Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 31, 2017


Localvore Members 
& Full Veggie Only Share Members
take a LIGHT GREEN BAG

This week your bag contains:

Mesclun Mix, Arugula, Chard, Radishes, Rhubarb, Onions, Nicola Potatoes, and

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Corn




Half Veggie Members
take a YELLOW BAG containing:
Romaine Lettuce, Cilantro, Broccoli Raab OR Red Russian Kale, Red Savoy Cabbage, Yellow Onions, Nicola Potatoes, and 

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Sweet Peppers




Localvore / Pantry Offerings

Slowfire Bakery Bread
Sweet Rowen Farmstead Farmer's Cheese
Tangletown Farm Eggs


Only ONE week of the Spring Share left!

Sign up today for the Summer CSA Season!
June 14 - October 4

Don't miss out on your weekly deliveries!

Can you help us spread the word? We've found that neighbors, coworkers, friends, and family members are all encouraged to join our CSA when they hear from current members - you! Help us spread the word through Front Porch Forum - contact me and I'll help you craft a message!

Around the farm...

We're ready for summer!! After today, there is only ONE WEEK left of the Spring CSA share! Sign up today to keep your weekly veggie deliveries going all summer long! Summer's a great time to eat locally: fresh tomatoes from the vine, sweet and hot peppers, eggplant, broccoli, cauliflower, and so many greens - we're just getting started! We have some new surprise veggie varieties for you, too!
At the end of last summer, like we do every share season, we sent out a survey asking about what veggies you liked/ didn't like and what you wanted more of/ less of. We read that survey - truly. And talked about it. Melissa used it to plan out her seed ordering and planting schedule. We all made notes and talked about what we should grow more of and what we may want to cut back on. So, we hear you! We're taking your feedback and incorporating that into our CSA planning for this summer.
After next week's last Spring Share delivery, I'll send out a survey to gather your feedback on the spring season. We really want to hear from you! Along the way, members have shared feedback - positive and negative - and it has helped us figure out our veggie delivery program. Sometimes we send out brief surveys throughout the season. This week, some of our Chittenden County site members received a survey about delivery scheduling and the response was overwhelming: a Saturday delivery is not popular! We may tweak the Summer delivery schedule some, but we're keeping pickups during the weekday.  
As always, thanks so much for joining us and supporting our local agricultural economy!

~ Taylar


Storage and Use Tips 
Greens: Full shares are receiving a bag of mixed field greens this week while half shares are receiving a head of Romaine lettuce. Romaine grows in a tall head of sturdy leaves. This lettuce makes a great salad or adds some crunch to a sandwich. Store it in the fridge in a large plastic tub with a piece of paper towel to absorb excess moisture and condensation. If you store wet lettuce in a produce bag, it will likely only last a couple days.

Rhubarb (full shares): More of this delicious fruit this week! Only the stalks of rhubarb are eaten, the leaves of the rhubarb plant are not edible. This week we tried to cut off the green tops for you. Rhubarb is perfect for pie or a crisp but try it in a savory dish, like the Indian-inspired stew recipe below. Store in your fridge in the crisper drawer until ready to use.
Chard (full shares)Chard is a dark leafy green with ruffled leaves and stems that may be brightly colored crimson red, orange, yellow. It's actually related to the beet, whose greens can be used like hard. Try chard on its own or in quiches and omeletes. Young and tender leaves and stems can be tossed into salads. Store wrapped loosely in plastic in the refrigerator; it will last several days. To prepare it, wash it well and tear or chop the leaves. If the stems are very thick, strip the leaves from them before proceeding so you can cook the stems a couple minutes longer. Steam, braise, and saute chard. Cook the stems longer than the leaves by starting them a minute or two earlier. Try chard in crecipes that call for beet or turnip greens or spinach.
Broccoli raab or Red Russian Kale (half shares): Though its name might suggest otherwise, broccoli raab is not actually a broccoli. It belongs to the brassica family, along with mustard greens, turnips, and cousin broccoli. Like mustard greens it has a strong peppery bite, milder when the plant is young, stronger as it gets older. And like broccoli it grows florets but they remain small tucked between the large leaves, with taller flower stalks protruding from the plant. All of these parts of broccoli raab are edible, either raw or cooked. It is very high in calcium, potassium, iron, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Store broccoli raab and kale in your refrigerator crisper unwashed, either wrapped in a wet towel or in a plastic bag. It will keep two or three days. For longer storage, blanch and freeze.
Arugula (full shares): Also known as rocket, arugula is a very popular and versatile green that can be eaten raw, but also stands up well in the sauté pan. It has a peppery mustardy flavor and is great on sandwiches to give them pep, and into salads to take it up a notch. It also does well with a quick wilt added to pastas, frittatas or calzones, or as a stand-in for lettuce on an Italian-inspired sub. It blends particularly well with goat cheese and balsamic and olive oil. It is delicious simply sautéed in a pan with olive oil with a sprinkle of coarse salt & pepper. I love throwing it atop a pizza.


