Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - February 24, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
2 lbs Carrots; 1 lb Daikon Radish; 2 lbs Rutabagas; 2 lbs Yellow Storage Onions; 2-3 lbsRed Cabbage; plus...

Frozen Winter Squash Puree
Bag of Shoots/Claytonia Mix


Localvore Offerings Include:

Elmore Mountain Pain Au Levain with Sifted Whole Wheat Flour
Champlain Orchards Cranberry Apple Cider
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs
Sour Pickles



NOTE: We are short eggs! National Life, Red Hen, On the Rise and Sweet Clover will not receive eggs this week. These sites will receive eggs next week.


Meg's Musings
Things are clicking along nicely at the farm. We are preparing our hardening off greenhouse for our first batch of onions and shallots that were seeded two weeks ago and will be transplanted outdoors in late April. Our heated greenhouse is seeded with quick growing brassicas that will be ready to harvest in a couple of weeks and will appear in your shoots/mesclun bags. We continue to plant tomatoes in succession and have starting grafting the first batch today. Our hothouse cucumbers and peppers are growing nicely alongside eggplant and basil, all on our heated slab and enclosed in a mini greenhouse. The rest of the slab is covered with quick growing bunching veggies that we will be transplanting into our large greenhouse.

Construction on the equipment shed will start back up in a week. In other construction news, we will be installing heaters into our movable greenhouses and laying pipe in the soil in one of them. The pipes will heat the soil and allow us to grow greens faster and also to grow varieties that are more sensitive to moisture. The heaters in the greenhouses will only be used minimally and not through the winter. We are starting to map out our fields and where we will be planting this year. New equipment and materials are being purchased on a daily basis, as we attempt to get all systems running smoothly. Things are looking good as we move into a new season!~ Meg


















Spring Meat Share - First delivery is next week March 3rd
We are continuing to accept members for the meat share. Once a month, the meat share delivers a selection of sustainably farmed, grass fed meats from Pete's and from other nearby farms that we know and love. All animals grown for the share are grown without use of hormones or chemical dewormers etc. All are raised on pasture (except the trout!) and many raised organically. This is meat grown in a way that is actually good for our environment, providing the needed fertility to compliment other crops grown on these farms. Grass fed meats contain a much higher vitamin concentration and much lower fat content than other meats. These meats are good for body and soul.

Sign-up for the Spring Meat Share (4 Deliveries: Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, June 2)

Pete's Pastured Chicken
We continue to sell chickens to Good Eats members delivering orders to sites every week except meat delivery weeks.

Our chickens are raised on pasture. Lots of pasture. Even as chicks in the barn, our little birds get to feast on sprouts and baby greens left from each days vegetable processing. As soon as they are large enough our birds move out onto pasture with moveable shelters and there they remain for the rest of their days, moved regularly to new fields of green. They can't help but ingest loads of healthy, vitamin packed organic forage throughout their lives and this goodness is assimilated in their meat.

We have just changed our chicken order form slightly so that you can now choose different sized birds, from a 4.5 lb to a 7 pounder (we have some big birds out there in the freezer!). The large birds are nice because you can roast one up, have a great meal, save the best meat for sandwiches, and STILL have leftovers for a casserole or soup or stew. Minimum order is 3 birds and birds are priced at $3.75/lb.

Click here to visit our chicken page and download an order form.


Job Openings at Pete's Greens
We are accepting applications for the the positions of wash-house manager and kitchen manager at the farm. These are two key positions for us. Complete job descriptions for these positions may be found on our site on our job postings page.

Applecheek Farm Conservation Effort
The Vermont Land Trust and the Clark Family have now raised all but $12,000 (!) of the $310,000 needed to permanently conserve the 243 acre organic farm in Hyde Park. Only 6 days remain for the fundraising effort to meet its March 1st deadline. Conservation will protect this prime farmland from development and retain it as a community agricultural and educational resource. Tax-deductible gifts or pledges can be mailed by March 1, 2010 to:
Vermont Land Trust
8 Bailey Avenue
Montpelier, VT 05602


Please make checks payable to the Vermont Land Trust and write “Applecheek Farm” in the memo line. For more information, contact: Tracy Zschau, Vermont Land Trust (802) 748-6089; tracy@vlt.org

Storage and Use Tips
Winter Squash Puree - We put up bags and bags of winter squash and pumpkin puree last Fall. What you'll find in the coolers at your site this week may be a mix of both. The bags contain just about a quart of pureed winter squash (mostly a variety of small Butternut) or pumpkin. The puree makes soup making a breeze! Just add a few ingredients and heat and serve. Steve has been making a pasta sauce with his this week, a recipe suggestion is below.

