Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Good Eats Newsletter - September 28, 2011

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:

Spinach; Banana Fingerling Potatoes; Romanesca Cauliflower; Mixed Colorful Carrors; Broccoli; Red Torpedo Onions; Beet Greens; Green Peppers; Cayenne Peppers, Cilantro plus....

2 Sugar Dumpling Winter Squash


Localvore Offerings Include:

Crooked Mile Chevre with Roasted Garlic and Red Pepper

Red Hen Cyrus Pringle Batard

Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs


Onions Drying on the Porch



Storage and Use Tips


Sugar Dumplings Winter Squash-

Oh how I love these sweet little fall delicacies. These beautiful squash deserve to occupy prime real estate on your dinner plate. Or in your dessert bowl! An oh-so simple recipe below calls for baking with a little butter, a little sweetener to take it up a notch and some spices. When you finish scraping the inside of the rind, you will be looking for more.


Romanesca Cauliflower - A very striking vegetable, the Romanesca variety of cauliflower has a beautiful light green color with pointed florets instead of the usual rounded. Originally from Northern Italy, its taste is somewhat milder than the traditional cauliflower as well. Cook as you would a regular specimen. Consider blanching the florets and adding to a crudite platter. Store unwashed in a loosely wrapped plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.








Good Eats Fall/Winter Share

Sign Up Now to Reserve Your Share!


Are you ready for winter? We will have such a great share this year. Pete is planting the greenhouses with baby greens now and getting succession crops lined up to keep us all in something green in the weeks and months ahead. We have preserved an amazing abundance of summer crops in the last month and we'll be doling out this summer goodness all winter long.

The Fall/Winter Veggie Only Share is designed to give you something fresh and green each week as well as a selection of stored, frozen or processed crops from the summer. We'll have a mix of summer and fall vegetables into November. Hardy greens and some other cold tolerant field crops will be included well into December, and then the later weeks of the share will feature more storage favorites like potatoes, carrots, onions, winter squash and cabbages along with the our winter greens mix and frozen summer goodies. Our newly re-assembled on-farm kitchen has allowed us to process and freeze many items for the winter veggie share like corn, cauliflower, tomatoes, peppers ... and even watermelon (yes watermelon!).

Join the Localvore Share and, in addition to your vegetables, receive eggs, cheeses, staples and other locally produced value added products from Pete's Greens and other great businessees around the area.

And for the kind hearted carnivores out there check out our Fall/Winter Meat Share including Pete's Pastured meats and sustainably produced meats and seafood from the area.

Check our website for more details about Fall/Winter Share details, pricing, pick-up locations and sign up information.



Changes to Your Delivery?


If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let me know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or I can stop your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.



Localvore Lore


Crooked Mile Fresh Chevre - Here's something scrumptiously decadent and new for you to try! Roberta Gillot of Crooked Mile Farm makes her chevre from the goats that she and her family raise on the Waterford farm they are restoring. It all started just four years ago when her then 9 year old daughter Lauren had the urge to milk. So they bought her two goats. And then the goats kidded and they had more goats. And more milk. So they learned to make cheese! They use only the milk from their 12 milk does to make their cheese - a real micro dairy (Roberta said she was begging the does over the weekend to produce enough milk to finish our CSA order!). Roberta's 12 year old son Benjamin is now the farm herdsman. They take care to grow high quality pasture and hay for their goats, in order to make the best tasting cheese. They make several goat cheese spreads, this roasted garlic and red pepper variety (made with garlic from their farm and local peppers); a fresh ginger chevre which is really interesting, different and delicious; a black pepper chevre and several others. This one I love and I hope you enjoy it too! Please send feedback about this cheese, it's the first time we have featured it!


From Red Hen Baking Co. we have Cyrus Pringle bread, made entirely with VT grown wheat flours. Randy developed this delicious bread in 2009 following Tom Kenyon's (Aurora Farm, Charlotte) first successful harvest of a hard red winter wheat variety required for bread making. He has modified the bread a little since he first baked it, adding a little of Ben Gleason's whole wheat for a better flavor profile. Both the Aurora Farm organic white flour and a sifted version of Ben Gleason's whole wheat flour have been included in your shares this summer. The bread is named after Cyrus Pringle, a reknowned wheat breeder who lived and farmed in Charlotte in the late 1800s. The wheat varieties that he developed for our region are becoming popular again today with farmers who are returning to growing wheat locally..


Eggs again this week too from Pa Pa Doodles Farm!



Recipes


Simple Baked Sugar Dumpling Squash
Preheat oven to 350ºF.
Cut the squash in half, and remove the seeds and extra bits with a spoon. Turn upside down, and poke some holes in the skin with a fork. Turn it back over, and place each half into a baking dish filled with an inch or so of water.


In each squash half, put the following ingredients, sprinkling spices on the top edge, too:


1 tablespoon pure maple syrup


1/2 teaspoon cinnamon


1/8 teaspoon nutmeg


1/2 tablespoon butter


1 teaspoon brown sugar or maple sugar


Bake uncovered on the middle oven rack for 40-45 minutes, or until tender.


Quick Moroccan Vegetable Couscous
Bon Appétit January 1996. Serves 2 but can be doubled.

1/3 cup sliced almonds
1 tablespoon olive oil
3 cups mixed cup-up vegetables (such as red onion, carrots, cauliflower or broccoli)
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 cup dry white wine
1/3 cup golden raisins (or chopped apples)
3/4 cup vegetable broth

1/3 cup sliced almonds

One 5- to 7-ounce box couscous and lentil mix or other couscous blend

Place almonds in heavy medium skillet. Stir over medium heat until almonds are pale golden, about 4 minutes. Transfer almonds to bowl. Add oil to same skillet.Increase heat to medium-high. Add vegetables, cumin and coriander; sauté until vegetables just begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add wine and raisins. Boil until wine is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Add broth. Partially cover skillet; simmer until vegetables are tender, about 6 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
Meanwhile, prepare couscous according to package directions.

Mound couscous on platter. Spoon vegetable topping and juices over. Sprinkle with almonds and serve.


