Thursday, December 14, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - December 13, 2017

Announcements!

Reminder for Lean & Green Share members: Your last delivery will be next week, December 20/21. This share will return in late spring 2018! We'll let you know when. In the meantime, we want your feedback (survey coming this week)! And, we welcome you to join another weekly veggie share option. You can sign up for the other three shares - Everyday Standard, Everyday Large, or the Fancy Share - and get started January 3. Send me an email if you're interested in joining a new share option.
Weather: Winter is showing its true colors this week! It always seems like the snowiest days are Tuesday/ Wednesday, when most of our CSA packing and delivery happens! We strive to deliver the shares by the advertised pickup time, but there are can be factors out of our control during inclement weather. If any of our trucks get delayed, I will work my hardest to get that info to you ASAP so you're not at the site before your food is. We communicate any delivery delays or changes via email. If you prefer to receive the info another way, please let me know.
~ Taylar
 
Around the Farm
Aaahhh winter. The time for planning, ordering supplies, and investigating new equipment and ideas. And for the dedicated, hard working washhouse crew to wash and pack mountains of storage crops and send them out to all you hungry people!  

The first real snow is coming tonight and tomorrow. We'll have to start watching our connected greenhouses and maybe heat them in order to melt some snow off the roof. On Saturday we re-covered our original greenhouse on the Craftsbury farm. It's made out of logs and was built in the winter of 2003. For the past 14 years it's only had 2 sheets of plastic; it just got it third covering last weekend (see below). It's a tough old house; the cedar posts in the soil are starting to rot but it's still working well. We hope to get 5 more years of service out of it. 

We finished mulching 5 acres of garlic a couple weeks back. We used our bale chopper to shred and spread 150 round bales of straw and clover hay over the 5 acres. A couple days ago I rooted around in the mulch and was pleased to find dozens of earthworms working hard pulling the mulch down into the soil for food. I was surprised to see them so busy with soil temps near freezing. The garlic is well sprouted but has not emerged. 

Every winter we try to solve consistent crop problems. Currently one of our most difficult crops to produce reliably is Brussels sprouts. They suffer from both aphids and alternaria (a fungal disease) and this year were almost total junk. Many other organic growers in the Northeast have given up on them for the same reasons. We're digging in and developing a program for beneficial insects, crop covers, and beneficial companion plantings and are hopeful that we'll be able to produce pretty organic Brussels sprouts. 
Happy winter!
~ Pete
 
Reminder!!!
We take off the week of Christmas, so no delivery on December 27/28!!
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
 
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!
 

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

 Salad Mix, Spinach, Pac Choi, Yellow Onions, Rainbow Carrots, Rutabaga, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, Butternut Squash

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Rainbow Carrots, Peter Wilcox Potatoes, Squash

Fancy

Salad Mix, Spinach, Sorrel, Shallots, Rainbow Carrots, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Red or Green Kabocha Squash

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Spinach, Red Kale, Valentine Radish, Shallots

Pete's Pantry

Butterworks Yogurt (pick one flavor!), Mcfarline's Apiary Honey, Ruth Antone's Jam (pick one)
Salad Mix: Lettuce, claytonia, upland cress, spinach, and roots. A hearty blend
Redbor Kale is in the super veggie club and is just about the healthiest vegetable you can eat. 1 cup packs 1300% of your daily requirements for Vita K, 200% of your Vita A, and nearly 100% of vita C, along with lots and lots more vitas and minerals. Over 45 different flavonoids have been identified in kale that combine to provide both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. It is now believed that kale offers risk-lowering benefits for five types of cancer including bladder, breast, colon, ovary and prostate cancer. It also has the ability to lower cholesterol (and for this purpose steaming is best). It is also now recognized that kale provides much support for your body's own detox system. And what's more, it's tasty, so eat lots. Keep kale loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer. Strip the leaves from the stems and wash them well before chopping and cooking.
Squash: Sadly, our squash supply has come to an end! This is the last week of our winter squash. The Everyday and Fancy shares will each have a slightly different variety and/or size of squash! Try to use squash within a week. If you have any blemishes or soft spots, please just cut them off and enjoy the rest of the squash.
Napa Cabbage: On another side note, we had limited success with our Napa cabbage crop this year so unfortunately, this is it for Napa cabbage! You're receiving either a head of green Napa, a bunch of leafy green Napa, or a head of leafy red Napa. The leafy Napas are going to be perfect for a Napa cabbage salad. Napa goes wonderfully in Southeast Asian dishes, with ingredients like chili, curry, carrots, scallions, and radishes.
Peter Wilcox Potatoes: Peter Wilcox potatoes are in your share this week! Wilcox potatoes are beautiful purple potatoes. They are nicely textured, firm but not waxy, and wonderful whether roasted, boiled, or sliced into wedges or fried. They have a full earthy flavor that hints of hazelnuts. For best visual and nutritional effects, leave the skin on while cooking.

