Tuesday, December 11, 2018


In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Red Kuri Squash, Greens, Parsley, Chard or Red Russian Kale, Celeriac, Fennel, Radicchio, Carrots, Red Onions

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Squash, Greens, Parsley, Kale, Tatsoi or Sorrel, Red Onions, Celeriac

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Spinach, Lettuce, Fennel, Radicchio, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Honest to Goodness Apple Cider Vinegar: From the homestead of Jo Liddell and Bob Machim, Gingerbrook Farm, of South Washington, VT. This is the real macoy cider vinegar, a health tonic and almost good enough to drink straight! It starts with unpasteurized apple cider that Bob seeds with a "mother" culture of yeast that ferments the cider. The difference between apple cider gone bad due to the infiltration of natural airborne yeasts and a good artisanal cider vinegar is in controlling the process. The mother culture makes a big difference, as does the fresh cider used for the vinegar, and the aging process. In time, you may find a slippery gelatinous mass forms in your cider vinegar. Fear not! This is just more "mother" forming in your jar. Just remove it from jar and continue to use your vinegar.
Pearled Barley: The organic pearled barley was grown in Quebec and milled at Golden Crops owned by Michel Gaudreau. Pearled barley has been de-hulled, with some or all of the bran removed. It makes a great substitute in recipes calling for brown rice, is wonderful cooked, cooled and used in cold salads, and adds a nice texture to soups and stews. It also cooks down into a really nice risotto, without all of the attention and stirring required with Arborio rice. One cup of dry barley makes about 3 to 3 1/2 cups cooked. If you soak the grains for 6+ hours in cold water before use, you can reduce your cooking time by at least half. Without soaking, you'll want to let them simmer in water for a good hour. You can also cook barley like pasta, using lots of water (4-5 cups of water to 1 cup barley), then drain what's left over.
Butterworks Farm Yogurt: Pastured, organic Jersey cows make this creamy yogurt so delicious! Made by the Lazor family in Westfield, VT, we have a few varieties - please, only take 1 quart. This is great yogurt.

Around the Farm

It's 5:15! The day got away from me. I've alluded to some changes coming to the CSA and while I'm not ready to fully release them yet, I will share with you that I was in a meeting this afternoon plotting out Phase 1 of our CSA redesign - eek! We're working on some changes that I'm really excited about, that will allow members lots more control over their share deliveries and, I hope, make payment easier. This is coming in time for the Spring CSA season, which is rapidly approaching.
Seed catalogs keep arriving and Melissa and I have been going through them with an eye on what might be fun to try for CSA next year. We grow about 200 different veggie varieties and are always looking at what we should grow or not grow each year - what's popular, what's not, what's challenging, what's economical, and so on. It's always different each season depending on who our CSA members are and what the hot food trends are each season!
Just a reminder that we take off one week each year, and this year it's the week of Dec 24, so no CSA deliveries Dec 26/27.
The last week of the Lean & Green Share is next week, Dec 19. If you're a Lean & Green member and you haven't signed up for another share, your last delivery is next week! Contact me to keep your shares going.
~ Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A hearty, colorful blend of red lettuce, red and green spinach, claytonia, mizuna, cress, and baby kale. We recommend you wash greens before eating and use within a week.
Sorrel: Sorrel is a green leaf vegetable native to Europe. It is also called common sorrel or spinach dock. In appearance sorrel greatly resembles spinach and in taste sorrel can range from comparable to the kiwifruit (or lemons or a combo) to a more acidic tasting older leaf (due to the presence of oxalic acid which increases as the leaves gets older). Young sorrel may be harvested to use in salads, soups or stews. Young sorrel leaves are also excellent when lightly cooked, similar to the taste of cooked chard or spinach. Older sorrel is best for soups and stews where it adds tang and flavor to the dish. 
Fennel: Crunchy and slightly sweet with the flavor of anise, fennel is delicious served raw but is just as often served cooked on its own or in other dishes. This fennel is mostly small, so it may not look like much, but it brings the flavor anyway! This is actually our last distribution of fennel for the year. Until next season, fennel! Though most often associated with Italian cooking, it has an uncanny ability to blend with other flavors adding a light and fresh note. It is delightful in soups and stews and sauces and is particularly at home with tomato sauce dishes. Fennel is composed of a white or pale green bulb from which closely superimposed stalks are arranged. To prepare, cut off the hard bottom and slice vertically or into quarters. Or cut the bulb in half lengthwise, cut out the core, and cut into strips. Add it raw to salads or try some thinly sliced fennel on your sandwich. Top thinly sliced fennel with plain yogurt and mint leaves. Or braise, roast or saute it. It is done when tender enough to pierce easily with a skewer.
Celeriac: An under-appreciated root veggie that is so versatile! It's great for roasting, mashing, soup making, and more! Celeriac is a great potato substitute or try mixing it in with your potatoes. Last night I made tacos and cubed it up in small chunks, then roasted with cumin, chili powder, garlic, salt & pepper, and olive oil. It made a great filling along with some refried Jacob's Cattle beans, roasted squash, sautéed onions, and sharp cheddar cheese. Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.
Radicchio: A member of the Chicories family along with endive and escarole, radicchio resembles a small red lettuce. Like all the members of this family, the leaves have some bitterness. You can chop radicchio and add it to your salad for some color and extra flavor. It is also quite good brushed with olive oil before tossing on the grill. Try adding some to risotto. Keep unwashed radicchio in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer for up to a week.