Mixed Vegetable Curry - Sabzi Bhaji

2 large potatoes, cut into thin julienne strips
2 carrots, cut into julienne strips
1 onion, finely chopped
1/2 to 1 cayenne pepper, seeded and finally chopped
1 tablespoon of ground coriander
1 teaspoon of turmeric
1/2 teaspoon of cayenne
dash of amchoor powder (if you have it)
dash of mace (if you have it)
1 teaspoon of sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper

2 tablespoons of ghee, or a mixture of butter and oil
1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped or grated
1 teaspoon of cumin seeds
1 large tomato, finely chopped
1 cup of caluliflower or broccoli or chopped beet greens
a generous handful of freshcoriander, chopped
2/3 cup of plain yogurt
juice of 1 fresh lemon
1/2 cup of water
1 tablespoon of chickpea flour (optional)

In a medium bowl, combine the potatoes, carrots, onions, chillies, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, amchoor powder, mace, salt and black pepper. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit for an hour.

Heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan over medium heat. When hot, toss in the ginger, cumin seeds. Stir and fry for a few minutes. Add the potato and carrot mixture to the pan and cook for a few minutes, stirring often. Add your cauliflower or other green veggies now along with the tomato, lemon juice and most of the freshly chopped cilantro. Cook, stirring often, for another 5 minutes. Gradually stir in the yogurt and add 1/2 cup of water. Cover and cook for 30 - 40 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Add more water if necessary to achieve your desired consistency or a bit of chickpea flour if the dish has excess water. Garnish with the remaining cilantro or add to the cooking pot and stir.


Beet Greens and Potato Frittata

2 cups finely chopped potatoes (about 1 pound)

1 cup chopped beet greens

1/3 cup fat-free milk

2 tablespoons grated fresh Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

6 large eggs

1 teaspoon butter

1/3 cup (about 1 1/2 ounces) shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese

4 beet green leaves, optional

Preheat broiler.

Place potatoes in a medium saucepan, and cover with water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer for 8 minutes. Add chopped beet greens; cook 2 minutes or until tender. Drain.

Combine milk and the next 5 ingredients (milk through egg whites) in a large bowl, and stir with a whisk. Stir in potato mixture. Oil a skillet. Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat, and tilt to coat pan. Pour the egg mixture into skillet; cook 15 minutes or until top is just set. Sprinkle with mozzarella.

Wrap handle of skillet with foil; broil 5 minutes or until golden brown. Garnish with beet green leaves, if desired.


Good Eats Newsletter - September 21, 2011

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:


Mesclun! (greens are back!)

Napa Cabbage; Fennel; Bunched Kale; Mixed Potatoes; Carmen Red Peppers; Jalapeno Peppers; Carrots; Broccoli; Mixed Snap beans plus....

Pie Pumpkin



Localvore Offerings Include:

Champlain Orchards Cortland Apples

Golden Crops Quebec Organic Rolled Oats

Fat Toad Goat's Milk Caramel


Pete's Musings

Fall work is clicking along. Greenhouses will be transplanted with baby chard, head lettuce, parsley, pac choi and more this afternoon. Baby greens are being seeded in greenhouses every couple days for a steady fall supply. Onions are drying very nicely on our sun porch and potatoes are well over 1/2 dug. We are appreciating our new building and using a forklift to move bins of potatoes and other roots. In the past there was alot of double and triple lifting of these crops.

We are very pleased with our frozen good preparation for the winter CSA. A real highlight is the gold watermelon juice from High Mowing Seeds melons that we froze last week. Also we have put up a couple thousand quarts of tomato puree and sauce which will be a treasure this winter. A very good looking crop of sweet potatoes will be coming in later this week. ~ Pete


Storage and Use Tips

Pie Pumpkins -

Many people consider pumpkins to be the essence of fall, reminding them of crisp falling leaves, cool evenings and the approaching holidays. Any pumpkin recipe can be a source of comfort and warmth, but be sure to use the correct type of pumpkin to achieve a richly flavored result. Pie pumpkins are not only smaller than jack-o-lantern type pumpkins but they also have a denser flesh and more sugars that make their edible quality much more like winter squash. Most pumpkins in fact are in the same family of plants as winter squash such as: delicata squash, acorn squash, and dumpling squash and can be used similarly in pies, soups, breads even pancakes! Check out our recipes below for some tips on how to prepare. Pie pumpkins are an excellent source of beta carotene, calcium and potassium. Store all winter squash and pumpkins in a cool, dry, dark place with good ventilation, like a porch or garage, but make sure they do not freeze, around 55F is perfect. They should last over a month for decoration but use within a month for best flavor quality. Once cut, you can wrap the leftovers in plastic and store in the refrigerator for 5 to 7 days.


Napa Cabbage - Need something to wrap, wok or roll? Napa cabbage is an Asian vegetable that resembles regular green cabbage, but is longer and oval-shaped. Napa cabbage has slightly more protein and fewer calories than regular cabbage and a unique taste like a mild celery or bok choy. It is delicious raw or cooked, and can be substituted for regular cabbage in most recipes. It is extremely popular in China partly because of its versatility. In Korea it is pickled, salted, and flavored with ginger and chili peppers to make Korea's national dish kim chi. Store in a sealed plastic bag in your refrigerator for 2-3 weeks.


Carmen Red Peppers - The gorgeous long red peppers are just about my favorite thing this time of year. These are sweet reds, not hot, and they are GREAT for making roasted stuffed peppers. See recipe suggestion below.



Good Eats Fall/Winter Share

Sign Up Now to Reserve Your Share!


Are you ready for winter? We will have such a great share this year. Pete is planting the greenhouses with baby greens now and getting succession crops lined up to keep us all in something green in the weeks and months ahead. We have preserved an amazing abundance of summer crops in the last month and we'll be doling out this summer goodness all winter long.