Rutabaga - The rutabaga is believed to have originated as a cross between a turnip and a cabbage! Sweeter than a turnip, rutabagas are delicious boiled and mashed with butter (with or without potatoes). Rutabagas should be peeled before use. This year when we harvested the rutabagas some of them came out of the ground with superficial worm track markings. Don't be deterred if your rutabagas have these marks. Just peel or slice off the outer layer (which you need to do anyway) and the inside should be just fine. Keep them loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your fridge and they'll last for several weeks at least.

Daikon Radish - The long white vegetable in your bags is the daikon radish or Chinese radish. Raw daikon is great sliced thinly in soups and stir-fries, or grated in slaws and salads. These radishes will keep well wrapped loosely in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

Mixed Colorful Carrots - The mixed carrots are a mix of bolero (the orange ones), yellowstone, white satin, and deep purples.

Shoots/Salad Mix - The salad mix today contains sunflower shoots (the large shoots), pink and white radish shoots (the little shoots), Claytonia greens (the spade shaped mild green), pea shoots (the viney ones), and chickweed (the larger leaf in the bag).

Onions - PLEASE READ! - A percentage of our onions have a layer deep inside that is spoiled. This was caused by the excessively wet summer and the problem is that we usually cannot tell the bad ones from the outside. The rest of the onion is perfectly good. Just remove the spoiled scale and use the rest of the onion as you normally would. We are doing our absolute best to find the flawed ones and we are valuing the onions at half price. Though we hate to send out flawed onions, we also hate the thought of not sending any and wasting these. Thanks for your understanding-this is one of the challenges of farming in a variable climate.
Localvore Lore

Just in from Elmore Mountain Bakery:
Today we are making a Pain Au Levain with Sifted Whole Wheat Flour. This is an old world sourdough bread that is made with Quebec grown whole wheat flour with the coarse bran sifted out. This gives the bread much of the health benefits of the whole wheat, but with a much lighter texture and a delicate sourdough flavor. We were inspired to make this bread which is different from our Country French by a recent article in the excellent Vermont publication, The Art of Eating. It was an examination of several French bakeries who believe that the best bread is made from organic stone ground flour, sourdough, pure sea salt and baked in wood-fired ovens. We hope you enjoy. ~Blair

Champlain Orchards blends their own freshly pressed sweet apple cider with cranberry juice provided by the Vermont Cranberry Company from cranberries grown here in Vermont. This 100% Vermont juice is very nutritious and has a crisp, clean flavor. Enjoy!

Deb Rosewolf is one of our team on the farm. At Deb's home farm she keep the hens who provide most of the eggs for Good Eats. Deb's eggs are totally pampered. The hens go in and out of their heated hen house at will, and they feast on lots and lots of vegetables and goodies that Deb brings them from the farm. Sometimes when we don't have quite the number of eggs we need we supplement with eggs from Gopher Broke Farm. George and Jane Nash have a small flock of about 100 free range happy hens on their farm in Wolcott, VT.

The sour pickles in the share today were made with certified organic cucumbers, cider vinegar, honey, mustard seed, ground mustard, and salt. They are barrel fermented in this brine. These pickles are very sour but we quite like them.

Recipes

Red Cabbage, Carrot, Daikon, Shoots Salad w/ Miso dressing
I can't seem to get enough of this salad lately and this share is perfect for it. I especially love it because I grate the vegetables in volume, and leave them in containers in the fridge. Then just before dinner I throw a handful of shoots in the bowl with handfuls of grated carrot, cabbage and some daikon, dress the salad and I am done. So easy.

Shoots Mix
Grated Carrots
Grated Red Cabbage
Grated Daikon Radish

Honey Miso Dressing
Honestly, if you have the ingredients on hand, you might as well make a double or triple batch. It's really yummy.

