Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - December 21, 2017

Announcements!

THERE IS NO DELIVERY NEXT WEEK!

Reminder for Lean & Green Share members: Your last delivery is THIS WEEK! We'll let you know when this share is back in the spring. In the meantime, I hope you consider joining another share!
Thank you to those of you who filled out the survey last week about the Fall/ Winter Share so far. I really do appreciate the feedback. The share offerings this season are different from anything we've offered before, so your input is extremely helpful as we move forward. I do want to address a few things that came up:
For every "Too much celeriac!" is an "I love the celeriac!" I'll keep trying to find the right balance of roots! If you are interested in your site having a "swap box", let me know! I'll work with your site host to see if that's possible. Each site is a little different. The swap box would let members leave items they don't want for others.
Some issues with bad onions: unfortunately, we battled a bad onion problem earlier this season. If it persists, please let me know and I will replace them.
I've put in my plug, and your plug, for Brussels sprouts! They'll be back next year, barring any bug infestations. It was very sad when we learned the crop failed.
Frozen veggies will be in the share... but we still have bunched greens and fresh veggies from greenhouses so we're saving the frozen veggies until we don't have any more fresh produce! But don't fear, there will come a point in the share season where we will supplement with our frozen summer veggies.
Craving some Zesty Freezer Dill Pickles? Available for purchase in our online store!
Safe travels, happy solstice, and a very happy 2018! See you in the new year.
~ Taylar
 
Reminder!!!
We take off the week of Christmas, so no delivery next week!!
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
 
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!
 

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

 Salad Mix, Russet Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Mixed Beets, Rainbow Carrots, Parsley, Celery, and Garlic

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Sweet Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Mixed Beets, Chard, Celery, Garlic,

Fancy

Salad Mix, Fingerling Potatoes, Sunchokes, Mixed Beets, Leeks, Celery, Baby Napa Cabbage, Red Kale, and Rosemary

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Kohlrabi, Black Radish, Pac Choi, and Celery

Pete's Pantry

Patchwork Bakery Polenta Bread, Cellars at Jasper Hill Moses Sleeper, and Eggs
Salad Mix: Lettuce, claytonia, upland cress, spinach, and roots. A hearty blend
Russet Potatoes, also known as Idaho or baking potatoes, Russets are in the class of starchy potatoes, as opposed to waxy varieties like red and fingerling. They are high in vitamin C and B6, as well as natural sugars. Russets make great baking potatoes, and are ideal for mashing and making fries. Store potatoes in a cool dark place. Storing your potatoes in the refrigerator can make their starch turn to sugar and therefore should be avoided as doing so can give the russet potato an unpleasant, sweet taste. 
Celery: Wrap unwashed celery tightly in a plastic bag and store in the coldest part of your refrigerator. To maintain really crisp celery, store as you would basil or parsley. That is, place it upright in a glass of water in your fridge and cover loosely with a plastic bag.
SunchokesAlso known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes make their debut in the large share this week! You might know of this plant as a beautiful yellow flower on tall stalks that blooms in summer. The tubrous roots, which appear in your shares, are also edible. Eat with or without the skin, and prepare as you would potatoes: roast, saute, bake, boil, or steam. They can be stored for a few weeks in your fridge.