The Fall/Winter Veggie Only Share is designed to give you something fresh and green each week as well as a selection of stored, frozen or processed crops from the summer. We'll have a mix of summer and fall vegetables into November. Hardy greens and some other cold tolerant field crops will be included well into December, and then the later weeks of the share will feature more storage favorites like potatoes, carrots, onions, winter squash and cabbages along with the our winter greens mix and frozen summer goodies. Our newly re-assembled on-farm kitchen has allowed us to process and freeze many items for the winter veggie share like corn, cauliflower, tomatoes, peppers ... and even watermelon (yes watermelon!).

Join the Localvore Share and, in addition to your vegetables, receive eggs, cheeses, staples and other locally produced value added products from Pete's Greens and other great businessees around the area.

And for the kind hearted carnivores out there check out our Fall/Winter Meat Share including Pete's Pastured meats and sustainably produced meats and seafood from the area.


Check our website for more details about Fall/Winter Share details, pricing, pick-up locations and sign up information.


Vermont Farm Fund Awards $35,000 in Emergency Loans to Farms


This is exciting news. The Vermont Farm Fund has finally awarded its first emergency loans, sending checks to four farms devastated by Hurricane Irene. Kingsbury Market Garden, Westminster Organics, and Jericho Settlers Farm will each receive a 0% loan of $10,000, and the smaller Little Village Farm will receive a $5000 loan. These loans were given quickly, with flexible terms working with the needs of each farm, so that each farm had some money to work with to get back on track.

From Aaron Locker, co-owner of Kingsbury Market Garden:

The first substantial relief money that we received after the flood was from the Vermont Farm Fund. In less than a week after applying for $5,000 we received word that the money would soon be in our bank account. When the fund increased their maximum loans to $10,000 total, we requested and received another $5,000. While I expect to receive relief money from other sources, the Vermont Farm Fund enabled us to get to work quickly rebuilding our existing soil so that we are in the best shape we can be for the 2012 growing season.


Little Village Farm lost all of their crops and needed to purchase soil amendments to cover crop and nourish their flood damaged fields for next year. As a small, new farm they will probably not be a candidate for FEMA or VEDA funding. The loan that the Vermont Farm Fund was able to provide was the perfect size to allow them to move forward.

Jericho Settlers Farm lost storage crops that were integral to their Fall Share and that will have a large impact on their Fall income and ability to meet financial obligations. They had begun building a larger cooler addition on their farm to store crops and were facing a cash shortage with regard to completing construction. The Vermont Farm Fund loan will allow them to finish building and planning for next year.

The beauty of this program is the revolving nature of the fund. When our farm was in trouble we received donations which we have begun to pay back into this fund. These farms will pay their loans back as they get back on track and they may encourage others to give to and support the VFF. As this pool of funds grows, the VFF will be able to continue to offer support to farms in need.


The advisory board is reviewing more applications now and we expect that more loans will be given in the coming weeks.

Many thanks to the members of the Board and to Elena and Monty at the Center for an Agricultural Economy for helping to make this all happen so quickly!


To learn more about the Vermont Farm Fund or to support Vermont Farms now, please visit our Vermont Farm Fund page or the Center for an Agricultural Economy's website.

Donations can be mailed to:

Vermont Farm Fund
Center for an Agricultural Economy
PO Box 451
41 S. Main St.
Hardwick, VT 05843



Changes to Your Delivery?

If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let me know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or I can stop your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.



Localvore Lore


Cortland Apples.... another delicious variety of delicious apples from Champlain Orchards. This all purpose apple was developed by crossing a MacIntoch and the Ben Davis variety. It was bred at the NY State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, NY in 1898 and named after nearby Cortland County. Cortland apples are crimson red with a little bit of light green background showing. They are sweet and juicy with a hint of tartness. They are good for fresh eating, salads, sauce, pies and baking. The snow-white flesh is also a favorite for fruit plates and garnishes because it does not turn brown very quickly.


Localvores will also receive a 5 lb bag of Golden Crops Rolled Oats from organic grower Michel Gaudreau and Golden Crops Mill, across the border in Quebec. This is the second serving of these oats this share. Michel grows quite a few different grains on his farm and mills grains for organic growers in his area. He has a great operation in a beautiful setting surrounded by his fields. Michel's Golden Crops Mill makes many organic grains available locally that we might not otherwise have local access to and we are grateful for his commitment. These are beautiful, clean organic rolled oats ideal for oatmeal, granola, cookies, streusel toppings etc. Click here for either a solid granola recipe or one for oatmeal.


Are you ready for a real treat? Fat Toad Goat's Milk Caramel or Cajeta as it is traditionally called is as good as it gets. Cajeta is very similar to the ever popular dulce de leche, a dairy based confection that uses cow’s milk. Cajeta, on the other hand has its roots in Mexico and is based on goat’s milk. Fat Toad Farm, a small family farm, is run by Judith Irving, Steve Reid and Calley Hastings. The family has spent several years building a high quality certified Alpine and Saanen goat herd producing fresh goat cheese and goat’s milk caramel (cajeta). "We hand-stir fresh goat milk and organic cane sugar over the stove for about four hours. During this time, the sugars in the milk and the sugar caramelize and produce the most incredible sweet and tasty caramel sauce. Rest assured that a lot of deep thinking and bad singing to the blasting boom box go into this caramel!"



Recipes


Quick Kim Chi Taken from She Knows Food & Recipes

Kimchi is a spicy Korean side-dish, sort of like the hottest cole slaw you’ve ever eaten. Traditional kimchi can take several days to make. However, for a quick at-home version, combine a few cups of chopped napa cabbage, a tablespoon of chopped hot peppers, 3 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar, 4 sliced cloves of garlic, and a healthy pinch of salt. Stir well, chill overnight and then eat right out of the bowl!


Quick Napa Cabbage Rolls Taken from She Knows Food & Recipes

Instead of using green cabbage, try some of the larger outer leaves of napa cabbage. Cut them in half and steam or boil them until they just turn soft and then fill with a mixture of cooked white rice and browned mild sausage or hamburger. Top with tomato sauce and bake until bubbly.


Stuffed Peppers

These beautiful peppers are an opportunity for a delightful dinner. No need for a recipe, just use your imagination. You won't go wrong.