2.5 TB miso
w TB honey
2 tsp dijon
3 TB water
1 TB tamari
1 TB cider vinegar
1 tsp fresh ginger, grated or minced fine
1/2 tsp sunflower or sesame oil
1 clove garlic minced

Mix all ingredients together. Best to let sit 15 minutes to let flavors meld.

Carrot and Daikon Salad
In this recipe from Shizuo’s Tsuji’s Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, carrot and daikon are paired in a light, refreshing dish with a sweet and sour dressing called amazu. Salting and kneading the vegetables causes them to release their liquid. The dressing is then combined with the vegetables and the dish is refrigerated for at least 30 minutes (it’s even more flavorful if left overnight). Traditionally, the salad is served in small plates.

1 large carrot, cut into 2 inch x ½ inch matshsticks
1 lb daikon radish, cut into 1 inch x ½ inch matchsticks
1 tsp salt
¼ c. unseasoned rice vinegar
1.5 TB sugar
½ cup water

In a large bowl combine the carrot and daikon radish matchsticks. Add the salt and toss lightly. After several minutes, mix and lightly knead the vegetables with your hands. Working over a colander set in a bowl, gather up the vegetables in your hands and squeeze out the liquid. Rinse and dry the bowl. Place the vegetables in it.

In a glass bowl, mix the vinegar, sugar, and water. Heat in a microwave for 1 minute or until the sugar dissolves. Alternatively, heat the mixture in a small saucepan. Cool to room temperature.

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the vinegar mixture onto the vegetables. Mix with your hand and then squeeze the liquid from the vegetables. Discard the liquid.

Add the remaining dressing to the vegetables. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or for up to two days.

Baked Honeyed Rutabaga Discs
Martine Fiske, one of your fellow shareholders, contributed this recipe as a family favorite last year and we put it in the newsletter then. I thought we should bring it to light again. It's adapted from “The Victory Garden Cookbook” by Marian Morash. Excellent for turnips too..

2 medium rutabagas or large turnips (2 lbs total)
4 TB butter
1/4 c honey

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Peel rutabagas/turnips. Slice across width of vegetable to make ½ inch disks. Melt butter and brush onto baking sheet. Place disks on sheet and brush with butter. Bake for 15 minutes. Turn and coat with honey, bake another 15 minutes. Turn once more and coat with melted butter and honey. Bake another 15 minutes. You may have to adjust final time for size and thickness of the discs.

Winter Squash Sage Pasta Sauce
One of the farm team, Steve Schimoler, has been toying with this sauce for pasta using the winter squash puree. The amounts in the recipe below are a best guess sort of guideline. He's made this a few times and has not exactly been measuring. But when in doubt - taste!

1 Qt winter squash puree (thawed)
1 small onion, minced
1/4 - 1/2 stick butter
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage (or 1 tsp dried)
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 to 1 cup Cream, or Craime Fraiche
(and/or 2 oz finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (1 cup))

plus additional Parmigiano-Reggiano for serving

Bring a large pot of water to boil to cook your pasta in and cook your pasta according to directions.

Meanwhile, in a second large sauce pot over medium high heat melt the butter, and cook the onions and garlic until they are soft. Then add the sage and stir for about 15 seconds until fragrant. Then add squash, salt and pepper and heat through. Add cream or craime fraiche or the cheese at the very end. Mix the drained cooked pasta with the sauce, stirring gently to coat the pasta with the sauce. Serve topped with additional Parmigiano-Reggiano.

Winter Squash Soups
We have featured a couple recipes for Thai inspired Winter Squash soups that are so easy to make with this squash puree. They plus other recipes are available on Pete's blog. Take a look:

Good Eats Newsletter November 23

Good Eats Newsletter January 6th

Savory-Sweet Rutabaga Pudding
From the website www.angelicorganics.com: Somewhere between a fluffy ricotta dessert and mashed potatoes, this delectable rutabaga pudding has all the qualities needed to become a standard in your culinary repertoire. This dish will surprise you in many ways: in taste, in texture, in ease of preparing, and in the compliments it will bring to your table. It pairs exceptionally well with lamb. Friend of the Farm (adapted from Nika Hazelton’s Way with Vegetables). Serves 6 to 8.