Radishes (full shares): These fresh French breakfast radishes are delightfully crisp and their flavor ranges from mildly peppery to a bit sweet. French breakfast radishes can be round in root shape but most are oblong and two - four inches in length. They're known for their vibrant coloring and crisp, midly spicy flavor. Heating removes both the radishes' crunch and their peppery bite; to avoid that you can add them at the end of the cooking process. Try glazed radishes made by placing a 2:2:1 ratio of butter, sugar, white vinegar in a pan and gently cooking until diced or quartered radishes are tender and the liquid evaporates. Season with salt and pepper. The tops are edible! 

Cabbage, Red Savoy (half shares only): Cabbage comes in many forms and flavors, and this week we have a Red Savoy cabbage, with tender, crinkly, light green leaves (the red comes from the tough outer leaves, which we've removed already). Cabbage is best tasting when raw or quickly cooked, like in a stir-fry or very lightly poached. Store it fresh in the refrigerator; it'll last a long time. To prepare, remove the first layer or two of exterior leaves and then remove the core. Use a thin-bladed knife to cut a cone-shaped section wider than the area of the core out of the stem end. To shred it, cut the cabbage into quarters and cut crosswise into thin strips or use a mandoline. Try a nice slaw with shredded cabbage, carrots, and radishes with a cilantro- apple cider vinegar - olive oil (or Full Sun canola oil!) dressing. Perfect for warm weekend days!


Veggie Storage and Use Tips are on our website too, so please bookmark the recipe and storage tip section. I am sure you will find it useful.


Need to Skip a Week?

If you're ever not able to pick up your share, please let us know at least one week in advance. We can either skip your share and give you credit, send it the next week, or donate it to the food pantry. It's up to you!

Sorry, we cannot skip a share or change pick-up sites after noon on Monday.

Localvore Lore
This week's localvore / pantry items are:

Today's bread from Slowfire Bakery in Jeffersonville is a Table Loaf: a relatively light blend of Quebec white flour w/ whole spelt & rye and sifted wheat from Maine, and malted barley from Peterson Quality Malt in Monkton.  It's somewhat rustic and pairs well with just about anything.


To enjoy atop your fresh bread, we have Sweet Rowen Farmstead's Garlicky Tomato Farmer's Cheese. Made from milk of a heritage lineback breed of cows, this farmer's cheese is enhanced with the taste of garlic and tomatoes. It's great on bread, bagels, and crackers. Sweet Rowen Farmstead is featured in this month's edition of Edible Green Mountains. Read more about our friends and neighbors at Sweet Rowen here.

Located just a couple miles from Sweet Rowen is Lila Bennett's Tangletown Farm. Lila's laying hens made it out to pasture full time a few weeks ago. The hens are happy to be back frolicking, foraging, and free ranging outside! You can find Lila and family every Saturday at the Montpelier Farmers' Market.


Recipes

You can find more recipes by searching our website and/or our blog

Pasta with Chard
Here's a recipe from the Moosewood collective - simple, quick, and easy, yet a tasty way to get your greens. Adding dried cherries and foregoing the cheese makes this recipe an excellent source of iron.

Use ziti or another chunky pasta and a big bunch of chard. While the pasta water comes to a boil (always salt your water - it should taste like sea water), cut the chard stems into 1/2 inch slices and chop the leaves. Saute the stems first for a minute or two before adding the garlic and leaves. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the leaves are wilted but still brightly colored. Season with salt and pepper and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Top the pasta with the chard and grated Pecorino Romano, Parmesan, or Asiago cheese or crumbled ricotta. Another nice addition to pasta with chard is dried cherries soaked in a few tablespoons of hot pasta water while the pasta cooks, plus some toasted walnuts.

Buttered Cabbage
For Christmas this year I received Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian - THE book on vegetables! I'll be sharing a lot of recipes from this book, which I've only just recently received. Bittman recommends this as a side dish or combined with other relatively plain dishes, like boiled potatoes, egg noodles, etc.

Boil a medium to large pot of water - salt it well. Put 2-4 Tablespoons of butter in a small saucepan over medium-low heat and melt it; it's okay to let it brown a little bit but don't burn it.