Preheat oven to 400F.

Saute some onions and garlic, and add in some cooked rice, some cooked beans (canned kidney beans come in handy here!), some spices. Once everything is cooked and blended add some cheese (parm perhaps, or gruyere, or feta or goat). Spoon the filling into peppers that are cut in half and place peppers into an oiled baking dish.

Bake for 30 mins or more until peppers are softened and beginning to brown on some edges and filling is hot.


Old Fashioned Pumpkin Pie Filling
The most important step when making a pumpkin pie (or other recipe that calls for pumpkin) with fresh, rather than canned, pumpkin is to to use a pie pumpkin. These pumpkins are small and bred to have dense, sweet flesh, unlike Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins with flesh that is stringy and tasteless.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Wash the pumpkin rind and cut the pumpkin in half. Scoop out all of the seeds and strings. Place the pumpkin halves cut-side down in a rimmed baking pan. Add about ½ inch of water to the pan and then place it in the oven. Bake the pumpkin for about 30 minutes and then flip to cut side up, add a dollop of butter, maple syrup or honey if desired and cook for another 15 minutes or so, until it is soft when peirced with a fork or knife.

Remove the pumpkin from the oven and set it aside for about 30 minutes or until it is cool enough to handle. Then, scoop out the flesh out of the rind. Place the flesh into a blender or food processor and puree until it is very smooth.
 If you want extra smooth pumpkin puree, first run the pumpkin flesh through a food mill, then process it in a blender or food processor.


You can refrigerate the pumpkin puree for up to a week or you can freeze it for later use. To freeze, pour the pumpkin into ½ quart plastic freezer bags, leaving ½ inch of headroom at the top of the bag. Seal the bag, being sure to squeeze as much air out of the bag as possible. Lay the bag flat on a freezer shelf and freeze. Once the puree is solid you can stack the bags wherever you like in the freezer. Use the frozen puree within one year.


Baked Apples and Goat's Milk Caramel Taken from Fat Toad Recipes

One of the simplest and most gratifying ways to eat our caramel! This is a perfect warming fall dish best served with vanilla ice cream.

4 Apples
4 teaspoons butter
1 jar Fat Toad Farm Caramel
Cinnamon and Nutmeg to taste

Preheat oven to 350F. Core 4 apples leaving the peel on. Place in 8X8 baking pan. Put a dollop of butter in core center of each apple. Bake at 350F for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Pour caramel in the center and drizzle on top. Sprinkle cinnamon and nutmeg on top. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream!


Apple Crisp

Everyone loves apple crisp! This is a basic recipe you can use for any fruit type.

3 lbs tart apples peeled, cored and sliced


2 tbs lemon juice


1/2 cup light brown sugar (pack it tightly)


1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
1/3 cup all-purpose flour


1/3 cup granulated sugar


1/3 cup rolled oats


4 tbs of cold butter (Half stick)


1/2 cup hopped walnuts or pecans (optional)

Grab two bowls. In one bowl, add the apples and lemon juice. In the other bowl, combine the brown sugar, nutmeg, and cinnamon, mix sugar mixture in with apples and lemon juice. Mix the flour, sugar, and oats. Slice the butter into small pieces. Use two forks to mix the the flour and butter until it looks crumbly. Add the chopped nuts. 



Preheat oven to 375F. Spread apple mixture into a 9x9 baking dish. Top it off with the crumbly oat mixture. Bake for 30 - 45 minutes at 375F, or until the apples are soft and topping is browned slightly. Drizzle Fat Toad Goat's Milk Caramel on top and serve with vanilla ice cream!



Monday, September 19, 2011

Good Eats Newsletter - September 14, 2011

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
Nicola Potatoes; Purple Top Turnips; Green or Savoy Cabbage; Mini Bell Peppers; Sunshine Squash; Yellow Storage Onions; Sugar Beet Greens; Carrots; Bunch of Kohlrabi; and Cilantro....


Localvore Offerings Include:
Pizza Dough
Pete's Greens Tomato Sauce
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs



On the Farm
It is full on harvest season around here! Last week we put up many quarts of tomato puree and tomato sauce for winter Good Eats shares. Yesterday some of the crew were cutting corn off the cobs which will be frozen for winter shares. We'll have loads of sweet peppers to freeze this week and next. There are crates and crates of onions drying, and the Steve and Pete are now deep into potato harvest too. The next couple of weeks will be all hands on deck to get critical crops out of the ground.

The barn construction continues and Isaac will begin to get doors and windows in place soon, which will make our new building feel more finished. Pete finally made the decision on cooling equipment and installation of compressors and evaporators will begin soon for the big walk in and freezer. This just in the nick of time really, because we will need the storage cooler when the big harvests of beets, turnips, carrots and the rest come in. We have been getting by with a smaller packing cooler we built in the building. Over the last couple of months, we rented a big freezer in order to put up crops from the field, and it is becoming quite full! It will be great to get into the new freezer and be able to organize our product for easier retrieval.

No greens again this week but they are nearly ready. When the Black River flooded during Irene,we lost the field of produce from which our current harvests of baby greens were coming. We lost other crops as well, but the greens we are sorely missing right about now! New plantings are nearly there, thanks for your patience!

The volunteer and fundraising efforts continue across the state for those who lost so much to flooding. Our Vermont Farm Fund is growing as donors step up to help farmers who have been affected by Irene flooding. With more funds available we have been able to increase the max loan size to $10,000. We expect to be sending out checks to the first recipients this week! I am looking forward to a Phish benefit concert tomorrow night that aims to raise a good chunk for the Vermont Community Fund's various relief funds. NOFA-VTs Farmer Emergency Fund is also active in the relief effort (they will be holding an on line auction Oct 1) along with many other non profits throughout the state. Give where you can. Volunteer. Every little bit helps. ~ Amy


Storage and Use Tips

Sunshine Winter Squash - The squash variety in the share is Sunshine and like other winter squash, it can be baked, braised, pureed, or steamed to be served as a side dish or used as a base for soups. Store all winter squash in a cool, dry, dark place with good ventilation, like a porch or garage, but make sure they do not freeze. They should last over a month at least. Once cut, you can wrap the leftovers in plastic and store in the refrigerator for 5 to 7 days.