Recipes

Celeriac and Apple Salad with Tarragon and Roasted Walnuts

Serves 4 to 6
4 cups water
juice of 1 lemon (about 3 tablespoons)
2 tart apples, peeled, cored, sliced into 1/4-inch strips
1 large celeriac, peeled, cut into matchstick-sized strips
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 1/2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon heavy cream
2 teaspoons prepared Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
salt

1. Combine water and lemon juice in a large bowl. Add the apple slices and celeriac strips and let stand for 15 minutes (this acidified water will keep the celeriac and apple from turning brown).
2. Toast the walnuts in a dry skillet over high heat, stirring frequently, until they begin to darken in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. Let cool.
3. Drain the celeriac and apple mixture; return to the bowl, add the vinegar, and toss.
4. Combine the mayonnaise, cream, mustard, tarragon, pepper, and salt to taste in a small bowl. Pour the dressing over the celeriac and apple mixture; toss to coat. Add the walnuts and toss again. Chill for at least 1 hour before serving (2 or 3 hours is even better).
Fennel And Kale Pasta
Sweet fennel and greens work beautifully together.
1⁄2 c olive oil
1 onion, minced
1 medium fennel bulb fronds removed, halved and thinly sliced
salt and pepper
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 lb spaghetti
up to 3 lb kale or other cooking green washed and chopped
1 c grated parmesan
Heat oil in a large braising pan or skillet with a cover. Add onion; sauté over medium heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in fennel; sauté until golden, about 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat until fennel is tender, about 8 minutes longer. Stir in vinegar; simmer to blend flavors, 1 minute longer. Adjust seasonings.
Meanwhile, bring 4 quarts water to boil in large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt and the pasta; return to boil. Add kale; continue to cook until pasta is al dente, about 7 minutes.
Drain pasta and greens; toss with fennel mixture and cheese. Transfer portions to warm pasta bowls. Garnish with reserved minced fennel fronds. Serve immediately with more cheese passed separately.

Spicy Celeriac and Carrot Soup
1 tsp olive oil
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup roasted, peeled, seeded, and chopped Poblano chilies (canned)
1 celeriac, peeled and diced
1 pound carrots, peeled and diced
2 vegetable stock cubes made up with 7.5 cups boiling water
Fresh coriander, roughly chopped
Freshly ground black pepper 
Heat the oil in a large saucepan and cook the onion until softened. Add the garlic and red chilli and cook for a further minute. Combine the vegetables and add to the saucepan, allowing them to cook for a few minutes before adding the vegetable stock and half of the fresh coriander.
Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, partially cover with a lid and allow to simmer for 25 minutes.
Blend the soup in a processor until smooth. Return the soup to the saucepan, season to taste and warm through before serving, sprinkled with coriander.
Risotto con radicchio
Serves: 4‑6
1 head radicchio plus extra greens if desired
1/2 cup finely chopped white onion
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
5 Tbsp. unsalted butter
6‑7 cups vegetable broth
1 cup dry white wine (or red is great with the radicchio)
1/2 cup freshly grated Italian Parmesan

Wash and slice the radicchio thinly. And greens if using.
In a large non stick pan cook the onions in 3 Tbsp. butter and 1 Tbsp. olive oil until they're translucent being careful not to brown them. Add the radicchio and cook them for about 10 to 15 minutes or until they are reduced to less than half their original volume. Mixing often. Add the rice and mix well for 2 or 3 minutes so that the moisture from the radicchio is absorbed into the rice. Add the wine and continue mixing until it is absorbed.