Featured Recipes

Basic Stir Fried Vegetables
Great stuff in the share this week for a stir fry! This recipe is from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian. There is of course room for endless variations here. You can swap in and out different veggies, add nuts to the final minute of cooking, add dried chiles or chile paste for heat, add tofu or tempeh (even better if cooked and browned first), or up to 1 TB sweetener (honey, maple syrup, etc). 
2 TB oil
1 TB minced garlic
1 TB fresh ginger
1/2 cup onions or scallions
1 medium zucchini, cut into slices or chunks
2 cups Napa cabbage
1 large carrot
2 stalks celery
1/2 lb green beans (preferable parboiled and then quickly cooled)
1/4 cup stock or water
2 TB tamari
1 tsp sesame oil (preferably dark)
Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the oil , and almost immediately the garlic, ginger, and scallions or onions. Cook stirring for about 15 seconds, then add carrots, celery, snow peas and stock and raise the heat to high.
Cook, stirring constantly, adding liquid (water or stock) if mixture is totally dry, until the vegetables are tender, about 7 minutes. Then add the sesame oil and soy sauce.
Celery Soup
This is a classic French recipe, this one taken again from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian.
3 TB butter
1 small onion
1 lb celery, roughly chopped (reserve the fresh greens for garnish)
1 large potato
salt and freshly ground black pepper
5 cups vegetable stock
2 tsp sugar or honey to taste (optional)
1/2 cup cream or sour cream (optional)
1/4 cup celery greens, finely chopped
Put the butter in a large, deep saucepan or casserole over medium heat. When the butter melts, add the vegetables. Season w/ salt & pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, until celery softens a bit. Add the stock and cook until the vegetables are very tender, 15 to 20 minutes more.
Puree the soup in batches in food processor or blender and return to the pot. You may prepare the soup in advance up to this point. Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days and reheat before proceeding.) Adjust the seasoning, adding more salt and pepper as needed. Reheat the soup in the saucepan and stir in the cream if you are using it, garnish with celery leaves and serve.
Roasted Beet and Onion Salad
If you are one of those folks who have never developed a love for beets, try roasting them. Roasting sweetens them and deepens their earthy flavor. Roasted beets keep well in the fridge for 4-5 days and are great tossed onto daily green salads. This recipe brings together roasted onions and roasted torpedo onions and tops them with parsley, all in the share this week. The original recipe is adapted from one by Clifford Wright. You could roast the onions and beets together but please watch the onions closely, they will be bitter if they blacken too much. The beets will take longer to roast.
2 medium size torpedo onions, sliced across the grain in 1/4 " rings
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 lb beets, roasted, peeled and sliced (roast all of your beets and save remainder for other salads)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
2 to 3 tablespoons finely chopped parsley or arugula
1 ounce toasted almonds, chopped (2 tablespoons chopped)
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place beets in a glass baking dish and add 1/4 inch of water and cover tightly and place in oven. Large beets over 8 oz will take 50-60 means to roast. Roast til they are easily pierced with a fork. Toss the sliced onions with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and salt to taste, and place on a lightly oiled baking sheet. Toward the second half of the roasting of the beets, place the onions in the oven and roast 15 minutes, turning the onions over halfway through. They should be nicely browned and just beginning to blacken around the edges, but not charred. Remove from the heat.
Remove beets carefully when roasted, and the skins will slip from them easily (you can run them under cool water briefly if too hot to handle when removing skins, they will still retain some warmth. Slice beets into discs.
Arrange the sliced beets on a platter. Arrange the onions over the beets. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Whisk together the vinegars, salt and pepper to taste and the remaining olive oil. Drizzle over the onions and beets. Sprinkle on the parsley or arugula and the almonds, and serve.

Meatless Red Flannel Hash
This recipe is from Barbara Kafka's Vegetable Love cookbook -- delicious with eggs your favorite way! Serves 4 as a side dish.
3/4 lb. whole beets, trimmed and scrubbed
2 large floury potatoes, scrubbed
2 tablespoons butter plus 1 tablespoon, melted
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium onions, coarsely chopped
16 fresh sage leaves, cut into thin strips
2 teaspoons kosher salt
7-8 grinds fresh black pepper
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
Roast beets until a knife easily slips into the flesh. When just cool enough to handle, slip off the skins and coarsely chop. Place the potatoes in a 3-qt saucepan with water to cover. Bring to a boil over high heat. Cook until just tender, about 25 minutes. Drain and refrigerate until cold. Remove the skins and cut into 1/2 inch cubes.
Heat 2T butter and the oil in a 10-inch nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook until translucent, about 5 min. Add sage and cook until wilted. Add the potatoes and cook until brown, about 15 minutes. As the potatoes begin to brown, use a spatula to turn, rather than stirring, so the potatoes don't turn to mush. When the potatoes have browned, add the beets, salt and pepper, folding them in with the spatula. Continue to cook for about 10 minutes. Pour in the vinegar and 1/4 cup water or stock. Cook for 2 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed. Pour in another 1/4 cup water or stock and cook until the liquid has been absorbed once more.
Place an oven rack on the 2nd level from the top and set oven to broil. Center a 9-10 inch glass pie dish over the skillet. Holding the pie dish in place, flip the skillet over, turning the hash out into the pie dish. Press down into an even layer. (The hash can be made ahead at this point and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before continuing.) Brush the top of the hash with the melted butter. Broil for 10 minutes, or until the top is crusty and nicely browned.
Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
This recipe comes from a blog whose writer first tried sunchokes in their CSA basket. If you're new to them too, this sounds like a great family-friendly way to try them out!
1 garlic clove
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
2 shallots, sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup grated fontina cheese
salt and pepper
Preparation
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a 9×9 ceramic dish with cooking spray. Cut the garlic clove in half and rub the cut sides onto the dish. Discard garlic.
Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes. Sprinkle the sliced shallots on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper. Pour milk all over the vegetables. Sprinkle with the fontina cheese.
Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes. Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Simple Roasted Sunchokes
.5 pound sunchokes, sliced into half-inch rounds
.5 pound potatoes or carrots, sliced into half inch rounds
2 Tablespoons oil
1 TB lemon juice
Sprinkle with dried Rosemary or thyme
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Toss the sunchokes with the oil & lemon juice. Sprinkle with the herbs. Bake in a shallow gratin dish with the herbs for thirty to forty-five minutes or until done. (Pierce them with the tip of a knife. They should be mostly tender but offer some resistance. Don’t let them get mushy.) Sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