Kohlrabi - The name means cabbage turnip in German and that is a pretty accurate description. It is a member of the cabbage family and its outer skin would attest to that. The greens look more like turnip greens however and the inner bulb can be a bit fibrous, like turnip. Raw, it is crisp, sweet, and clean, strikingly reminiscent of raw broccoli stalks. Cooked, it touts a mild, nutty, cabbage-like flavor that adapts beautifully to many cooking styles. It can be eaten raw and is great in salads and slaws. It can also be boiled, steamed, baked, roasted, etc. The greens may be eaten cooked like turnip greens or any other cooked greens. To prepare the bulb, cut off the leaves and stems. Use a vegetable peeler to pare off the tough outer layer. Or use a chefs knife to slice it off. Dice or shave up the inner bulb according to your recipe. Store loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge.

Good Eats Fall/Winter Share

Sign Up Now to Reserve Your Share!

Are you ready for winter? We have been working hard here all summer in order to bring you a fabulous selection of Vermont's best winter produce and food staples to keep you healthy and happy through the darkest days of the year.

The Fall/Winter Veggie Only Share is designed to give you something fresh and green each week as well as a selection of stored, frozen or processed crops from the summer. Our newly re-assembled on-farm kitchen has allowed us to process and freeze many items for the winter veggie share like corn, cauliflower, tomatoes, peppers, spinach and maybe even watermelon (yes watermelon!). We'll have a mix of summer and fall vegetables into November. Hardy greens and some other cold tolerant field crops will be included well into December, and then the later weeks of the share will feature more storage favorites like potatoes, carrots, onions, winter squash and cabbages along with the our winter greens mix and frozen summer goodies. Join the Localvore Share and, in addition to your vegetables, receive eggs, cheeses, staples and other locally produced value added products from Pete's Greens and other great businessees around the area. And for the kind hearted carnivores out there check out our Fall/Winter Meat Share including Pete's Pastured meats and sustainably produced meats and seafood from the area.

Check our website for more details about Fall/Winter Share details, pricing, pick-up locations and sign up information.

Changes to Your Delivery?
If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let me know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or I can stop your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.


Localvore Lore

Pizza dough from
On the Rise Bakery again this week. They make this version of their dough especially for Good Eats with VT sunflower oil, Milanaise unbleached white flour, Ben Gleason's whole wheat flour, local honey and sea salt. The pizza dough will come to you frozen. Put it right back into your freezer if you don't plan to use it Wednesday night. When you do use it, thaw it, and don't wait for it to rise. When it is thawed it is ready to stretch and top and bake. As pizza dough sits, thawed, either on the counter or in the fridge, the live yeast in the dough continues to work away and the dough will lose elasticity steadily. If you haven't used it 48 hrs later, the risk is not that the dough will go bad, it's that it will lose elasticity, and become more difficult to work with, it will tear more easily. In this case, you may be better off using your rolling pin to roll out the dough rather than trying to get away with stretching spinning pizza doughs above your head. Ben posted the instructions on line along with some instructional videos that you can watch for technique and inspiration. If you make a great looking or great tasting pizza that you are pleased with, email a photo along to Ben or post it to the On the Rise Facebook page.

Our Tomato Sauce is made with organic tomatoes, onions, fennel, garlic, sunflower oil, basil, oregano, thyme, salt and black pepper. We are excited for you to try it this week on pizza or pasta! This is one we'd love feedback on so I'll be sending a survey later this week in hopes you all will comment.

We have eggs again this week from Pa Pa Doodles Farm.

Recipes

Quinoa with Moroccan Winter Squash and Carrot

Really delicious and easy and HEALTHY recipe from Bon Appetit. A can of chick peas would be a great addition for a very complete and tasty meal.

Stew
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
3 garlic cloves, chopped
2 teaspoons Hungarian sweet paprika
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Pinch of saffron
1 cup water
2 cups diced tomatoes, drained
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 cups 1-inch cubes peeled winter squash
2 cups 3/4-inch cubes peeled carrots

Quinoa
1 cup quinoa*
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup finely chopped peeled carrot
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
2 cups water
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided
2 teaspoons chopped fresh mint, divided

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion; sauté until soft, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add garlic; stir 1 minute. Mix in paprika and next 8 ingredients. Add 1 cup water, tomatoes, and lemon juice. Bring to boil. Add squash and carrots. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.)

Rinse quinoa; drain. Melt butter with oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and carrot. Cover; cook until vegetables begin to brown, stirring often, about 10 minutes. Add garlic, salt, and turmeric; sauté 1 minute. Add quinoa; stir 1 minute. Add 2 cups water. Bring to boil; reduce heat to medium-low. Cover; simmer until liquid is absorbed and quinoa is tender, about 15 minutes.

Rewarm stew. Stir in half of cilantro and half of mint. Spoon quinoa onto platter, forming well in center. Spoon stew into well. Sprinkle remaining herbs over.



Savoy Slaw with Mint and Cilantro
If you have a food processor, here's a quick easy slaw to throw together. The original recipe in Bon Appetit called for Daikon radish in place of the kohlrabi and that would add a nice bite, as would other radishes.

6 cups thinly sliced savoy cabbage
1 cup coarsely grated peeled carrots
1 cup coarsely grated kohlrabi
1 large red bell pepper, cut into 2 x 1/3-inch strips (about 2 cups)
1/2 cup chopped fresh mint
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
4 green onions, sliced
7 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
2 tablespoons Asian sesame oil
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 serrano chiles, seeded, minced

Combine first 7 ingredients in large bowl. Whisk vinegar, sesame oil, vegetable oil, and chiles in medium bowl. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Vegetables and dressing can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover separately and chill.
Drizzle dressing over salad and toss to coat evenly. Season salad to taste with salt and pepper and serve.