1 large rutabaga (about 2 pounds), peeled, cut into 2-inch dice
1 1/2 teaspoons salt, divided
butter for greasing the baking dish
2 eggs plus 1 egg yolk, beaten
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup dried bread crumbs
1 tablespoon maple syrup
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
1/3 cup raisins, plumped in hot water for 15 minutes and drained (optional)
freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons butter

Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add the rutabaga and 1 teaspoon salt, partially cover, and cook until the rutabaga is very soft, 30 to 45 minutes. (You will need to reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking water.)

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Coat a 2-quart baking dish with butter.
Beat the eggs and egg yolk in a medium bowl. Stir in the cream, bread crumbs, maple syrup, and nutmeg.

Drain the rutabaga, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Mash the rutabaga thoroughly with a potato masher or run it through a food mill. If the mixture seems dry, add a little of the reserved rutabaga water as you mash. Add the egg mixture, raisins, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and a few grindings of pepper; stir to combine.

Transfer the rutabaga pudding to the prepared baking dish. Smooth the top and dot with butter. Bake until lightly golden on top, about 45 minutes. Serve hot.


Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - February 17, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:

2 lbs Nicola Potatoes; 2 lbs Celeriac; 2 lbs Parsnips; 2 lbs Red Onions; 1-2 Heads of Garlic; plus...

Frozen Sweet Mixed Peppers
Bag of Shoots/Claytonia Salad Mix


Localvore Offerings Include:
Red Hen Cyrus Pringle Bread
Champlain Orchards Empire Apples
Butterworks Whole Wheat Flour
Vt Butter and Cheese Creme Fraiche


Welcome to the Spring Share!
Your first pick-up is tomorrow (Wednesday).

Picking Up Your Share
If you are unsure of your pick-up times or site location, please visit our website's Pick-Up page. If you have any questions about your pick-up please email Amy Skelton. Though you may leave a message on voice mail at 802.586.2882 x2, email will get a quicker response.

When Picking Up Your Share Please:
Clipboard #1 - Check off your name on the pick-up list. The first clipboard contains a list of all share members at your site. Note that only one name is listed for each share. If you can't find your name on the list, look for your share partners name. Checking off your name lets us know who has picked up and is extremely helpful in solving any mysteries at the end of the day.

Check your share type on the list. Share types are Localvore, and Localvore Vegetarian. If you are listed incorrectly, let Amy know via email.

Clipboard #2 - Select your items following the Pick Up Instructions. These are posted on the second clipcoard. Follow the specific item list/instructions for the share you have selected to assemble your share. (Localvore Vegetarian or Localvore)
If you are sharing a share with someone - coordinate with your share-mate to make sure that you DON'T take double the amount of any items. All shares at the sites are whole shares.
Please note that the first Meat Share pick up is not this week, it is March 3rd.

What To Do If You Have a Problem at Pick Up

Though we do our best to make sure that every delivery and pick-up goes smoothly, there are the occasional shortages and disappointments. Should you arrive at your pick-up spot to find that one or more of your items are missing or that some of your produce is in unsatisfactory condition, please let us know right away! Our goal is 100% satisfaction. If you can call or email Amy as soon as you discover the problem, we may be able to resolve it the same day or the following day. If you would like to receive an item that you missed at pick-up, you must contact Amy by Thursday morning.

If we have not heard from anyone, by Thursday afternoon our site hosts are instructed to donate leftover food, assuring that they don't end up with bad food on their hands.

If we can't resolve your issue right away, contact Amy via email to arrange a replacement or substitution the following week.

Pete's Musings
Welcome to a new share period! The members who join for this period are the true die-hards, the hard core local eaters. Thanks for your commitment and I think that you'll find this share will be better than in the past. We have an earlier start on fresh greenhouse vegetables (pac choi, napa cabbage, chard and head lettuce and tomatoes are all an inch tall and growing fast), and lots of goodies remain in our walk in freezer. The farm is clicking along-hiring new crew members, putting the finishing touches on a new equipment shed, making orders to add minimal heat to a few more greenhouses, starting seeds almost daily, seeding greens in unheated greenhouses. We couldn't ask for nicer winter weather with perfect snow for afternoon skiing but not enough snow or cold to be a real hassle.