Pantry Lore

Charlie Emers of Patchwork Farm and Bakery makes a wide variety of breads in his brick oven in East Hardwick. This week we have his Polenta Bread, made with organic flour and organic corn, sea salt, and the secret ingredient: deep well water. Polenta is made from ground corn, giving this bread a more substantial flavor and texture.
Moses Sleeper Cheese from Jasper Hill is a cheese inspired by French brie. This cheese’s historic namesake, Moses Sleeper, and his compatriot, Constant Bliss, were Revolutionary War scouts killed while defending a blockhouse along the Northeast Kingdom’s legendary Bayley Hazen Military Road. You can eat all of this cheese (rind and all). It's best when it's allowed to come to room temperature before cutting in.
And, Fresh Eggs from Tangletown Farm or Axel's Eggs.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - December 13, 2017

Announcements!

Reminder for Lean & Green Share members: Your last delivery will be next week, December 20/21. This share will return in late spring 2018! We'll let you know when. In the meantime, we want your feedback (survey coming this week)! And, we welcome you to join another weekly veggie share option. You can sign up for the other three shares - Everyday Standard, Everyday Large, or the Fancy Share - and get started January 3. Send me an email if you're interested in joining a new share option.
Weather: Winter is showing its true colors this week! It always seems like the snowiest days are Tuesday/ Wednesday, when most of our CSA packing and delivery happens! We strive to deliver the shares by the advertised pickup time, but there are can be factors out of our control during inclement weather. If any of our trucks get delayed, I will work my hardest to get that info to you ASAP so you're not at the site before your food is. We communicate any delivery delays or changes via email. If you prefer to receive the info another way, please let me know.
~ Taylar
 
Around the Farm
Aaahhh winter. The time for planning, ordering supplies, and investigating new equipment and ideas. And for the dedicated, hard working washhouse crew to wash and pack mountains of storage crops and send them out to all you hungry people!  

The first real snow is coming tonight and tomorrow. We'll have to start watching our connected greenhouses and maybe heat them in order to melt some snow off the roof. On Saturday we re-covered our original greenhouse on the Craftsbury farm. It's made out of logs and was built in the winter of 2003. For the past 14 years it's only had 2 sheets of plastic; it just got it third covering last weekend (see below). It's a tough old house; the cedar posts in the soil are starting to rot but it's still working well. We hope to get 5 more years of service out of it. 

We finished mulching 5 acres of garlic a couple weeks back. We used our bale chopper to shred and spread 150 round bales of straw and clover hay over the 5 acres. A couple days ago I rooted around in the mulch and was pleased to find dozens of earthworms working hard pulling the mulch down into the soil for food. I was surprised to see them so busy with soil temps near freezing. The garlic is well sprouted but has not emerged. 

Every winter we try to solve consistent crop problems. Currently one of our most difficult crops to produce reliably is Brussels sprouts. They suffer from both aphids and alternaria (a fungal disease) and this year were almost total junk. Many other organic growers in the Northeast have given up on them for the same reasons. We're digging in and developing a program for beneficial insects, crop covers, and beneficial companion plantings and are hopeful that we'll be able to produce pretty organic Brussels sprouts. 
Happy winter!
~ Pete
 
Reminder!!!
We take off the week of Christmas, so no delivery on December 27/28!!
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
 
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!
 