When the water boils, add the cabbage and cook, stirring every now and then, until it becomes tender, about 5 minutes. Remove with tongs or a slotted spoon and drain well; toss gently with the melted butter and serve.

Indian- Spiced Lentils with Rhubarb and Greens
Rhubarb doesn't have to be just sweet - try this savory rhubarb dish!

2 Tbs. olive oil, divided
2 Tbs. yellow mustard seeds
2 1/2 tsp. whole cumin seeds
3 Tbs. minced fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.)
1 medium red onion, chopped (11/2 cups)
1/2 cup golden raisins
1 cup brown lentils, rinsed and drained
3 1/2 cups vegetable broth
1/2 lb. fresh rhubarb, cut into 1/4-inch slices, or 1/2 lb. frozen sliced rhubarb, thawed
6 cups baby spinach leaves (or arugula, kale, chard, or other cooking green)
1/2 cup chopped cilantro

Heat 1 Tbs. oil in nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Add mustard and cumin seeds. Cover skillet, and cook 2 minutes, or until seeds begin to pop. Cook 1 to 2 minutes more, or until popping stops, shaking skillet often. Remove from heat, stir in ginger and garlic, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover, and set aside.

Heat remaining 1 Tbs. oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and raisins; sauté 10 minutes, or until onions begin to brown. Stir in lentils and 3 cups broth; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 25 minutes. Stir in rhubarb and remaining 1/2 cup broth; cook 6 minutes. Add spinach, cover, and cook mixture 6 minutes more. Stir mixture to incorporate rhubarb and spinach leaves, then stir in spice mixture. Serve garnished with cilantro.

Radishes Braised with Shallots and Vinegar
Serves 2 to 4 as a side dish

1 tablespoon butter
2 slices bacon, diced (optional)
2 large shallots, finely sliced
1 pound radishes, about 2 bunches, tops trimmed and radishes sliced in half
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup water
2/3 cup finely chopped Italian parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat the butter and bacon over medium-high heat in a wide, heavy skillet — preferably cast iron. Cook for about 5 minutes. When the bacon is cooked through and getting crispy, place the radishes cut-side down in the pan and cook undisturbed for 2 to 3 minutes or until the bottoms begin to brown. Add the shallots and cook, stirring, for another minute.

Add the balsamic vinegar and the water — the water should just come up around the sides of the radishes. Cover, lower the heat, and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the radishes are tender.

Remove the lid and continue to simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the liquid has reduced into a syrupy sauce. Add the the parsley and stir to wilt.

Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Quick Sauteed Greens
Memorize this "recipe" as a versatile way to prepare your cooking greens! This is a fast and tasty way to enjoy your dark leafy greens. The cooking time varies depending on the type of greens and how young or tender they are. Most are done in 5 - 6 minutes. Easy to adjust based on how many greens you have.

about 8 cups of chopped chard, kale, collars, broccoli raab, etc.
2 Tbsp olive oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
a pinch or two of red pepper flakes (optional)
1/2 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Cut the stems of chard crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces and coarsely chop the leaves. Remove the tough stems of kale or collars and discard; then coarsely chop the leaves. Cut bunches of broccoli raab crosswise, separating out the lower stems to cook first.

In a large skillet on medium-high heat, warm the oil. Add the garlic and red pepper and saute briefly. Add the stems of chard or broccoli raab and saute for a minute or two. Add as many chopped leaves as you can comfortably stir in the skillet. As the leaves wilt, add more. Saute until greens are limp and tender but still bight green. Season with S&P. Serve immediately.

Variation: Add a splash of vinegar just before serving. Adding acid to greens is both a Southern style and a great way to ensure your liver absorbs the iron in the greens.
  

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 24, 2017


Localvore Members 
& Full Veggie Only Share Members
take a LIGHT GREEN BAG

This week your bag contains:

Mesclun Mix, Lettuce head, Basil, Broccoli raab, Rhubarb, Orange Carrots, Red Cabbage,

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Stir Fry Mix OR Sweet Peppers 




Half Veggie Members
take a YELLOW BAG containing:
Mesclun Mix, Rhubarb, Radish, Orange Carrots (some share members will receive a cucumber),

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Cauliflower




Localvore / Pantry Offerings

Full Sun Canola Oil
Pete's Greens Pesto
Pete's Greens Zesty Dill Pickles


Only TWO weeks of the Spring Share left!

Sign up today for the Summer CSA Season!
June 14 - October 4

Same great produce, different season! Enjoy all the best summer delights!

Can you help us spread the word? We've found that neighbors, coworkers, friends, and family members are all encouraged to join our CSA when they hear from current members - you! Help us spread the word through Front Porch Forum - contact me and I'll help you craft a message!