Featured Recipes

Scalloped Celeriac and Potatoes
Here’s a variation on a classic that just might be better than the original. Traditionally, scalloped potatoes are cooked in milk or cream; here, however, we cook them in stock, and the result is a more flavorful and delightfully lighter dish. The celeriac adds a brightness that assertively sets the dish apart from its classic cousin. Friend of the Farm.
Serves 6
butter for greasing the baking dish
1 pound celeriac, peeled, halved, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
1 pound baking potatoes, peeled, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated Gruyère or domestic Swiss cheese, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons butter
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Place the celeriac and potatoes in alternating layers in the baking dish, seasoning every few layers with salt and pepper. At about the halfway point, add 1/3 cup cheese in an even layer; sprinkle with the thyme. Continue with the celeriac and potatoes, until you have used all of your slices (don’t go all the way to the top edge; leave a little room to allow the liquid to boil).
Pour the stock over the celeriac and potatoes. Dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 15 minutes more. Sprinkle the remaining 2/3 cup cheese over the top layer, add several grindings of fresh pepper, and bake until the cheese turns golden, about 15 minutes.
Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.
Indian Style Potatoes, Carrots, and Turnips
No turnips? Try rutabaga, parsnip, or another root!
5 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon chili powder
Salt & pepper to taste
6 potatoes, diced
4 medium carrots, diced
1 large or 2 small gold turnips, diced
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Add the onion, and season with cumin, turmeric, coriander, chili powder, salt & pepper. Cook and stir until onion is browned.
Reduce the heat to medium, and stir in the potatoes, carrots and turnips. Stir to coat, then cover and cook until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally, and add water if necessary to keep from sticking to the pan.
Roasted Roots Side Dish
6 cups mixed root veggies of choice (parsnips, turnips, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, celeriac, potatoes, carrots, etc.) cut into uniform bite size pieces
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 Tbsp. sunflower oil or olive oil
3 Tbsp. white wine, sherry,
apple cider, broth, or water
2 Tbsp. chopped thyme
salt & pepper to taste
Instructions
Combine garlic, liquids, herbs, salt & pepper in large oven proof baking pan.
Stir in root veggies & bake at 450 degrees for about 45 minutes, stirring several times, until done.
If you have leftovers, this makes a delicious soup added to vegetable/chicken broth & pureed with some cream.
Roasted Red Kale
From Driftless Organics
1 bunch of red kale
Sunflower oil or olive oil
Salt & pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 425. Wash and dry and roughly chop the kale.
Toss with a drizzle of oil and a little bit of salt and pepper. (Not too much salt - the kale shrinks up a lot.)
Spread kale on a cooling rack on top of a cookie sheet.
Place in oven. Check after 7-8 minutes.
Remove from oven when the kale just turns brown.
Eat as a snack or side dish or garnish.
You will be amazed. The kale turns into a light crispy treat.
Sorrel Garlic Sauce
1 sorrel bunch
½ bunch chives, chopped
2 cloves garlics, chopped
2 Tbsp butter
¾ cup veggie or chicken broth
Lemon juice to taste
Salt & Pepper to taste
Saute the garlic and chives in the butter until tender, about a minute.
Add the broth and continue to cook for five minutes.
Place into food processor along with the sorrel, lemon juice and salt & pepper. Puree until smooth.
Return to the stove and keep warm until ready to serve. Goes great over baked potatoes, fish or lamb.
Spicy Asian Slaw with Napa Cabbage, Carrots & Ginger Dressing
3 tbsp rice vinegar
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp peeled and grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp canola oil
1/2 tsp grated lime zest
1 tbsp fresh lime juice
1/2 serrano chile, seeded and membranes removed, finely chopped
1 small Napa cabbage (about 1 1/2 pounds), halved lengthwise, cored, and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices
1 1/2 cups grated carrots
4 scallions, sliced
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
In a small bowl, whisk together rice vinegar, sugar, ginger, sesame oil, canola oil, lime zest, lime juice, and chile. Set aside.
Separate the cabbage leaves into a large bowl. Add carrots, scallions, and cilantro, and toss well.
Pour the dressing into the cabbage mixture and toss again. Let stand for 10 minutes, tossing occasionally.
Thai CSA Noodles
Although this recipe calls for Napa cabbage, you could easily use spinach, broccoli, kale and/or chard instead. Add an extra hot chili if you prefer, otherwise one chili provides a mild kick. Serves 6.
1 lb. pork sausage, plain or breakfast
1 lb. spaghetti or linguini 
2 tsp sunflower oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
3 garlic scapes chopped fine, or 3 garlic cloves minced
1 hot pepper, seeds removed, finely chopped, or 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 head Napa cabbage, sliced in thin ribbons
3 TB fish sauce
2 TB soy sauce
1 TB green curry paste
2 TB dry sherry
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
juice of 1/2 a lime
1 cup basil, julienned
1 cup cilantro, optional 
1 cup scallions, thinly sliced
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil while you fry the crumbled sausage in a large, heavy-bottomed pan or wok over medium-high heat. When sausage is fully cooked drain meat and reserve. Add pasta to the boiling water. Heat oil in the heavy-bottomed pan over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic and chili. Saute, stirring frequently, for 2-3 minutes. Add Napa cabbage. Cook, tossing frequently, for about 5 minutes, or until cabbage just begins to wilt. Add fish sauce, soy, sherry, curry paste, ginger, pepper and reserved sausage. Toss to combine and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in lime juice, basil, scallions and cilantro (if using). Drain pasta, reserving up to 1 cup of the cooking water. Toss the sausage and veggies with drained pasta, adding a bit of the reserved water, if necessary. 
Now available in the Online Market - handmade wreaths by Anners and Danika Johnson! Three styles of evergreen wreaths available for delivery with your CSA. Check them out!
Place your order by noon on Monday for a Wednesday (or Thursday) delivery!