Hope some of you attended the NOFA conference last weekend at UVM. It was great. Excellent energy and great to have our whole congressional delegation and the U.S. Secretary of Ag. Tom Vilsack speak to a packed house in Ira Allen chapel. Vilsack mentioned Pete's Greens in his speech which was exciting. While most of our national ag policy still favors mega farms and non local production it is clear that Vilsack and the Obama administration are interested in fostering and supporting small local producers in unprecedented ways. It feels really good that small and local is moving beyond a fringe element and becoming a political force. ~ Pete


Newsletter Intro


My name is Amy Skelton and I write the Good Eats newsletter each week. It goes out every Tuesday evening with helpful information, farm updates, the week's share contents, storage and use tips, localvore information and recipes. Pete or Meg will often chime in with farm updates, thoughts and pleas for feedback. The picking for the weekly share begins on Monday and the packing of shares is finished late Tuesday afternoon. Though we try to get the newsletter out just as early as we can, we do like to wait until the share is finalized. Sometimes there are last minute changes to the contents and we want to make sure that you've got the right information to go with your pick-up. 
If, as happens occasionally, there are changes to the share that occur after the newsletter has been sent, you may receive a follow-up email Tuesday night or Wednesday.

If you have any feedback on the newsletter, recipe contributions or just general questions about the CSA, feel free to email me. 
We also post each newsletter on our blog. It generally gets posted sometime on Wednesday. There's a good history there for recipes, farm stories and share contents. 


Add amy@petesgreens.com to your address book to limit the possibility of having newsletters filtered as spam.



Spring Meat Share Still Open
The Spring Localvore share is full, but we are continuing to accept members for the meat share. Once a month, the meat share delivers a selection of sustainably farmed, grass fed meats from Pete's and from other nearby farms that we know and love. All animals grown for the share are grown without use of hormones or chemical dewormers etc. All are raised on pasture (except the trout!) and many raised organically. This is meat grown in a way that is actually good for our environment, providing the needed fertility to compliment other crops grown on these farms. Grass fed meats contain a much higher vitamin concentration and much lower fat content than other meats. These meats are good for body and soul.

Sign-up for the Spring Meat Share (4 Deliveries: Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, June 2)


Job Openings at Pete's Greens

We are accepting applications for the the positions of wash-house manager and kitchen manager at the farm. These are two key positions for us. Complete job descriptions for these positions may be found on our site on our job postings page.

Wash-house Manager
The wash house manager is involved in the harvest of vegetables from the fields, and oversees the cleaning, grading and packing of our produce. The wash house manager oversees 2-6 people working at different stations ensuring that a high level of quality control is maintained by all and processing is handled in an efficient manner. This is a physically and mentally demanding job requiring great organizational skills, ample energy, attention to detail, ability to manage and motivate people, clear written and verbal communication skills, and a positive attitude. This is a year round position with a 4 day work week.
Kitchen Manager
The kitchen manager is responsible for preserving a portion of the farm's harvest by means of freezing, canning, or incorporation into lacto-fermented products. The kitchen manager will help bring value added products to our CSA, a year round farmers' market in Montpelier and our farmstand in Craftsbury Village. The position requires an individual who is creative, focused and organized; is able to work independently and efficiently; can work well in a team environment; and can train and supervise kitchen staff. Knowledge of food, food preservation techniques, food safety is critical with proven ability to create and standardize large volume recipes a plus.


Help Protect Our Community’s Farmland!


Applecheek Farm:
A Community Asset
For over 40 years, the Clark family has owned Applecheek Farm producing organic milk and pasture-raised meat. They sell their meats at the Stowe and Montpelier farmers’ markets, and to area restaurants and stores. A year-round localvore store was recently opened on the farm.