Braised Kohlrabi
Braising kohlrabi in white wine really brings out the sweetness of this vegetable. Makes a wonderful accompaniment to grilled chicken or fish.


1.5 lb. kohlrabi, peeled and chopped into 1 pieces
2 garlic scapes, chopped into 1/4 pieces
2 TB butter
1.5 teaspoon fresh tarragon, finely chopped (or 1/2 teaspoon dried, crumbled)
salt & pepper to taste
1/4 cup white wine
chopped fresh parsley

Melt butter in a medium-sized skillet set over medium heat. Add the kohlrabi, scapes, tarragon, salt and pepper, and toss to coat with butter. Pour in white wine. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover. Continue to cook, adjusting heat to keep pan contents at a slow simmer, approximately 10-15 minutes, until slightly tender. Uncover and turn the heat up a bit. Cook until the kohlrabi is slightly colored. Remove from heat and transfer to serving dish. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.


Roasted Turnips and Greens
Here's a recipe in which you can use your beet greens and kohlrabi greens in a wonderful flavorful dish. Though I love hazelnuts, I rarely have them in the cupboard. For this recipe I might stop to pick some up. Walnuts will do nicely too.

1/4 cup pitted kalamata olives
1 navel orange, plus 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
2 pounds young turnips and their greens—turnips halved, greens stemmed and chopped
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 cup water
2 cups beet greens or other greens
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons chopped hazelnuts

Preheat the oven to 400°. In a mini food processor, puree the olives; transfer to a bowl. Using a sharp knife, peel the orange, removing all of the bitter white pith. Working over another bowl, cut in between the membranes to release the sections.

On a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle the turnips with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, until almost tender. Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the water and greens, cover and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the greens are just tender, 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the orange juice over the turnips. Roast for 5 minutes longer, until the turnips are tender and glazed; season with salt. Drizzle the pureed olives onto a platter. Top with the turnips, greens, orange sections and hazelnuts. Serve hot or warm.

Skillet Turnips and Potatoes with Bacon
Add some of Deb's fried eggs on the side and you have got dinner or breakfast!

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
8 ounces thick-cut bacon slices, cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
4 large garlic cloves, peeled, crushed
1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 1/2 pounds white-skinned potatoes, peeled, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh Italian parsley

Mix 1/4 cup water, vinegar, and sugar in small bowl. Combine oil and bacon in heavy large skillet; sauté over medium-high heat until fat is rendered, 3 to 4 minutes. Add onion and garlic; sauté until onion is golden, about 5 minutes. Add turnips and potatoes; sprinkle with 1 teaspoon sea salt and toss 5 minutes. Reduce heat to mediumlow, cover, and cook until vegetables are almost tender, stirring and turning vegetables occasionally, about 15 minutes.

Push vegetables to 1 side of skillet. Pour vinegar mixture into cleared space. Toss vegetables with vinegar mixture. Spread vegetables in even layer in skillet; cook until golden and slightly crisp on bottom, about 4 minutes. Turn vegetables over; spread in even layer and cook until browned and slightly crisp on bottom, about 4 minutes. Continue to turn, spread, and cook vegetables until tender, golden, and crisp around edges, 7 to 8 minutes longer. Season with more sea salt and black pepper. Transfer to bowl. Sprinkle with parsley.

Good Eats Newsletter-September 7, 2011

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
Mixed Potatoes; Garlic; Dill; Green Peppers; Cayenne Peppers; Eggplant; Celery; Head Lettuce; Artichoke, Bright Lights Chard or Bunched Dandelion Greens; Walla Walla Sweet Onion....

and Cauliflower (Romanesco, Cheddar or White!)


Localvore Offerings Include:
Elmore Mountain Whole Wheat Sour Dough Bread
Jasper Hill's Bailey Hazen Blue Cheese
Champlain Orchard's Gala Apples


Pete's Musings
It's been an interesting week in the Vermont vegetable farming world, post Irene. At Pete's Greens we lost 6 acres of vegetables to the storm-baby greens, fall cabbage and cauliflower, broccoli, fennel and a few other odds and ends. We have one field that borders the Black River and I think we'll probably put it into pasture and not raise vegetables there in the future. But our losses were relatively minor compared to some farms in the State. I visited Dog River farm in Berlin on Saturday where nearly everything went underwater and the story from Harlow Farm in Westminster to the Intervale in Burlington is similar. Lots of flooded crops and a confusing process to decide whether any flooded crops can be sold.

Sorry we don't have any baby greens again this week. It is looking like they will be back next week though the strong thunderstorms and brief hail we experienced yesterday and rain the past 18 hours have not helped.

The Vermont Farm Fund, a cooperative venture of Pete's Greens and the Center for Agricultural Economy, is offering interest free loans to farms that were hurt by Irene. Learn about the Fund and consider making a donation at our website.

Thanks for doing your best to support businesses hurt by the flooding. Farms, stores, restaurants - many have suffered and the best support is helping them to clean up and being a loyal customer. ~ Pete

Prepping for Good Eats Packing Tuesday

Storage and Use Tips

Dill - Dill is a tasty addition to dips, dressings, sauces and soups. Dill is an easy herb to preserve and use throughout the winter. The best way to dry this herb is to use a de-dehydrator set 95-105F for 1-3 hours. At these temperatures the most amount of aromatic compounds are preserved. Of coarse if you do not have a dehydrator (I don't) you can always use the oven. I use baking sheets and lay the dill single layered on the sheet and make one layer in the oven. I use the lowest setting, usually 200-225F and stick a wooden spoon in the door to reduce the temperature. It usually takes around 10-20 minutes depending on the humidity level in the air. The dill should be dry and brittle when completely dry. I strip off any large stems and then put in the food processor to chop or use a mortar and pestel. Store in air tight jars or sealed plastic bags for an extended amount of time.