Pantry Lore

The theme this week is breakfast! We have yogurt from Butterworks Farm in Westfield. Butterworks yogurt is made from rich and creamy Jersey cow milk. This is a cream-top style so you'll notice a thick layer on the top of your yogurt - just stir it up and enjoy! Butterworks raises its cows on organic, farm-produced feed. Yogurt that is good for you and good for the land from healthy cows. Please choose one flavor.
Mcfarline's Apiary is located in Benson, VT. This raw honey has never been heated or filtered, which is noted in its color and texture (compared to the golden, liquidy honey you might find in a plastic bear). It is extracted and allowed to settle in the bottling tank where after 1 -2 days most of the wax, propolis, and pollen float to the surface. Then, they bottle what is on the bottom. If you notice small particles on the top layer of your honey, this is just pollen, propolis, and/or wax, which only add to the therapeutic qualities of raw honey. It is unnoticeable while eating. Honey is extremely versatile. This time of year it is an important staple for staying healthy as raw honey is full of powerful antioxidants and acts as a natural cough suppressant. It also adds lovely flavor to yogurt!
Ruth Antone makes a diverse line of homemade jams from fruit she grows at her home in Williston. She doesn't use any sprays on her fruit trees. It always amazes me how different the climate is near Lake Champlain! Here she is with one of her cherry trees. You're receiving one of four kinds of jam: Plum, Cherry, Raspberry/ Blueberry, and Blueberry. Please take 1 jar.

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - December 6, 2017


THIS WEEK IS A MEAT WEEK!

Announcements!