Swiss Chard Gratin
This is not a low fat recipe, nor is it a quick one. But it was extremely well reviewed and uses a large quantity of greens which you have in your share this week. So if you are seeking to pack in the greens this week while also treating yourself to some decadence, this recipe is for you. Adapted from an October 2000 recipe in Gourmet. Serves 6.
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup fresh white bread crumbs
3 oz Gruyère cheese, grated (1 cup) (parm would work too)
1 garlic clove, halved lengthwise, germ removed if green, and garlic finely chopped
1 tablespoon finely chopped mixed fresh herbs (preferably chives, tarragon, and flat-leaf parsley)
1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 medium onion, finely chopped
3 lb Swiss chard, Beet Greens, Kohlrabi Greens, Sorrel (and if you are more adventurous - kale or Upland Cress) leaves and stems separated and cut into 1-inch pieces
(if using kale though, don't use stems, just leaves - stems too tough)
Melt 2 tablespoons butter and toss with bread crumbs, cheese, garlic, herbs, half of nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl.
Boil broth in a small saucepan until reduced by half. Add cream and keep warm.
Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a small heavy saucepan over moderate heat and stir in flour. Cook roux, whisking, 1 minute, then whisk in broth mixture and boil, whisking, 1 minute. Season sauce with salt and pepper.
Preheat oven to 400°F.
Cook onion in remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a wide 8-quart heavy pot over moderately low heat, stirring, until softened. Add chard stems, remaining nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste and cook, stirring, until vegetables are tender but not browned, about 8 minutes.
Increase heat to moderately low heat, stirring, until softened. Add greens stems, remaining nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste and cook, stirring, until vegetables are tender but not browned, about 8 minutes.
Increase heat to moderately high and add greens leaves by large handfuls, stirring, until all greens are wilted. Season with salt and pepper.
Transfer vegetables to a colander to drain well and press out liquid with back of a large spoon (be sure to press out as much liquid as possible!). Toss vegetables with cream sauce and transfer to a buttered 12-inch oval gratin or 2-quart shallow baking dish, spreading evenly.
Top vegetables with bread crumbs and bake in middle of oven until bubbling and topping is golden, about 20 minutes.

Sorrel Soup 
This is a very simple light soup that highlights the fresh, slightly lemony flavor of the sorrel. It's from the Sundays at Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen. Light, lemony and delicious.
2 c. well-packed, washed and stemmed sorrel leaves
1 medium onion, chopped
3 T. butter
1 T. unbleached white flour
3 c. vegetable stock
2 egg yolks
1 c. milk or half and half
salt and freshly ground black pepper
dash of Tabasco or other hot sauce (optional)
Finely chop the sorrel leaves. In a medium saucepan, sauté the onion in the butter until translucent. Stir in the flour. Mix in the sorrel and cook for a minute or so, just until it wilts. Add the vegetable stock. Bring the soup to a low simmer and cook for about 3 minutes. Beat the egg yolks and milk in a medium mixing bowl. Slowly add 2 c. of the hot soup while stirring constantly. Stir this soup-egg mixture into the soup pot. Reheat the soup gently but don’t let it boil. Add salt, pepper to taste and a dash of Tabasco, if you like.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.

Delivery Reminders!

This season is 17 deliveries over 18 weeks. Each year, we all take off 1 week in December to recharge. There will be NO DELIVERY the week of December 24.
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - December 5, 2018


Don't forget -- it's a Meat Share Week!

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Honeynut Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Shallots, Parsnips, Black Radishes, Upland Cress, Cilantro, Red Kale, Greens, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Red Cabbage, Cilantro, Lettuce Head, Garlic, Greens, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Brussels Sprouts

LEAN & GREEN (GREEN)

Greens, Lettuce, Upland Cress, Red Kale, Mixed Carrots, and Black Radishes

Meat Share

VT99 Ground Pork: Raised on our farm, with our veggies, fed whey from cheesemaking at Jasper Hill! Healthy, conscientiously raised pork! Try crumbling and sauteeing this pork, along with garlic and your favorite spices, for your pizza. Yum!
McKnight Farm Roast Beef: A special, and new, cut for us! Boneless beef roasts that Seth Gardner of McKnight Farm in East Montpelier had cut especially for us.
McKnight Farm Stew Meat: Perfect little beef chunks for stews and casseroles, from pastured cows.
Pete's Greens Chicken: We raised these chickens from chick to pullet to your plate. They were raised on our pasture with beautiful scenery and ample room to roam.