Around the farm...
Last week the crew spent a lot of time planting cover crops and spreading manure. Not glamorous farm work, but important nevertheless. We had a group of students from Burke Mountain Academy visit us and they got to help out around the farm. 

Another important farm worker is our populations of bees that live in greenhouses. These bumblebees live in these little boxes and every day they fly out to eat, thus pollinating our crops. They always return because of the sweet nectar inside the boxes. Pollination is vital to getting some crops to flower, like tomatoes and zucchini. These bees have the right kind of "buzzing" the flowers need for 
optimal pollination. We use these bee kits because in greenhouses, wind and natural pollinators are almost entirely absent, so we need to bring in insects to ensure pollination happens - that's how we end up with such delicious tomatoes! 
We're signing up for the Summer Share, which starts in just TWO WEEKS! Sign up today so you don't forget!

~ Taylar

 


Mike (closest to the machine) works with a couple of Burke Moutnain Academy students to show them how the big barrel washer works! This is where we wash and sort root crops like carrots.



Storage and Use Tips 
Mesclun: Both shares are receiving a large bag of greens this week. This is a mix of fresh greens harvested this morning from the field. It's a larger bag than normal!

Rhubarb: A sure sign of spring and summer is rhubarb! Many years we have to buy this item from other farmers, but after a few years of bulking up our rhubarb plants, we have enough to include rhubarb for all CSA members! Rhubarb is a very old plant, and has been harvested by people for over 4000 years. Only the stalks of rhubarb are eaten, the leaves of the rhubarb plant are not edible. Rhubarb is perfect for pie or a crisp! Store in your fridge in the crisper drawer until ready to use.
Broccoli raab (full shares): Though its name might suggest otherwise, broccoli raab is not actually a broccoli. It belongs to the brassica family, along with mustard greens, turnips, and cousin broccoli. Like mustard greens it has a strong peppery bite, milder when the plant is young, stronger as it gets older. And like broccoli it grows florets but they remain small tucked between the large leaves, with taller flower stalks protruding from the plant. All of these parts of broccoli raab are edible, either raw or cooked. In Asia and Italy the plant grows wild and is popular, and it is cultivated in the rest of the world. It is very high in calcium, potassium, iron, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Store broccoli rabe in your refrigerator crisper unwashed, either wrapped in a wet towel or in a plastic bag. It will keep two or three days. For longer storage, blanch and freeze.
Lettuce Head (full shares): We're into greens season at the farm! Here are the first of our lettuce heads. We have a mix of lettuces so you may receive a tender butterhead lettuce, a hearty Romaine, or a delicate red head.


Radishes (half shares): These fresh French and Easter radishes are delightfully crisp and their flavor ranges from mildly peppery to a bit sweet. Easter egg radishes are petite and round with thin, wiry taproots. Colors of their skin range from white to pink to crimson to purple and are wonderful raw or equally as good cooked. French breakfast radishes can be round in root shape but most are oblong and two - four inches in length. They're known for their vibrant coloring and crisp, midly spicy flavor. Heating removes both the radishes' crunch and their peppery bite; to avoid that you can add them at the end of the cooking process. Try glazed radishes made by placing a 2:2:1 ratio of butter, sugar, white vinegar in a pan and gently cooking until diced or quartered radishes are tender and the liquid evaporates. Season with salt and pepper. The tops are edible! 

Euro Cucumber (half shares; some sites only): Share members who did not receive cucumbers last week will get them this week. The Euro cukes are seedless and distinguishable by their long, skinny share. They are nice for making into dressings, relishes, and sauces or for eating plain.

Veggie Storage and Use Tips are on our website too, so please bookmark the recipe and storage tip section. I am sure you will find it useful.


Need to Skip a Week?

If you're ever not able to pick up your share, please let us know at least one week in advance. We can either skip your share and give you credit, send it the next week, or donate it to the food pantry. It's up to you!

Sorry, we cannot skip a share or change pick-up sites after noon on Monday.