Lots of exciting things to announce!
BAGS! We have found a use for the plastic bags that carry your weekly veggie shares! We're looking to partner with the Montpelier Food Pantry, which is in need of clean plastic bags. When you go to pick up your share, you can leave your CLEAN bags at your pickup site. We'll get them to the farm and then to one of our Monteplier CSA sites, where they will be used by the Food Pantry. Please wash out your veggie bags (no red meat bags, please).
Look for a survey very soon about our new share offerings. We want your feedback about how we're doing. I plan to get that out in another week or so.
NEW SHARES! We're about to launch a new share add-on program. Sign up for weekly deliveries of fresh eggs, fresh bread, or delicious award-winning artisan cheeses! The egg share is $5.75/ week, the bread share is $6.50/ week, and the cheese share is $9/ week. More info is available online. The egg share will start next week, 12/13, while the bread and cheese shares will start when we reach a minimum number of participants.
And, back by popular demand... a LOCALVORE share! Sign up for the Fancy + Pantry Share, our new Localvore Share. Or, buy this share for your favorite local foodie as a unique and meaningful Christmas present!
GIFT CERTIFICATES available in any denomination! Buy a share in someone's name or buy them a gift certificate to use towards a future share.
~ Taylar
Reminder!!!
We take off the week of Christmas, so no delivery on December 27!!
Need to skip a delivery? We can donate your share to the food shelf, send it the next week, or credit your account for a future share. Please notify us by Monday, 8 am, at the latest for any changes to that week's delivery.
Shop locally!! Give the gift of VEGGIES this Christmas! We have gift certificates available - make it even easier for your loved ones to stay healthy. Buy local and buy fresh! Any denomination available. $50 will buy two weeks of an Everyday Standard Share - our most popular size!

This week in your share:

Everyday Large

Salad Mix, Sweet Salad Turnips, Lacinato Kale, Garlic, Celeriac, Red Beets, Adirondack Red Potatoes, and Butternut Squash

Everyday Standard

Salad Mix, Arugula OR Lettuce Head, Lacinato Kale, Garlic, Goldball Turnips, Yellow Onions, Adirondack Red Potatoes, Butternut Squash

Fancy

Salanova Lettuce Head, Radicchio, Fennel, Cippolini Onions, Red Beets, Celeriac, Adirondack Red Potatoes, and Butternut Squash

Lean & Green

Salad Mix, Red Cabbage, Pac Choi, Fennel, and Mixed Carrots

Pete's Pantry

Champlain Orchards Apples, Honest to Goodness Apple Cider Vinegar, Slowfire Bakery Bread, and Tangletown Farm Eggs (for half the sites - see note below)
Salad Mix: Lettuce, claytonia, upland cress, spinach, and roots. A hearty blend
Fennel: Crunchy and slightly sweet with the flavor of anise, fennel is delicious served raw but is just as often served cooked on its own or in other dishes. This fennel is mostly small, so it may not look like much, but it brings the flavor anyway! This is actually our last distribution of fennel for the year. Until next season, fennel! Though most often associated with Italian cooking, it has an uncanny ability to blend with other flavors adding a light and fresh note. It is delightful in soups and stews and sauces and is particularly at home with tomato sauce dishes. Fennel is composed of a white or pale green bulb from which closely superimposed stalks are arranged. To prepare, cut off the hard bottom and slice vertically or into quarters. Or cut the bulb in half lengthwise, cut out the core, and cut into strips. Add it raw to salads or try some thinly sliced fennel on your sandwich. Top thinly sliced fennel with plain yogurt and mint leaves. Or braise, roast or saute it. It is done when tender enough to pierce easily with a skewer.
Butternut Squash: This week's butternut is in a class of squash all its own, known for being both nutty, sweet and because the flesh is so smooth and silky on the inside. It is great for mashing, soups, roasting and probably most loved because it is easy to peel and boil making is perfect for quick dinners with the kids.
Celeriac: Let's call this the "black sheep" of the root family. An underappreciated root veggie that is so versatile! It's great for roasting, mashing, soup making, and more! Celeriac is a great potato substitute or try mixing it in with your potatoes. Last night I made tacos and cubed it up in small chunks, then roasted with cumin, chili powder, garlic, salt & pepper, and olive oil. It made a great filling along with some refried Jacob's Cattle beans, roasted squash, sauteed onions, and sharp cheddar cheese. Store unwashed celeriac in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, where it will keep for several weeks. Soak celeriac briefly in warm water and then scrub it with a stiff brush. Take a thin slice off the top and bottom and peel it with a sharp paring knife or a sturdy vegetable peeler. A few deep crevices will remain; leave them, or slice them out. Remove the core if it seems pithy or hollow. Like apples, celeriac will darken if exposed to the air for too long. If you don’t plan to cook it immediately, submerge the celeriac in a bowl of water with lemon juice squeezed in.