In addition to providing local food, the farm serves as a valuable educational and recreational resource for the region and its visitors. The Clark family offers the community horse-drawn hay and sleigh rides, walks on their farm trails, picnics, and fabulous food prepared by Chef Jason Clark in their community hall. The Clarks also host field trips for area students. The farm has 125 acres of hay meadows and rotational pasture, all containing high-quality agricultural soil. Managed forestland covers the remaining 118 acres, which have a network of trails used in the farm’s popular sleigh rides and llama treks. Applecheek Farm offers majestic views of Elmore Mountain, the Worcester Range, and Mt. Mansfield. It is also on the road that leads to Green River Reservoir.
The Vermont Land Trust, together with the Clark Family are working to permanently protect Applecheek Farm. The Clark family would like to conserve their land to help transition the farm to the next generation and to offset the costs of diversifying the farm’s products. Nearly 90 percent of the money needed has been raised—there is just $33,000 to raise before the March 1 deadline. Your contribution will help secure this local food and educational resource for the community.

Tax-deductible gifts or pledges can be mailed by March 1, 2010 to:
Vermont Land Trust 8 Bailey Avenue Montpelier, VT 05602

Please make checks payable to the Vermont Land Trust and write “Applecheek Farm” in the memo line. For more information, contact: Tracy Zschau, Vermont Land Trust (802) 748-6089; tracy@vlt.org

Storage and Use Tips

Nicola Potatoes - These slightly waxy potatoes have a smooth yellow exterior and white and are creamy within. Nicolas are excellent for boiling, roasting and using in salads. Store in a cool dry place away from onions.

Celeriac - The gnarly looking thing in your bag is celeriac aka celery root. Celeriac is in the celery family but is grown for it's root instead of its stalk. It has a hint of celery taste and smell. Do your best to peel the exterior of the celery root (or cut off with a knife) without loosing too much of its cream colored flesh. Celeriac makes a tasty raw salad, though it should be mixed in with a bit of acid like vinegar or lemon juice to keep it from turning brown. It is also delicious in soups, casseroles, gratins, or boiled and mashed with potatoes. Celeriac should be stored unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.

Parsnips - Parsnips are usually eaten cooked, they can also be eaten raw like their relatives, the carrots. They have a sweet nutty flavor and lend themselves well to cooking with honey or maple syrup and butter and nutmeg, curries with ginger and garlic, and stews with sage and thyme. They are also quite aromatic. They are a very flexible starch. Try them sauteed, baked, roasted and mashed, as well as in soups and stews. Store parsnips as you would carrots, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.


Frozen Sweet Mixed Peppers - At the height of the season this summer, we stowed away lots of fresh peppers for Good Eats. In most bags, you will receive a mix of pepper varieties, some sweet green peppers, some sweet red peppers and there may very well be some mildly spicy peppers as well (If you are concerned with that, taking the seeds out of your peppers will go a long way toward minimizing the spiciness in your dish.) Leave peppers in the freezer til you are ready to use them. Then take out the peppers you will use for the dish you are making, and cut them as required for your recipe while they are still frozen. As they thaw they will soften and become harder to chop. These peppers can be used in any recipe that calls for cooking peppers. Chop them and toss them onto a pizza, or into a pasta dish, in a casserole, or alongside onions when grilling your meats.

Shoots/Salad Mix - The salad mix today contains sunflower shoots, Claytonia greens (the spade shaped mild green), and chickweed (the larger leaf in the bag). There may be an occasional sunflower hull in your bags. Though we try to get each one, invariably we miss a few here and there!

Onions - PLEASE READ! - We are doing our absolute best to find the flawed ones but a percentage of our onions have a layer deep inside that is spoiled. This was caused by the excessively wet summer and the problem is that we usually cannot tell the bad ones from the outside. We are valuing the onions at half price and the rest of the onion is perfectly good. Just remove the spoiled scale and use the rest of the onion as you normally would. Thanks for your understanding-this is one of the challenges of farming in a variable climate.

Localvore Lore
At Red Hen Baking Co today, Randy is preparing to bake his Cyrus Pringle loaves for Good Eats. This bread is made with all Vermont-grown wheat - 15% is Ben Gleason’s whole wheat and 85% is roller-milled white flour grown on Aurora Farms in Charlotte. Cyrus Pringle is a mild, versatile bread with a thin, crisp crust. It’s plenty chewy, so it stands up well to spreading things like butter or cream cheese or dipping in soups.