Pantry/ Localvore Items

Red Hen Bakery Pizza Crust: Longtime members of our CSA will remember receiving frozen pizza dough in the past. This week, I'm trying something new! I'm really excited to share with you a par-baked crust from Red Hen Baking Co. in Middlesex. This pizza crust is ready-to-use! Just top it and bake at 450 degrees for about 5 minutes, then turn your oven to broil for another minute or two until your cheese is golden and bubbly. If you're not able to use the crust within a couple of days, please freeze it! I'm very curious to know what you think about this option. I've been reading member comments on the dough for a few seasons now and I think this might be a good compromise!
Pete's Greens Pizza Sauce: To top your crust, we have our very own, farm-made pizza sauce, made with our organic, farmgrown tomatoes, plus a garlic and spices. I found that the 16 oz container of the sauce was the perfect amount of sauce for the 16 oz crust! It's frozen, so thaw before using. I like to heat it up in a small saucepan; that also helps cook off any of the excess liquid that comes from being frozen.
Jasper Hill Shredded Cheese: For your pizza... shredded cheese from the Cellars at Jasper Hill!

CHEESE SHARE

Mt. Mansfield Creamery: New cheese alert!! If we've ever included Mt. Mansfield Creamery cheese, it's been a long, long time! Made by Stan Biasini in Morrisville, this Chin Clip cheese is aged 8 months. Stan and his wife milk a small herd of Holstein and Swiss cows in Morristown, just a few miles from the creamery. It is a natural rinded cheese - 100% edible. Stan recommends enjoying Chin Clip with a glass of your favorite wine.

Pantry, cont.

Pantry Share members also pick up 1 dozen eggs! From Besteyfield Farm and Axel's Eggs.

Around the Farm

Greens greens greens! Amongst all this white stuff that keeps coming down, we have some beautiful, tender greens growing in our greenhouses. I stopped in this week while our crew was harvesting your greens. The colors and smells are truly invigorating! I hope your palates find these greens invigorating, too.
So how do we do it? We have radiant heating in our tunnels/ greenhouses that allow the roots to grow down, while the foliage grows up with natural light. On these dark, gloomy days, the greens really struggle. We have to be careful about when and how much we water the beds. We keep them covered during these darker days to keep in the heat. We really scale back our greens during this time of year because it is propane that heats the ground and we try to strike the balance of economy and efficiency. We grow the greens for our CSA members (you!), our Waterbury Farm Market, and in limited quantities for another wholesale customer. They are harvested by hand, very carefully, and washed with care in a big bulk tank (recycled from a dairy farm many moons ago). Soon we'll be starting up with our shoots - soil based and jam-packed with nutrients, we'll see shoots in the new year.
~ Taylar
Above, Enrique harvests the mizuna in your mesclun. Enrique is one of our winter-seasonal employees. In the summer he does roofing, in the winter he comes here!
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: A hearty, colorful blend of red lettuce, red and green spinach, claytonia, mizuna, cress, and baby kale. We recommend you wash greens before eating and use within a week.
Brussels Sprouts: Last year we had no Brussels sprouts, this year we have an abundance! I love them prepared simply - roasted with garlic and olive oil, but bacon eaters love them with bacon or bacon grease.
Squash: I can't believe it, but we are reaching the end of our squash harvest! This week is a little bit of a medley... Purple bags will receive honeynut squash, which look like baby butternuts, but more golden and with a sweeter flavor. It has an interesting history - you can read more in this Bon Appetit article here. This is the first year we grew this variety, so if is popular, let me know and we'll try to bring it back next year! We only have enough for this one distribution. The rest of the Standard shares are receiving the small green kabochas, honeynut, delicata, dumpling, or a traditional butternut - or some combination thereof!
Black Radishes: Of an ancient origin, black radishes are one of the oldest cultivated radishes. Nutritionally, they are excellent for Vitamin C, among other healthy nutrients and vitamins. Some say they help fight off infection and promote healthy digestive function. They are firmer, drier, and stronger than other radishes. You can eat raw or cooked; try slicing or grating over a salad or added into a slaw. You could also slice them thinly, then salt and drain and mix with sour cream as a spread for chewy rye bread. You can peel the outer layer or scrub clean and eat with the skin on.
Niles, our wash house manager, likes to make a root chip blend of thinly sliced black radishes, sweet potatoes, and red beets, laid flat and coated with olive oil, salt, and pepper, then baked at low heat. The healthy, homemade "potato chip"! 
Lettuce heads: Little red leaf lettuce heads! Greenhouse grown and harvested fresh. Tender, petite lettuce make for a fresh salad or sandwich topping.
Upland Cress: This upland cress has a deep pungency with a unique twist between arugula and horseradish, pledging its allegience to the mustard family. Cress is indeed rich in vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, and calcium. Try it on sandwiches or in salads, in soups, or with cooked meat, poultry, and fish.
Parsnips: Contrary to appearances, parsnips are not pale versions of carrots. In fact, they have a nutty-sweet taste and a tender-hearty texture that is entirely distinct. For centuries, parsnips were a more common staple than the potato—and deservedly so. Satisfying, versatile, and highly nutritious, these delicious roots make a terrific base to any meal. Young parsnips don’t need to be peeled. Simply scrub them under running water with a vegetable brush. Peel larger parsnips, and cut out the core if it seems woody. However you slice or chop parsnips, be sure to make all the pieces relatively the same size, ensuring an evenly cooked dish. Refrigerate unwashed parsnips in a loosely wrapped or perforated plastic bag for up to two weeks.