Featured Recipes

Celeriac and Apple Salad with Tarragon and Roasted Walnuts

Serves 4 to 6
4 cups water
juice of 1 lemon (about 3 tablespoons)
2 tart apples, peeled, cored, sliced into 1/4-inch strips
1 large celeriac, peeled, cut into matchstick-sized strips
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 1/2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon heavy cream
2 teaspoons prepared Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
salt
1. Combine water and lemon juice in a large bowl. Add the apple slices and celeriac strips and let stand for 15 minutes (this acidified water will keep the celeriac and apple from turning brown).
2. Toast the walnuts in a dry skillet over high heat, stirring frequently, until they begin to darken in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. Let cool.
3. Drain the celeriac and apple mixture; return to the bowl, add the vinegar, and toss.
4. Combine the mayonnaise, cream, mustard, tarragon, pepper, and salt to taste in a small bowl. Pour the dressing over the celeriac and apple mixture; toss to coat. Add the walnuts and toss again. Chill for at least 1 hour before serving (2 or 3 hours is even better).
Scalloped Celeriac and Potatoes

Serves 6
butter for greasing the baking dish
1 pound celeriac, peeled, halved, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
1 pound baking potatoes, peeled, sliced about 1/8 inch thick
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated Gruyère or domestic Swiss cheese, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons butter

1. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
2. Place the celeriac and potatoes in alternating layers in the baking dish, seasoning every few layers with salt and pepper. At about the halfway point, add 1/3 cup cheese in an even layer; sprinkle with the thyme. Continue with the celeriac and potatoes, until you have used all of your slices (don’t go all the way to the top edge; leave a little room to allow the liquid to boil).
3. Pour the stock over the celeriac and potatoes. Dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 15 minutes more. Sprinkle the remaining 2/3 cup cheese over the top layer, add several grindings of fresh pepper, and bake until the cheese turns golden, about 15 minutes.
4. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.
Mock Potato Salad
I just found this recipe when looking for new ideas for celeriac. It sounds delightful! It's labeled "paleo" and low carb and uses a variety of items that have appeared in the share over the past couple of weeks, with root veggies substituting the potatoes. If you try it, let me know!
Spices for boiling vegetables:
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
½ tsp salt
Salad & dressing:
1 medium rutabaga / swede
1 medium turnip
½ medium celeriac
4-6 pickled cucumbers
6 large eggs, free-range or organic
1 small white onion
1 large celery stalk, sliced
¾ cup mayonnaise
1 tsp Dijon mustard
2 tbsp pickle juice or 2 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp celery seeds
2 tbsp each freshly chopped parsley and chives
½ tsp salt or to taste
freshly ground black pepper
Start by cooking the eggs. Fill a small saucepan with water up to three quarters. Add a good pinch of salt. This will prevent the eggs from cracking. Bring to a boil. Using a spoon or hand, dip each egg in and out of the boiling water - be careful not to get burnt. This will prevent the egg from cracking as the temperature change won't be so dramatic. To get the eggs hard-boiled, you need round 10 minutes. This timing works for large eggs. When done, remove from the heat and place in a bowl filled with cold water.
Peel the rutabaga, celeriac and turnip. Dice into ½-1 inch pieces. You may want to cut the rutabaga into smaller pieces as it takes longer to cook than turnips and celeriac. Place in a pot filled with water and add the vinegar, whole peppercorns, salt and bay leaves.
Bring to a boil over a high heat. Then, reduce the heat to medium and simmer until the rutabaga is tender for 10-15 minutes (time depends on the size of the pieces). Once cooked, take off the heat and pour through a colander. Discard the spices. Set aside to cool down and then place in a mixing bowl.
Peel and finely chop the onion and dice the pickles. Add the onion and pickled to the mixing bowl with the cooked vegetables.
When the eggs are chilled, peel off the shells. To do it, simply roll the eggs against a chopping board until the shell cracks. Remove the top part of the shell. Then, insert a spoon and run it under the shell until it falls off. This way you will avoid the egg white from sticking to the shell and breaking off.
Chop the eggs into small pieces and place in the bowl with the vegetables. Add the pickle juice (or vinegar) and mix until well combined.
Add the mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, sliced celery stalks, freshly chopped herbs and the celery seeds. Mix until well combined and season with salt and pepper to taste. For best results refrigerate and serve the next day. All the spices, herbs and vegetables will blend together and make the flavor more intense.
Store in the fridge for up to 5 days.
Fennel And Kale Pasta
Sweet fennel and greens work beautifully together.
1⁄2 c olive oil
1 onion, minced
1 medium fennel bulb fronds removed, halved and thinly sliced
salt and pepper
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 lb spaghetti
up to 3 lb kale or other cooking green washed and chopped
1 c grated parmesan
Heat oil in a large braising pan or skillet with a cover. Add onion; sauté over medium heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in fennel; sauté until golden, about 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat until fennel is tender, about 8 minutes longer. Stir in vinegar; simmer to blend flavors, 1 minute longer. Adjust seasonings.
Meanwhile, bring 4 quarts water to boil in large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt and the pasta; return to boil. Add kale; continue to cook until pasta is al dente, about 7 minutes.
Drain pasta and greens; toss with fennel mixture and cheese. Transfer portions to warm pasta bowls. Garnish with reserved minced fennel fronds. Serve immediately with more cheese passed separately.
Low Carb Fennel Gratin
2 large fennel bulbs, stalks and fronds removed
2 tbs water
½ cup heavy cream
1 tsp garlic paste (or minced garlic)
salt and black pepper
2 green onions, finely chopped
¼ cup grated Parmesan
Chop the fennel bulbs into small wedges or slices, whichever you prefer.
Place them in a microwave-safe bowl with the water, then cover and microwave for 5 minutes on full power. Drain the fennel and transfer to a baking dish.
Mix together the heavy cream, garlic, salt, and black pepper. Add the green onions and pour everything over the fennel. Sprinkle some grated Parmesan over the top of everything.
Bake in a preheated oven for 12-15 minutes until the top is golden brown.
Marinated Beets
A little sugar softens the edge of the vinegar here and complements the natural sweetness of the beets. Keep these on hand for healthy snacks, or add to salads.
1 bunch beets
1/3 cup red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar
Salt to taste
2 garlic cloves, cut in half
2 teaspoons sugar
Place the beets in a saucepan, cover with water, add 1/4 cup of the vinegar and salt to taste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer until tender, 30 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the beets. Remove from the heat, add the garlic to the pot and set aside to cool.
Remove the beets from the pot (do not drain), slip off the skins and cut in wedges.
Combine the remaining vinegar and the sugar. When the sugar has dissolved in the vinegar, stir in 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid from the beets. Toss with the beets and the garlic. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, then remove the garlic from the marinade. Remove the beets from the marinade with a slotted spoon to serve.
Black Bean & Butternut Squash Chili
Black beans and winter squash, who would have thought they would make such a great pair. This is a mild version of the recipe. If you like a spicy chili feel free to add some red chili pepper or go ahead and throw some sweet corn in for a sweeter version. Adapted from epicurious.com.
2 cups dried black beans (about 6 cups cooked)
3 Tbs cooking oil
2 yellow onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves
1 ½ tsp salt (plus more to taste)
1 Tbs chili powder
2 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground coriander
3 c butternut squash, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces (1 small butternut squash)
1 bay leaf
2 ½ c broth (combination water and bean cooking liquid, chicken or veggie stock)
2 medium, fresh tomatoes (or one 15-oz can, diced)
3 cups coarsely chopped mustard or kale greens
Soak black turtle beans in 3x the amount of water overnight, or for 8 hours. (Or, do a quick-soak: Bring beans and 3x the amount of water to a boil, turn off heat, and soak, covered, for 1-2 hours.) Rinse beans and place in a large pot with 3x the amount of fresh water. Bring to a boil and cook, partially covered, for 1 hour or until beans are tender.
Heat oil in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add onions and sauté until tender and golden. Add garlic, salt, and spices and sauté 1-2 minutes more. Add butternut squash, bay leaf, broth, tomatoes with juices, and black beans and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. Taste for seasoning, adding more salt as necessary. Stir in greens and simmer until chard is tender but still bright green, about 2 minutes. Ladle into bowls and serve with optional chili accompaniments like sour cream, fresh cilantro or scallions, etc.
Now available in the Online Market - handmade wreaths by Anners and Danika Johnson! Three styles of evergreen wreaths available for delivery with your CSA. Check them out!
Place your order by noon on Monday for a Wednesday (or Thursday) delivery!