Garlic - This week's garlic Comes from Bob and Cindy Maynard's farm Green Mountain Garlic in Waterbury, VT. It is a mix of German Extra Hardy and Music. Both of these are Porcelain types and some may say they are actually the same variety. In essence there are 9 main genetically different strains of garlic, the various varieties out there are more than likely variations of the same strain grown under different conditions. Perhaps you will be able to tell the difference. This garlic is fresh garlic and has not been cured for long term storage. There are many ways to store garlic, fresh garlic is best stored in the butter compartment of your fridge for 1-2 weeks, if left in the open section of your fridge for an extended period it will probably sprout. You can also keep in a dry, dark place, a paper bag usually works well, but do not forget about it. You can also make dried garlic or garlic powder using a dehydrator. Cut garlic into thin slices and dehydrate at recommended temperature, reconstitute dry slices in warm liquid or crush in food processor. If you go through lots of garlic in your household, you can stock (including seed garlic) by ordering through their website.

Artichoke -Artichokes are a member of the aster family of flowers. The globe artichoke is delicious but it is also rated one of the top vegetables for health. It is low in calories but delivers significant fiber, protein magnesium and potassium content. But most importantly it contains many different antioxidants, all with different health supporting attributes. It's particularly good at aiding liver function and easing digestion. If you have never prepared and artichoke, there's a bit of a process but it's fun, and they are pretty easy once you get started. See the recipe section for tips. Store your artichokes in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to a week.

Dandelion Greens - Yes this is the same old dandelion that you have had in your yard all summer long. This particular variety has been bred to have long, large emerald green leaves that can be used as a salad green when young or as a braising green when older. Dandelion is in the chicory family and has the same bitter flavor that most endives are known for. As a baby green, it has not yet developed this flavor but as the plant matures the bitter compounds are accentuated. In order to fully appreciate the dandelion green it is important to cook them in a small portion of salted water separately from all other ingredients, strain and season to taste. Then again you can add it to other dishes as you would any other cooking green, they will just have a stronger flavor than say, spinach. Greens should be bagged and stored in the fridge for 7-10 days.

Cayenne peppers - Cayenne pepper also known as cow-horn pepper, aleva, bird pepper or in its powdered form simply as red pepper is a red hot chili pepper used to flavor dishes. The fruits are generally dried and ground. There are many ways to dry cayenne peppers. The fastest and most effective way is to use a dehydrator or an oven. You can dry the peppers whole or cut them lengthwise and remove the seeds. The seeds and the white ridges that hold the seeds in place have the highest amount of capsacin which is the compound that makes hot peppers hot. By removing these from the pepper you will reduce the heat, but be careful as the capsacin oil will quickly adhere to your skin and become irritating. Cayenne peppers can also be dried outside in the sun. Simply lay them on a flat surface and be sure to protect from moist cool conditions. The simplest way and my favorite is to simply string with a thread and needle throughout the stem and hang in your kitchen. It may take a few days or a week to completely dry or longer in humid conditions. Dried peppers can be stored for years under dry conditions but best used within a season.

Good Eats Fall/Winter Share

Sign Up Now to Reserve Your Share!

Are you ready for winter? We have been working hard here all summer in order to bring you a fabulous selection of Vermont's best winter produce and food staples to keep you healthy and happy through the darkest days of the year.

The Fall/Winter Veggie Only Share is designed to give you something fresh and green each week as well as a selection of stored, frozen or processed crops from the summer. Our newly re-assembled on-farm kitchen has allowed us to process and freeze many items for the winter veggie share like corn, cauliflower, tomatoes, peppers, spinach and maybe even watermelon (yes watermelon!). We'll have a mix of summer and fall vegetables into November. Hardy greens and some other cold tolerant field crops will be included well into December, and then the later weeks of the share will feature more storage favorites like potatoes, carrots, onions, winter squash and cabbages along with the our winter greens mix and frozen summer goodies. Join the Localvore Share and, in addition to your vegetables, receive eggs, cheeses, staples and other locally produced value added products from Pete's Greens and other great businesses around the area. And for the kind hearted carnivores out there check out our Fall/Winter Meat Share including Pete's Pastured meats and sustainably produced meats and seafood from the area.

Check our website for more details about Fall/Winter Share details, pricing, pick-up locations and sign up information.

Changes to Your Delivery?
If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let me know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or I can stop your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.

Localvore Lore

For this week's share Blair and Andrew from Elmore Mountain Bread are trying something new, it is a 70/30 Whole Wheat Sourdough loaf. Andrew says "This summer we attended the Kneading Conference in Maine, where we got to meet many other bread bakers. The conference focused on baking good bread, especially using natural leavening, local wheat, whole grains and wood fired ovens. I was inspired by other bakers to make a whole wheat loaf that is hearty and flavorful, but not heavy and sour. We came up with a 70/30 bread that is made with 70% Milanaise whole wheat, 30% Milanaise white winter blend, spring water, sourdough and sea salt."

In case you have forgotten how good Jasper Hill Farm's Bayley Hazen Blue is, you are in for a real treat. After being unavailable to Good Eats for over one year (their production was maxed) we are happy to offer this special treat once again. This cheese receives regular rave reviews like this one from Cynthia Zarin who described Bayley Hazen Blue for the New Yorker Magazine this way “It was tangy, sweet, creamy, velvet on the tongue, the most delicious blue cheese I’d ever tasted." Bayley Hazen Blue is named after a road running through the Northeast Kingdom. The road was built and named after two Revolutionary War generals Bayley and Hazen, who were stationed along the Canadian Front. Jasper Hill summarizes this delicious cheese as follows. "The paste of a Bayley Hazen is drier than most blues and the penicillium roqueforti takes a back seat to an array of flavors that hint at nuts and grasses and in the odd batch, licorice. Though drier and crumblier than most blues, its texture reminds one of chocolate and butter."

We are very excited to be able to provide Gala apples from Vermont's very own Champlain Orchards in Shoreham. Gala apples in general are excellent for fresh eating and baking. They have a firm, crisp flesh and honey sweet flavor. It is almost impossible to produce commercial apples organically due to the pest and disease issues present in our region. Champlain Orchards grows what they call "apples with a conscience" using integrated pest and disease management as much as possible.

