch dough with hands or use a rolling pin to form shape of baking pan (I use a cookie sheet so I form it into a square). Once dough is slightly stretched on surface you can stretch dough in the air with hands by making two fists held together with dough on top. Move each hand up, down and out turning the dough clockwise. Each dough can be stretched to a 16" round, for thicker crust make smaller. If you like light fluffy crust I put my baking sheet on the top of my oven while preheating and let rise. Otherwise set aside in neutral area till oven is ready at 425F. Cook 12-14 minutes until crust is golden brown and cheese bubbles.
We also made Pizza Sauce to go along with the share. Kaitlyn made the pizza sauce in our kitchen using our organic tomatoes, onions, olive oil, garlic, oregano, basil, fennel seed, salt, & black pepper. It's pretty yummy and is coming frozen; freeze or use within a week. Use on your pizza or of course on pasta too. Some folks prefer a thicker sauce; if so, heat it up in a saucepan until it reduces to the desired consistancy.
To top your pizza, we have also included Bayley Hazen Blue Cheese from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. This cheese receives regular rave reviews like this one from Cynthia Zarin who described Bayley Hazen Blue for the New Yorker Magazine this way “It was tangy, sweet, creamy, velvet on the tongue, the most delicious blue cheese I’d ever tasted." Bayley Hazen Blue is named after a road running through the Northeast Kingdom. The road was built and named after two Revolutionary War generals Bayley and Hazen, who were stationed along the Canadian Front. Jasper Hill summarizes this delicious cheese as follows. "The paste of a Bayley Hazen is drier than most blues and the penicillium roqueforti takes a back seat to an array of flavors that hint at nuts and grasses and in the odd batch, licorice. Though drier and crumblier than most blues, its texture reminds one of chocolate and butter." Enjoy, it's awesome.
I enjoy chopped fresh garlic sprinkled on my pizza as soon as I pull it out of the oven. Try using your frozen spinach, too, it makes a great topping!