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

 Salad Mix, Spinach, Pac Choi, Yellow Onions, Rainbow Carrots, Rutabaga, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, Butternut Squash

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Rainbow Carrots, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, Squash

Fancy

Salad Mix, Spinach, Sorrel, Shallots, Rainbow Carrots, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Red or Green Kabocha Squash

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Spinach, Red Kale, Valentine Radish, Shallots

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Yogurt (pick one flavor!), Mcfarline's Apiary Honey, Ruth Antone's Jam (pick one)
Salad Mix: Lettuce, claytonia, upland cress, spinach, and roots. A hearty blend
Redbor Kale is in the super veggie club and is just about the healthiest vegetable you can eat. 1 cup packs 1300% of your daily requirements for Vita K, 200% of your Vita A, and nearly 100% of vita C, along with lots and lots more vitas and minerals. Over 45 different flavonoids have been identified in kale that combine to provide both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. It is now believed that kale offers risk-lowering benefits for five types of cancer including bladder, breast, colon, ovary and prostate cancer. It also has the ability to lower cholesterol (and for this purpose steaming is best). It is also now recognized that kale provides much support for your body's own detox system. And what's more, it's tasty, so eat lots. Keep kale loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. Strip the leaves from the stems and wash them well before chopping and cooking.
Squash: Sadly, our squash supply has come to an end! This is the last week of our winter squash. The Everyday and Fancy shares will each have a slightly different variety and/or size of squash! Try to use squash within a week. If you have any blemishes or soft spots, please just cut them off and enjoy the rest of the squash.
Napa Cabbage: On another side note, we had limited success with our Napa cabbage crop this year so unfortunately, this is it for Napa cabbage! You're receiving either a head of green Napa, a bunch of leafy green Napa, or a head of leafy red Napa. The leafy Napas are going to be perfect for a Napa cabbage salad. Napa goes wonderfully in Southeast Asian dishes, with ingredients like chili, curry, carrots, scallions, and radishes.
Peter Wilcox Potatoes: Peter Wilcox potatoes are in your share this week! Wilcox potatoes are beautiful purple potatoes. They are nicely textured, firm but not waxy, and wonderful whether roasted, boiled, or sliced into wedges or fried. They have a full earthy flavor that hints of hazelnuts. For best visual and nutritional effects, leave the skin on while cooking.