Localvore Lore
This week's localvore / pantry items are:
This week we’re sending out Full Sun Canola Oil, a VT-grown and pressed canola oil that is certified GMO free. This oil is a fresh and delicious craft oil to use every day for cooking, sautéing, in marinades or dressings.  Full Sun is based out of Middlebury. From the Full Sun website: "Our oils come to you fresh from seeds grown on family farms. We can even tell you who grew the oil in each bottle. And as New England's first Non-GMO Project verified oil mill, we're committed to increasing the amount of non-GMO crop production in the Northeast ~ providing opportunities for farmers and producers to move forward into new, more sustainable markets."  Canola growing in Alburgh, VT 

These Zesty Dill Freezer Pickles were made right here at the farm. Last summer when our cucumbers were going crazy, we got busy in the kitchen making our special freezer pickles. These pickles are sweet and sour and are great eaten right out of the container or added to a sandwich.  They are a freezer pickle and we are sending them out frozen so you may need to thaw a bit more in order to enjoy, or you can put right back in the freezer for a later date (use within 6 months).  Once open keep refrigerated and eat within 3 weeks.

Our Basil Pesto contains our organic basil to which we add lots of garlic, parmesan and romano cheeses, lemon, and olive oil. Some of our pesto may be slightly oxidized on the top (which darkens it), but mix it up and it will regain its vibrant green color. My current favorite way to use pesto is to toss cubed potatoes with a liberal scoop, and roast in a 450 degree oven for 25-30 minutes.



Recipes

You can find more recipes by searching our website and/or our blog

Beet Salad with Canola Oil dressing
Serves: 2, Prep time: 25 mins (excluding the time for cooking the beets)

3-4 medium sized beets
2-3 thinly sliced red radishes
1/2 cup arugula
1/2 cup julienned carrots

Dressing:
1/4 cup Full Sun extra virgin canola oil
1/4 cup Full Sun extra virgin sunflower oil
1 tsp. maple syrup
1 tsp. grated ginger root (or pickled ginger if preferred)
1 finely minced clove of garlic
1 tsp. tamari sauce
Pinch of salt
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

Steam or boil beets until tender, blanch in cold water and/or peel the skins.

Using a whisk or blender, combine dressing ingredients and use half to marinate the cooked peeled beets and reserve half to use for dressing the finished salad.

Optional: sprinkle fresh goat cheese over salad.

Easy Basil Garlic Aioli

1 cup Full Sun extra virgin sunflower oil
2 eggs
4 cloves garlic, peeled
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 cup fresh basil leaves
Salt & pepper to taste

Pour oil and eggs into wide mouth Mason Jar. Add peeled garlic cloves, lemon juice, & basil. Put the immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar and turn it on and draw blender up and down at least 2 or 3 times to draw air into sauce. Add salt & pepper to taste.

Refrigerate and enjoy with meats, sandwiches, chips, fries, etc.

Rhubarb Dream Bars 

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, divided
1/3 cup confectioners' sugar
1/2 cup cold butter or margarine
1 1/4 cups sugar
2 eggs
2 cups finely chopped rhubarb
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup flaked coconut

In a bowl, combine 1 cup flour and confectioners' sugar. Cut in the butter until crumbly. Pat into a lightly greased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees F for 13-15 minutes or until edges are lightly browned.

In a bowl, combine the sugar and remaining flour. Add eggs; mix well. Stir in rhubarb, walnuts and coconut; pour over crust. Bake 30-35 minutes longer or until set. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into bars.

Glazed Radishes

1 bunch radishes
1 tbsp butter
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tbsp white vinegar
Coarse salt and ground pepper

Cut radishes in half.  Combine all ingredients in a saucepan heated over medium-high heat.  Cook until the liquid evaporates and radishes are tender.

Rhubarb-Lemon Squares
An amazing recipe, especially with Butterworks cornmeal. Recipe from spring 2015 Edible Green Mountains.

Shortbread
¾ cup butter, diced
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup cornmeal
⅓ cup sugar

Rhubarb-Lemon Filling
¾ pound rhubarb, washed and diced
¼ cup maple syrup
4 egg yolks
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon lemon zest
2 teaspoons lemon juice
3 tablespoons butter, diced

For the shortbread: Preheat oven to 350° and butter a small gratin dish (any variation on the 8- by 8-inch size will do). Place all of the ingredients for the shortbread in a bowl and knead the butter into the dry ingredients with your fingers. When it has the consistency of moist breadcrumbs and all the butter is incorporated, pour into the gratin dish and press down into the bottom. Put in the oven and bake for about 15 minutes or until it just begins to brown. Remove from the oven.

For the filling: Put the rhubarb in a saucepan with the maple syrup and place over medium heat. Let the mixture simmer and break down until the rhubarb has “melted” into a purée and most of the liquid is boiled off. Set aside.

In a medium-sized pot put the yolks, sugar, zest, juice and butter. Stir with a whisk over medium-low heat until the sugar has dissolved and it starts to thicken (about 5 minutes). Add the rhubarb purée and cook an additional 3 minutes over low heat, stirring constantly, being careful not to let it scorch. Pour the mixture over the shortbread and return to the oven for 8 minutes. Remove when the rhubarb purée has just begun to set.