Pantry Lore

It's an apple-y kind of week this week! First up is Silken apples from Champlain Orchards. This is an unique variety with a white gold porcelain color and an outstanding texture and flavor.Honest to Goodness Apple Cider Vinegar comes from the homestead of Jo Liddell and Bob Machim, Gingerbrook Farm, carved out of the woods of South Washington, VT 40 years ago. As they cleared for their fields, they found wild apple trees and decided to keep them. The land around their home is dotted with these old wild trees and it is from these trees and others nearby their farm that Bob makes their cider vinegar. This is the real macoy, Honest-to-Goodness cider vinegar as they call it, a health tonic, and almost good enough to drink straight! It starts with unpasteurized apple cider that Bob seeds with a "mother" culture of yeast that ferments the cider. The difference between apple cider gone bad due to the infiltration of natural airborne yeasts and a good artisanal cider vinegar is in controlling the process. The mother culture makes a big difference, as does the fresh cider used for the vinegar, and the aging process. Bob ages this vinegar for two years and poured the beautiful amber liquid from big wooden barrels in a corner of his home. In time, you may find a slippery gelatinous mass forms in your cider vinegar. Fear not! This is just more "mother" forming in your jar. Just remove it from jar and continue to use your vinegar.
Tangletown Farm eggs round out the share for half our members. The following pickup sites will have eggs delivered NEXT WEEK, 12/13: Concept2, Laughing Moon, Farm Mkt, White Meeting House, Henry St, Ward St, Bessery's, Kilburn St, Petra Cliffs, Sebring Rd, Shelburne, Little Garden Mkt, NRG, Williston, and Richmond. I apologize for the late notice - Lila informed me today that pigs got into the eggs and the flock has not been laying well the past few days so she was short on eggs. Looking for something hopeful to enjoy? Check out the recently released video from NOFA-VT: Farm Kids Rooted in the Land. There, you'll meet the farm kids of Tangletown Farm! Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/nB2Q5gnc94w
Your bread this week comes from Slowfire Bakery in Jeffersonville. This week's loaf is Blonde Country: sourdough made with durum wheat grown and milled in Maine, which imparts a lovely golden color and an aroma reminiscent of holiday spices.