Featured Recipes

Scalloped Celeriac and Potatoes
Here’s a variation on a classic that just might be better than the original. Traditionally, scalloped potatoes are cooked in milk or cream; here, however, we cook them in stock, and the result is a more flavorful and delightfully lighter dish. The celeriac adds a brightness that assertively sets the dish apart from its classic cousin. Friend of the Farm.
Serves 6
butter for greasing the baking dish
1 pound celeriac, peeled, halved, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
1 pound baking potatoes, peeled, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated Gruyère or domestic Swiss cheese, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons butter
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Place the celeriac and potatoes in alternating layers in the baking dish, seasoning every few layers with salt and pepper. At about the halfway point, add 1/3 cup cheese in an even layer; sprinkle with the thyme. Continue with the celeriac and potatoes, until you have used all of your slices (don’t go all the way to the top edge; leave a little room to allow the liquid to boil).
Pour the stock over the celeriac and potatoes. Dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 15 minutes more. Sprinkle the remaining 2/3 cup cheese over the top layer, add several grindings of fresh pepper, and bake until the cheese turns golden, about 15 minutes.
Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.
Indian Style Potatoes, Carrots, and Turnips
No turnips? Try rutabaga, parsnip, or another root!
5 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon chili powder
Salt & pepper to taste
6 potatoes, diced
4 medium carrots, diced
1 large or 2 small gold turnips, diced
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Add the onion, and season with cumin, turmeric, coriander, chili powder, salt & pepper. Cook and stir until onion is browned.
Reduce the heat to medium, and stir in the potatoes, carrots and turnips. Stir to coat, then cover and cook until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally, and add water if necessary to keep from sticking to the pan.
Roasted Roots Side Dish
6 cups mixed root veggies of choice (parsnips, turnips, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, celeriac, potatoes, carrots, etc.) cut into uniform bite size pieces
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 Tbsp. sunflower oil or olive oil
3 Tbsp. white wine, sherry,
apple cider, broth, or water
2 Tbsp. chopped thyme
salt & pepper to taste
Instructions
Combine garlic, liquids, herbs, salt & pepper in large oven proof baking pan.
Stir in root veggies & bake at 450 degrees for about 45 minutes, stirring several times, until done.
If you have leftovers, this makes a delicious soup added to vegetable/chicken broth & pureed with some cream.
Roasted Red Kale
From Driftless Organics
1 bunch of red kale
Sunflower oil or olive oil
Salt & pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 425. Wash and dry and roughly chop the kale.
Toss with a drizzle of oil and a little bit of salt and pepper. (Not too much salt - the kale shrinks up a lot.)
Spread kale on a cooling rack on top of a cookie sheet.
Place in oven. Check after 7-8 minutes.
Remove from oven when the kale just turns brown.
Eat as a snack or side dish or garnish.
You will be amazed. The kale turns into a light crispy treat.
Sorrel Garlic Sauce
1 sorrel bunch
½ bunch chives, chopped
2 cloves garlics, chopped
2 Tbsp butter
¾ cup veggie or chicken broth
Lemon juice to taste
Salt & Pepper to taste
Saute the garlic and chives in the butter until tender, about a minute.
Add the broth and continue to cook for five minutes.
Place into food processor along with the sorrel, lemon juice and salt & pepper. Puree until smooth.
Return to the stove and keep warm until ready to serve. Goes great over baked potatoes, fish or lamb.
Spicy Asian Slaw with Napa Cabbage, Carrots & Ginger Dressing
3 tbsp rice vinegar
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp peeled and grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp canola oil
1/2 tsp grated lime zest
1 tbsp fresh lime juice
1/2 serrano chile, seeded and membranes removed, finely chopped
1 small Napa cabbage (about 1 1/2 pounds), halved lengthwise, cored, and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices
1 1/2 cups grated carrots
4 scallions, sliced
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
In a small bowl, whisk together rice vinegar, sugar, ginger, sesame oil, canola oil, lime zest, lime juice, and chile. Set aside.
Separate the cabbage leaves into a large bowl. Add carrots, scallions, and cilantro, and toss well.
Pour the dressing into the cabbage mixture and toss again. Let stand for 10 minutes, tossing occasionally.
Thai CSA Noodles
Although this recipe calls for Napa cabbage, you could easily use spinach, broccoli, kale and/or chard instead. Add an extra hot chili if you prefer, otherwise one chili provides a mild kick. Serves 6.
1 lb. pork sausage, plain or breakfast
1 lb. spaghetti or linguini 
2 tsp sunflower oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
3 garlic scapes chopped fine, or 3 garlic cloves minced
1 hot pepper, seeds removed, finely chopped, or 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 head Napa cabbage, sliced in thin ribbons
3 TB fish sauce
2 TB soy sauce
1 TB green curry paste
2 TB dry sherry
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
juice of 1/2 a lime
1 cup basil, julienned
1 cup cilantro, optional 
1 cup scallions, thinly sliced
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil while you fry the crumbled sausage in a large, heavy-bottomed pan or wok over medium-high heat. When sausage is fully cooked drain meat and reserve. Add pasta to the boiling water. Heat oil in the heavy-bottomed pan over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic and chili. Saute, stirring frequently, for 2-3 minutes. Add Napa cabbage. Cook, tossing frequently, for about 5 minutes, or until cabbage just begins to wilt. Add fish sauce, soy, sherry, curry paste, ginger, pepper and reserved sausage. Toss to combine and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in lime juice, basil, scallions and cilantro (if using). Drain pasta, reserving up to 1 cup of the cooking water. Toss the sausage and veggies with drained pasta, adding a bit of the reserved water, if necessary. 
Now available in the Online Market - handmade wreaths by Anners and Danika Johnson! Three styles of evergreen wreaths available for delivery with your CSA. Check them out!
Place your order by noon on Monday for a Wednesday (or Thursday) delivery!

Pantry Lore

The theme this week is breakfast! We have yogurt from Butterworks Farm in Westfield. Butterworks yogurt is made from rich and creamy Jersey cow milk. This is a cream-top style so you'll notice a thick layer on the top of your yogurt - just stir it up and enjoy! Butterworks raises its cows on organic, farm-produced feed. Yogurt that is good for you and good for the land from healthy cows. Please choose one flavor.
Mcfarline's Apiary is located in Benson, VT. This raw honey has never been heated or filtered, which is noted in its color and texture (compared to the golden, liquidy honey you might find in a plastic bear). It is extracted and allowed to settle in the bottling tank where after 1 -2 days most of the wax, propolis, and pollen float to the surface. Then, they bottle what is on the bottom. If you notice small particles on the top layer of your honey, this is just pollen, propolis, and/or wax, which only add to the therapeutic qualities of raw honey. It is unnoticeable while eating. Honey is extremely versatile. This time of year it is an important staple for staying healthy as raw honey is full of powerful antioxidants and acts as a natural cough suppressant. It also adds lovely flavor to yogurt!
Ruth Antone makes a diverse line of homemade jams from fruit she grows at her home in Williston. She doesn't use any sprays on her fruit trees. It always amazes me how different the climate is near Lake Champlain! Here she is with one of her cherry trees. You're receiving one of four kinds of jam: Plum, Cherry, Raspberry/ Blueberry, and Blueberry. Please take 1 jar.