Let cool, cut into squares and dust with some confectioner’s sugar if you wish.

Broccoli Raab with Sausage

1 pound broccoli rabe
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 ounces hot Italian sausage—casings removed, meat crumbled
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
Pinch of crushed red pepper
Salt
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup grated pecorino cheese

In a pot of salted boiling water, cook the broccoli rabe until nearly tender, 4 minutes. Drain and cool under cold water. Squeeze and pat dry, then chop.

In a skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add the sausage and cook over moderately high heat, breaking it up into small pieces, until browned. Add 3 more tablespoons of oil, the garlic and red pepper to the skillet and cook for 1 minute. Add the broccoli rabe and cook, stirring, until tender, 3 minutes. Season with salt. Add the lemon juice and toss. Serve with pecorino.
  

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 17, 2017


Localvore Members 
& Full Veggie Only Share Members
take a LIGHT GREEN BAG

This week your bag contains:
Bag of Greens, Parsley, Cilantro, Chard, Red Beets, Yellow Onions, Russet Potatoes,

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Pumpkin Puree
Frozen Sweet Corn

Please, only take 1 of each





Half Veggie Members
take a YELLOW BAG containing:
Bag of Greens, Parsley, Cucumber OR Red Beets, Pac Choi, Yellow Onions, Russet Potatoes, and

And OUT of the Bag:
Frozen Pumpkin Puree




Localvore / Pantry Offerings

Patchwork Farm and Bakery Bread
Ploughgate Creamery Butter
Mary's Granola


Around the Farm...

More and more planting is happening everyday at the farm! Potatoes, onions, and greens, and more successions of greens, need to get in the ground while the greenhouses need constant check-ups. Every sunny day the sides of the greenhouses are rolled up to let in light and natural warm air. Farm equipment is getting painted and tuned up. Pete's a blur as he rushes by to one field or another. Eloise is busy stocking the farmstand for its first opening on Thursday, May 18. And we're back at the Montpelier Farmers Market! Find us there every Saturday until 2 pm. 

Driving by freshly tilled fields is a beautiful sight, and watching them turn brown to green is a sure sign of summer! So are the tomatoes in the greenhouses... slowly growing bigger every day!

After this week, there are just 3 deliveries left of the spring share - sign up for summer today so you don't miss a week!

~ Taylar

SUMMER IS ALMOST HERE!

Sign up today for the Summer CSA Season!
June 14 - October 4

Same great produce, different season! Enjoy all the best summer delights!

Now with a delivery stop in Waitsfield! Spread the word - tell your friends!


And, we now accept payment with a credit card! Woo hoo!


Storage and Use Tips 
Braise Mix or Arugula: You'll receive either a bag of braise mix (can be eaten raw or cooked; includes spinach, baby kale, mizuna, and upland cress) or arugula (also known as rocket, a spicy Italian green for fresh salads or eaten sauteed). Greens are already washed and ready to eat. Store your greens in plastic in the crisper. They should last at least one week, longer if kept cool and moist. This is our first week of field harvesting greens (these aren't greenhouse greens!), which is actually about 10 days later than usual, given our rainy and cloudy spring so far. Here's a picture Pete sent this morning (Tuesday) as they were harvesting greens:
Chard: Rainbow Chard is a delicious nutritious green, high in Vitamins A, K, and C.  The beautifully colored stems are why it's called rainbow chard!  Chard works great as a spinach substitute but needs to be cooked down a bit longer.  It also works well in soups and stews, or sauteed as a side. Store in your crisper drawer loosely wrapped in plastic.
Pac Choi (half shares): Bunched pac choi coming your way this week. Part of the cabbage family, this green packs in nutrition with high scores for vitamins A and C and calcium. Pac choi is mild enough to be chopped up for a salad, particularly if you give it a quick wilt in a hot pan. It's also great in stir fries and sautes and in Asian-inspired soups. As leaves become more mature, they are often served cooked; these are still fairly young. Pac choi has a mild flavor with leaves tasting similar to Swiss chard and the stems (called ribs) deliciously crispy - substitute for celery in many recipes. Store pac choi loosely wrapped in plastic in your crisper drawer.
Cilantro (full shares): Actually a member of the carrot family, cilantro is the leaves and stems of the coriander plant. Cilantro has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean, and Asian cooking. The leaves and stems can be chopped and added to salads, soups, and sauces, and can garnish many meals. If you can't use all your cilantro just yet, you can freeze it. Wash and gentry dry it with a towel. Then either put sprigs loosely in a plastic bag and freeze them, or lightly chop it, measure by the tablespoon into ice trays, filling remaining space with water, and after the cubes have frozen, store it in a plastic bag. Take it out to thaw anytime you need to use it. Store fresh in your fridge - you can even try the jar of water trick with a plastic bag over the top.