From Champlain Orchards we have Empire Apples. We had this apple variety somewhat recently in the share but they remain so crisp & juicy, and we had such good feedback on them that I decided to put them in again this week.

From Butterworks Farm, Jack Lazor brought us some of his bread flour. This is certified organic, whole wheat bread flour. The flour was ground fresh last week at the farm for the share this week. This flour is made from the whole grain and should be stored in a cool, dry place. If you think you will use it slowly, the fridge or the freezer is really the best place to keep it.

The Crème Fraîche from Vermont Butter and Cheese Co is wonderful. Crème Fraîche is a thickened cultured cream with a slightly tangy, nutty flavor and velvety, rich texture most similar to sour cream. It is perfect for thickening sauces and soups because it can be boiled without curdling. It is also delicious spooned over fresh fruit desserts. A dairy buyer is quoted as saying "It's one of the most extraordinary substances in the world of dairy, of gastronomy. To compare it to American sour cream is to compare spam to foie gras". Vermont Crème Fraîche is exquisitely rich, with a cultured, nutty flavor and creamy texture It was awarded 2nd Place in the American Cheese Society 2007 Awards in the Cow's Milk Creme Fraiche category.

Recipes

Cream of Parsnip Soup
This recipe came to me by way of long time member Margi Swett who said it was wonderful. This one has been modified from a Canyon Ranch recipe created for Epicurious. Serves 8.

2 teaspoons unsalted butter

3/4 cup minced onion, plus 1-2 cloves garlic

3/4 cup white wine

3 1/2 cups peeled, chopped parsnips (about 9 small)

5 cups chicken stock
3/4 teaspoon white balsamic vinegar

3/4 teaspoon salt

Pinch pepper

3/4 cup half-and-half (or half milk, half Creme Fraiche)

In wide saucepan over medium-low heat, melt butter. Add onion and garlic and sauté, stirring, until translucent, about 4 minutes. Add wine, stir well, and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until wine is reduced by half, about 10 minutes.
Add parsnips, chicken stock, vinegar, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer gently, uncovered, until parsnips are completely tender, about 45 minutes. Remove pan from heat and use immersion blender to purée the soup (or cool slightly and purée in batches in standing blender, transferring purée to clean saucepan). Whisk in half-and-half (or milk/creme fraiche). Set over low heat and rewarm until steaming. Serve 3/4 cup portions in soup bowls.

Apple, Parsnip and Potato Puree
A perfect recipe for this share, this one is from EatingWell September/October 1996. Sweet apples and earthy parsnips add depth to potato puree. Serves 4.

2 sweet fragrant apples, peeled, cored and sliced
2 parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced
1 1/2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks (about 4 potatoes)
2 large cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
Freshly ground white pepper, to taste

Combine apples, parsnips, potatoes and garlic in a large saucepan. Pour in cold water to cover, add salt and bring to a boil. Partially cover the pan and simmer over medium-low heat until the vegetables are very tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Drain the potatoes and mash with a potato masher until smooth. Stir in sour cream. Season with salt and pepper.
Winter Creme Fraiche Baked Potato Soup
The recipe was supplied by Vt Butter and Cheese. Serves 8.

5 baked potatoes
4 slices of bacon, chopped
1 small onion, diced
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
6 cups 1% milk
1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, grated
8 oz creme fraiche
1 tsp black pepper
3/4 cup scallions

In the oven, bake the potatoes at 400°F for one hour, then peel and mash coarsely. In a large casserole, cook the bacon and onions over medium heat until onions are translucent. Sprinkle flour over bacon and onions and stir until the mixture. Lower the heat and gradually whisk in the milk til blended. Turn heat back to medium and allow the milk mixture to thicken and come to a slow boil while stirring. Add mashed potatoes and cheese stirring until the cheese is melted. Lower the heat and add the creme fraiche, black pepper, and half the scallions. Cover and lower the heat for about 10 minutes, until hot (do not boil). Place soup in bowls and garnish with remaining scallions (and more grated cheese if you would like).
Whole Wheat Apple Muffins

These dark, moist muffins will keep well for several days, and the brown sugar on top, should you not skimp on it, adds a crunchy touch. Adapted from King Arthur Flour. Yield: 12-18 muffins

1 cup (4 ounces) whole wheat flour

1 cup (4 1/4 ounces) all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon cinnamon

1/2 cup (1 stick, 4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar

1/2 cup dark brown sugar, packed

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 cup (8 ounces) buttermilk or yogurt

2 large apples, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Grease and flour 18 muffin cups and set aside.