Meat Share

A feast of meats! This month features a diversity of meat products. First up: ground chicken from Maple Wind Farm. Maple Wind, a diversified farm in Richmond and Hinesburg, does not use any vaccinations on their animals, which are raised on natural and organic farm-produced feed. Their chickens are moved daily for free-ranging pasture foraging. All of this produces meat that is higher in omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally raised meat. Use this ground chicken to make patties for a chickenburger or throw it into spaghetti sauce, on top pizza, or into tacos. You can also make chicken balls for soup, sloppy joes, or just do chicken meatballs!
Every once in a while we include some non-traditional meats and this month it is goat stew meat from Vermont Chevon, based out of Danville. Vermont Chevon utilizes culled goats from dairy goat farmers who cannot use the male kids; many of the goats are now sourced from Ayers Brook Goat Dairy, the milk suppliers for Vermont Creamery. Goat is the most popular meat consumed around the world and is healthier and leaner than most other meat. Shirley Richardson, the founder of Vermont Chevon, shared the recipe below.
McKnight Farm is an organic beef and dairy farm based in East Montpelier. You will receive one of two cuts: the sandwich meat is versatile for stir fries, stews, and sandwiches while the ground beef is perfect for a variety of Mexican-style dishes, burgers, meatballs, and when you want some red meat instead of ground chicken!
The next three products come from VT99, our partnership with Jasper Hill Farm. You'll receive a package of pork chops, bacon ends, and sausage. The sausage flavor will be either kimchi or beet. Either one is unique and delicious! The packages of bacon ends is new for us, so feedback is great! Bacon ends are the "trimmings" from making bacon. Ideally, packaged bacon is all the same length, so in an effort not to waste everyone's favorite pork product, the ends are saved and repackaged. Evan Bendickson, the project manager for VT99, suggests using this in soups or crumbling and cooking it up for a salad topping or baked potato topping. Other ideas include adding to refried beans or southern style green beans. Use it any way you would use crumbled bacon.
Gingery Meatball Soup with Pac Choi
1 piece fresh ginger
1 large egg
2 scallions
1 clove garlic
kosher salt
Pepper
½ c. chopped fresh cilantro
¼ c. bread crumbs
1 lb. ground chicken
6 c. low-sodium chicken broth
1 red chili pepper
1 medium carrot
2 - 3 heads pac choi
Heat broiler. Line a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick foil. Grate enough ginger for 1 tablespoon and thinly slice the remainder.
In a large bowl, whisk together the egg, scallions, garlic, grated ginger, and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Stir in the cilantro, then the bread crumbs. Let sit for 2 minutes. Add the chicken and mix to combine.
Form the meat mixture into 1 1/2-inch balls (about 20 total) and place on the prepared baking sheet. Broil until cooked through, 6 to 8 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, bring the broth, sliced ginger and chili to a boil. Add the carrot and simmer for 1 minute. Add the bok choy and simmer until just tender, about 3 minutes. Add the meatballs and stir in additional cilantro, if desired.
Vermont Red Wine and Goat Stew
coarsely chopped bacon
2 pounds boneless goat meat, cut into 1-inch pieces (note: your shares include 1 pound; reduce all ingredients if only using 1 pound of meat or keep as is if you are unfamiliar with goat)
⅓ cup all-purpose flour, or as needed
3 tablespoons olive oil, or as needed
½ tablespoon smoked sweet paprika*
½ tablespoon salt
½ tablespoon fresh-ground black pepper
1 medium sweet onion, such as Vidalia or Walla Walla, thinly sliced
3 medium cloves garlic, minced
2½ cups dry Vermont red wine, such Boyden Valley’s Riverbend Red
1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes in juice
¾ cup low-sodium beef stock, plus more if needed
1 tablespoon tomato paste
½ tablespoon brown sugar, or to taste
⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
1 bay leaf
1 pound carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally into 1-inch pieces
1 pound potatoes, unpeeled, cut into ½-inch-wide wedges
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley, plus extra for garnish
Crusty bread
Preheat the oven to 300°.
Cook bacon in a heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium heat until crisp and browned, about 10 minutes.
Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon and drain on paper towels. Reserve bacon fat in pot.
Pat the goat meat dry with paper towels. In a medium bowl, dredge the meat in flour and season with paprika, salt and pepper.
In the same pot used to cook the bacon, heat the reserved bacon fat and 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Working in batches, cook the meat until browned on all sides, adding additional oil if needed, about 6 minutes. Remove meat from the pot and set aside. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and onion and sauté, stirring often, until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 1 minute.
In the same pot, stir in the wine, tomatoes and juice (breaking up the tomatoes with a fork), beef stock, tomato paste, cinnamon, pepper flakes, Worcestershire sauce, thyme and bay leaf.
Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Return the meat to the pot and cook in the oven, stirring occasionally, until meat is tender, about 3 hours for chevon meat. After 2 hours of cooking add the carrots, potatoes and reserved bacon.
Whisk in butter until melted. Stir in the parsley. Discard bay leaf and adjust seasonings with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with parsley and serve with crusty bread, if desired.
*Note: You can turn up the heat by substituting smoked hot paprika.
Cheddar Corn Chowder
This recipe uses frozen corn and potatoes- use your Adirondack Reds for an unexpected splash of color in this chowder.
4 ounces bacon, chopped
1/8 cup good olive oil
2 large onions, chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup flour
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
6 cups chicken stock
3 cups medium-diced potatoes, unpeeled (1 pound)
1 package frozen corn
1 cup half-and-half
1/4 pound sharp white cheddar cheese, grated
In a large stockpot over medium-high heat, cook the bacon and olive oil until the bacon is crisp, about 5 minutes. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat to medium, add the onions and butter to the fat, and cook for 10 minutes, until the onions are translucent.
Stir in the flour, salt, pepper, and turmeric and cook for 3 minutes. Add the chicken stock and potatoes, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the corn to the soup, then add the half-and-half and cheddar. Cook for 5 more minutes, until the cheese is melted. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Serve hot with a garnish of bacon.