Parsley: First parsley of the season! Parsley has lots of benefits: many claim that flat-leaf parsley has more flavor than curly but all parsley has huge nutritional benefits - high in vitamins A, C, and K, and in folic acid (great for pregnant women!). The activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a "chemoprotective" food, meaning it can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens. Try adding parsley stems to your simmering stock, both to impart flavor and help clarify the broth. It can be sprinkled on a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetables sautés, and grilled fish. It can be a rub for chicken lamb, and beef when combined with garlic, lemon zest, and salt. It's a key flavor ingredient in the Mediterranean dish tabouli (see recipe below). Parsley goes very nicely with beets. A nice way to store is to place the parsley bunch stems in a glass of water, like flowers in a vase, and then cover loosely with a plastic bag and keep in the fridge.  If this is too finicky, just store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in crisper drawer.

Euro Cucumber OR Red Beets (half shares)We have enough cucumbers to offer half of the half veggie share members. We plan to send cukes, or something similar, to the other half of the veggie share members next week. This week, half share members may receive either a European cucumber or beets. The Euro cukes are seedless and distinguishable by their long, skinny share. They are nice for making into dressings, relishes, and sauces or for eating plain. Beet colors stay true while cooking, but if boiling together red and gold beets (which some of you will have!), the red will take over! Try halving and roasting them in the oven at 350 degrees F. When beets are soft, the skins are easily removed. Cool the beets and then dice or slice how you would while preserving the colors of individual beets. Toss in dressing, etc. when cool or reheat as a meal. Try grating them to use on greens salads or in slaw. Make sure to keep beets in fridge until you want to use them.

Russet Potatoes: Russet potatoes, also known as Idaho or baking potatoes, are in the class of starchy potatoes, as opposed to waxy varieties like red and fingerling. They are high in vitamin C and B6, as well as natural sugars. Russets make great baking potatoes, and are ideal for mashing and roasting. Store potatoes in a cool dark place, away from onions.

Frozen Pumpkin Puree (both shares): Both full and half veggie members are receiving a 2-quart package of frozen pumpkin puree. This puree was made last year in partnership with High Mowing Seeds. We utilize their "trial" pumpkins in our puree, so your package is a blend of different pumpkin varieties. Try using your puree for a pie, as a base to a soup or pasta sauce, or bake it in a casserole. You could also try making a pumpkin bread or other sweet treat.

Need to Skip a Week?

If you're ever not able to pick up your share, please let us know at least one week in advance. We can either skip your share and give you credit, send it the next week, or donate it to the food pantry. It's up to you!

Sorry, we cannot skip a share or change pick-up sites after noon on Monday.


Localvore Lore
This week's localvore / pantry items are:

Patchwork Farm and Bakery: Anna Rosie's Country French Bread makes an appearance this week, baked fresh from Charlie Emers at Patchwork Farm and Bakery in East Hardwick.

Ploughgate Creamery Butter: A very special butter this week from Ploughgate! We get to try Marisa's Ramp Butter, made with locally foraged ramps from the Mad River Valley. Tis the season to enjoy what is both planted and found naturally in the wild. Ramps are a wild leek so this butter will have a nice oniony/ garlicky flavor to it. It's not available outside of our CSA and is only available for a limited time (due to ramp seasonality), so I hope you enjoy!

Mary's Granola: Amy's kids have done it again! Amy Skelton, longtime Pete's employee and former CSA Manager, and her daughter Mary Jane came up with this granola recipe as a low fat, high protein granola for everyday eating. It's made with organic rolled oats from Compton, Quebec, organic seasame seeds, organic sunflower seeds, organic shredded coconut, cinnamon, vegetable oil, and honey. The honey comes from their family's bees. Mary decided to start making granola because she loves eating it and wants to have her own business. Mayhaps you have some yogurt left to top with this granola?!
 





Above: Mary with the granola, delivering en route to school
Right: Mary helping Amy with the bees




Recipes

You can find more recipes by searching our website and/or our blog

Tabouli
Tabouli is such a great dish to have sitting in fridge to ladle on as a side to grilled meat and green salad.  Or just as a quick snack.  Make sure you give it time to marinate in the fridge as it's best after having a chance to sit to bring flavors together.  Serves 6.