Meat Share

Have you ever had Applecheek Farm's Pasture Raised Veal Andouille? Well here is your opportunity to try some of the best tasting veal product available and ethically produced to boot. Pasture raised veal calves are raised alongside their mothers in open pasture, under the sun and with access to clean air and fresh water before they are brought to harvest at about the same time lambs are traditionally slaughtered. Thanks to the renaissance of truly traditional and sustainable farming practices humanely raised veal is increasing in availability. The sausages have a nice amount of pep and as a fully smoked product you can enjoy them hot or cold.

This week's share also brings you North Hollow Farm's Grassfed Strip Steak. Strip steak is a cut of beef cut from the short loin, and consists of a muscle that does little work, and so it is particularly tender, though not as tender as the nearby rib eye or tenderloin. When still attached to the bone the strip steak becomes a T-bone or Porterhouse. Strip steaks have an intermediate amount of fat and can be replaced for rib eye, tenderloin, t-bone or porterhouse steaks in most recipes.

Also included are Pete's Pastured Whole Chicken, Pete's Hot Italian Sausage, and Maplewind Farm Sandwich Steak or Stew Beef. This week half the sites will get sandwich steak and the other half Maplewind stew beef (the reverese of what you received last month).

Recipes

Dandelion Greens
Cooked and sauteed with chopped onion, minced garlic, chile pepper


1 pound dandelion greens
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 whole small dried hot chile pepper, seeds removed, crushed
1/4 cup sunflower oil (or another cooking oil)
salt and pepper

Wash greens well, cut leaves into 2-inch pieces. Cook greens uncovered in small amount of salted water until tender, about 10 minutes. Sauté onion, garlic, and chile pepper in sunflower oil. Drain greens and add to onion, garlic and pepper mixture. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Recipe for dandelion greens serves 4.


Steamed Artichokes
The simplicity of the steamed artichoke makes this an everyday delicacy. It pairs perfectly with drawn butter or your favorite dipping sauce.

1 large artichokes
1/4 tsp. kosher salt

Bring 1" of water to a boil over high heat in a saucepan. Place a small rack or steaming basket in bottom of pot. Using a serrated-blade knife, cut off the stems of the artichokes so that they sit flat. Cut off top third of artichokes. Using kitchen shears, trim the pointed tops from the leaves. Transfer artichokes to the saucepan and sprinkle with salt, cover and steam over medium-high heat until tender, about 40 minutes. Serve with drawn butter or your favorite dipping sauce, if you like.


Andouille Sausage and Greens

3/4 pound Swiss chard
1/2 pound Andouille sausage, quartered lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick pieces
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1/2 cup water


Cut out center ribs and stems from chard, then thoroughly wash, along with leaves, in several changes of cold water. Cut ribs and stems crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick pieces and coarsely chop leaves. Remove chard stems and midrib from leaf. Chop chard into 1/4 inch strips and coarsely chop remaining leaves. Cook sausage and chard stems and mid-ribs over moderate heat, stirring occasionally for 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add chard leaves, water, and red-pepper flakes and simmer, partially covered, until chard stems are tender, about 5 minutes. Remove lid and stir in sausage. Add potatoes, pasta or rice if desired.

Italian Cauliflower
Here's Heather's favorite quick Italian cauliflower dish. This is best when the cauliflower is just tender, not mushy. Put a couple of sausages on the grill and toss a salad. There's dinner. Serves 4.

1 cauliflower, cut into florets
3 TB oil
1 medium onion, diced
3 TB vinegar
1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes
salt & pepper
red pepper flakes
minced Italian flat parsley

Heat oil in a wide deep skillet and saute onion until translucent. Add cauliflower and a couple tablespoons of water. Continue cooking and stirring often. When cauliflower and onion begin to brown a bit, add the vinegar. Cover and cook until vinegar cooks off. Stir in tomatoes, season with salt and pepper, pepper flakes, and parsley. Simmer covered until cauliflower is tender, about 5 to 10 minutes

Dilled Potatoes Vinaigrette
Adapted from a recipe found at epicurious.com. Serves 4.

1 pound russet potatoes, peeled
1/2 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider or white-wine vinegar
2 1/2 teaspoons dry vermouth or dry white wine
3 tablespoons sunflower or olive oil
1/4 cup minced fresh dill
2 scallions, chopped
lettuce for serving

Place whole potatoes in a steamer set over boiling water. Steam them, covered, for 15-20 minutes, or until they are just tender. When cool enough to handle, slice crosswise into 1/3 thick rounds. In a bowl whisk together the mustard, the vinegar, the vermouth, and salt to taste, add the oil in a stream, whisking, and whisk the dressing until it is emulsified. Add the potatoes while they are still warm to the dressing and toss them gently with the dressing, dill, scallions and pepper to taste until they are coated well.

Let the potato mixture stand, tossing it occasionally, for 30 minutes and serve it at room temperature a top mesclun or lettuce leaves torn into pieces. The potato mixture may be made 1 day in advance and kept covered and chilled. Let the potato mixture return to room temperature before serving.


Strip Steak and Blue Cheese Butter
A steak this beautiful did not need anything to make it better, but the blue cheese butter added a tang that complemented the beef without overpowering it, creating a pleasing layer of depth to the meal. Taken from Saveur.com.

2 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
2 tablespoons blue cheese
1 small shallot, minced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
1 small garlic glove, minced
Strip steak
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Season the steaks liberally with salt and pepper and allow it to come to room temperature while preparing the grill. Light a chimney 3/4 full of charcoal. While the charcoal is lighting, mix the butter, blue cheese, shallot, parsley, and garlic together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. When charcoal is fully lit and covered in gray ash, pour coals out and arrange them on one side of the charcoal grate, keeping the other side empty. Scrub and oil the grill grate. Grill the steaks directly over the coals for 6 minutes on each side, with the tenderloin portion of the steaks always facing the cooler side of the grill. Move the steaks to the cool side of the grill with the bone side facing the fire. Cover and continue to cook until desired doneness (about 6 additional minutes for medium-rare), flipping halfway through cooking. Remove steaks from the grill and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Top each steak with the blue cheese butter mixture and serve.