Recipes

Mashed Sweet Potatoes
This is Martha Stewart's recipe, the all-around crowd-pleaser. There will not be any leftovers.
2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch chunks
1/2 cup half-and-half
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons light-brown sugar (or maple sugar)
Coarse salt and ground pepper
Boil sweet potatoes until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain, and return to saucepan. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, bring half-and-half, butter, and brown sugar to a simmer, stirring to combine; remove from heat. Add to drained sweet potatoes, and mash just until smooth; season with salt and pepper.
Baked Kale Chips
1 bunch kale
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon sea salt or more to taste
Optional - add a splash of lemon juice too!
Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a non insulated cookie sheet with parchment paper. With a knife or kitchen shears carefully remove the leaves from the thick stems and tear into bite size pieces. Wash and thoroughly dry kale with a salad spinner or the old towel spin. Drizzle kale with olive oil, and rub with fingers to spread oil all over the surfaces of the torn kale. Sprinkle with salt. Bake until the edges brown but are not burnt, 10 to 15 minutes.
Radish Slaw
black radishes, scrubbed and grated
finely shredded cabbage
coarsely grated carrots, any color
thinly sliced green or red onion or shallots
fresh lemon juice
dash sugar
sunflower oil
finely chopped fresh parsley, cilantro, or mint leaves
In a bowl toss together the radishes, the cabbage, the carrots, the onion, the lemon juice, the sugar, the oil, the herb, and salt and pepper to taste. I omitted measurements on this one because I think this is one where you throw in what you have, in quantities that you enjoy!
Brussels Sprouts with Shallots
2-3 TB melted bacon fat, sunflower oil or olive oil 
2 lbs. Brussels spouts, washed and halved
3 medium shallots, sliced
salt and pepper to taste 
Toss Brussels sprouts and shallots with melted bacon fat or olive oil and salt and pepper. Roast in 400F (375F convection) oven for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Honey-Ginger Carrot and Parsnip Salad Topping
This is a great way to sweeten up a cold season green salad when seasonal salad favorites are not around. The idea is to roast the vegetables in a lemon-honey vinaigrette and serve on top of a green salad with sunflower shoots and whatever else comes to mind.
2 c carrots, diced small
2 c parsnips, diced small
1/4 c ginger, grated
3/4 c olive oil
1/8 c red wine vinegar
1/8 c lemon juice
tsp lemon zest (if you have)
pinch of dill
1/4 c honey, soft
extra honey to drizzle
In a bowl combine carrots, parsnips, ginger and lemon zest. In a small sauce pan, warm on low heat: oil, vinegar, lemon juice, dill and honey and combine well. Pour half of dressing onto chopped vegetables and mix well. Use a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper lay vegetables out evenly. Drizzle with honey and bake in the oven at 375F for 20-30 minutes until they are soft and begin browning. Remove from parchment paper right away and cool. Top green salad with veggie mix and use remaining dressing.

Steamed Parsnips with Sweet Butter Sauce
The parsnip’s humble appearance conceals its luscious taste; it needs very little fuss in order to be sweet and delicious. Simply steamed and topped with just a touch of maple syrup or honey, parsnips are irresistibly good. The tender strips in this recipe can be served whole, sliced, or even mashed. Friend of the Farm.
Place the parsnips in a steamer basket set over 1 1/2 inches boiling water and cover. Steam for 10 to 15 minutes depending on size. Transfer to a serving bowl.
Melt the butter in a small pot over medium heat. Remove the pot from heat and stir in the maple syrup or honey.
Pour the butter mixture over the parsnips. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.

Delivery Reminders!

This season is 17 deliveries over 18 weeks. Each year, we all take off 1 week in December to recharge. There will be NO DELIVERY the week of December 24.
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com