1 cup bulgur
1 1/2 cups boiling water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice -- and/or lime juice
1 teaspoon garlic -- crushed
1/2 cup chopped scallions
1/2 teaspoon dried mint flakes
1/4 cup olive oil -- (good quality)
fresh black pepper
2 medium tomatoes -- diced
1 cup fresh parsley -- chopped and packed

Optional: 1 cup chopped cucumber and/ or 1/2 cup coarsely grated carrot

Seared Beets with Walnuts over Wilted Chard with Greens

5 small beets
3 tbsp olive oil
1 bunch swiss chard leaves, stems removed and leaves finely chopped (or other cooking green)
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
Sea salt
Aged red wine vinegar
small handful of walnut halves or pieces
Feta or goat cheese
Crushed aniseeds or dried oregano
A handful of greens

Steam the beets in simmering water, covered, until tender but still a bit firm when pierced with a fork, about 25 minutes for small beets, longer for larger ones. When cool, either slip off the skins with your hands or peel them neatly with a knife.  Cut them into wedges.

Heat 1 tbsp oil in a wide skillet over medium heat.  Add the beets and cook them, turning as needed, until seared, 10 to 15 minutes.

While the beets are cooking, rinse the chard and drain in a colander but don't dry.  Heat 1 tbsp oil in a second wide skillet over high heat.  When the oil is hot, add the chard, garlic, and a few pinches of salt.  Turn the greens as they cook, taking care that the garlic doesn't burn.  The water clinging to the chard will steam the greens then evaporate.  When shiny and tender, add 1 tbsp vinegar and toss it with the chard.  Taste for salt.

Loosely arrange the chard on a small platter and cover with the beets, walnuts, and cheese.  Crush a pinch or so of aniseeds and sprinkle them over the salad, then drizzle the remaining oil over all and sprinkle with more vinegar and salt.  Finish with the greens and serve.

Parsley Potatoes
Here's a delicious, easy recipe to serve alongside any dish. I was a little skeptical at first when I saw this recipe, but I was very surprised at how delicious it was! I substituted veggie bouillon for chicken broth.

1 1/2 pounds potatoes
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 cup chicken broth
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Place the potatoes into a large pot full of salted water. Bring the water to a boil; then reduce heat. Simmer covered, for 10 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
Meanwhile, heat oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Sauté onion and garlic for 5 minutes or until tender. Pour in broth and 3/4 cup of the parsley; mix well. Bring to a boil.

Strain potatoes from the cooking water and place in a serving bowl. Sprinkle the black pepper into the skillet and stir. Pour the peppered sauce over potatoes and sprinkle with remaining parsley.
Cilantro Potato Salad
Recipe courtesy Emeril Lagasse. Serves 5-6.
1 cup mayonnaise
3/4 cup cilantro leaves
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 pounds potatoes, cooked and halved (unpeeled)
1/3 cup finely minced onions

In a bowl, stir together mayonnaise with cilantro, garlic, salt and 7 turns black pepper. Add potatoes and onions and toss to combine thoroughly; cover and refrigerate up to 24 hours before serving.

Sweet and Sour Pac Choi
This is a great dish - the greens are a little tangy and the sauce is sweet. Serves 4.

2 tbsp oil
1 onion, cut in slivers
pac choi, left whole, bigger ones cut in half the long way
2 tbsp maple sugar
2 tbsp vinegar
1 tbsp soy sauce

Combine sugar, vinegar, soy sauce in a small bowl. Set aside. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a wok or large skillet. Stir fry the onions until browning, remove to a bowl. Add remaining tbsp oil, stir fry the pac choi in a couple batches until they have a few browned spots, the green tops wilt and the stems are crisp tender. Add the onions back into the wok with all the greens and stir in the sauce. Cook another 30 seconds. Sprinkle with red pepper flakes if you like.

Cold Sesame Noodles
A Martha Stewart Living recipe from 2004. Feel free to play around with the ingredients and the noodles in this recipe.

1 package (10 1/2 ounces) dried udon noodles
1 baby bok choy
1/4 cup smooth peanut butter
5 tablespoons toasted sesame oil (or canola oil)
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup rice-wine vinegar (not seasoned)
1 large garlic clove, minced
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes
Sesame seeds and cilantro, for garnish

Bring a large pot of water to a boil; cook noodles according to package directions. Drain; let cool completely.

Bring 3 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan; boil bok choy 30 seconds. Drain; rinse well. Let cool; coarsely chop.

Whisk together the peanut butter, oil, soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, sugar, and red-pepper flakes. Put sauce, noodles, and bok choy into a bowl; toss well. Sprinkle with seeds and cilantro.