Mix together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon, and set aside. In a separate bowl, cream the butter and add the granulated sugar and 1/4 cup of the brown sugar. Beat until fluffy. Add the egg and mix well; stop once to scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl.Mix in the buttermilk gently. (If you over-mix, the buttermilk will cause the mixture to curdle.) Stir in the dry ingredients and fold in the apple chunks.
Divide the batter evenly among the prepared muffin cups, sprinkling the remaining 1/4 cup brown sugar on top.

Bake for 10 minutes, turn the heat down to 400°F, and bake for an additional 5 to 10 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Cool the muffins for 5 minutes in the tin, then turn them out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

Good Eats Newsletter - February 10, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
Green Cabbage; 2 lbs Purple Top Turnips; 2 lbs Orange Carrots; 1 lb Valentine Radishes, plus.....


Shoot/Claytonia Mix
Pesto
3 lbs Frozen Tomatoes

Localvore Offerings Include:
Elmore Mountain Bakery Flax Bread
Pa Pa Doodles Farm or Gopher Broke Farm Eggs
Dreuxmanna Crackers
Lazy Lady Oh My Heart Cheese

***This is the Last Delivery of the Fall/Winter Share***


Pete's Musings

Thanks for joining us for this share period. I really appreciate your support, encouragement, and suggestions. Our farm continues to progress and change and we are attempting to continually improve in our goal to offer the greatest diversity of local food possible, year-round. Thanks for filling out the share survey and grading us on the job we have done, and I hope you will consider joining us for a share in the future. Best ~ Pete


Spring Share Survey

Tomorrow you will receive an email with our Fall/Winter Share Survey. We would be very grateful if you could all take a few minutes to rate our veggie and localvore item selection and quality, and share with us any comments you might have about being part of Good Eats. These surveys are invaluable to us as we move forward planning future shares, plantings, and purchases of localvore products. The survey doesn't take long. Most questions only require ranking on a scale of 1 to 5. But there is space for you to share your own personal feedback as well, and we would love to hear it. The survey is anonymous of course. Please share with us your thoughts and help us improve!


Spring Share Nearly Full
Meg has been evaluating vegetable stores and Spring plantings in order to finalize the number of Spring Shares the farm will offer. I think it is safe to say that we are nearing the limit. If you have not yet sent in your spring share sign up, you might want to do that right away. I anticipate being full in the next few days. Feel free to check in with me before you mail. We have maybe 25 shares left.

Sign-up for the Spring Localvore Share
(Feb 17th - Jun 9th)


Spring Meat Share Still Open
We will continue accepting members for the meat share. Once a month, the meat share delivers a selection of sustainably farmed, grass fed meats from Pete's and from other nearby farms that we know and love. All animals grown for the share are grown without use of hormones or chemical dewormers etc. All are raised on pasture (except the trout!) and many raised organically. This is meat grown in a way that is actually good for our environment, providing the needed fertility to compliment other crops grown on these farms. Grass fed meats contain a much higher vitamin concentration and much lower fat content than other meats. These meats are good for body and soul.

Sign-up for the Spring Meat Share (4 Deliveries: Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, June 2)


Job Openings at Pete's Greens

We are still accepting applications for the the positions of wash-house manager and kitchen manager. We will begin the interview process later this week. Complete job descriptions for these positions may be found on our site on our job postings page.

Interested applicants should email cover letter and resume to me:
amy@petesgreens.com
Please put the job title in the subject line of the email.

Or send cover letter and resume by mail to:
Job Openings
Pete's Greens
266 S. Craftsbury Rd
Craftsbury, VT 05826


Wash-house Manager
The wash house manager is a key position at Pete's Greens as this person oversees all handling of produce on the farm and communicates with all other members of our team. The wash house manager is involved in the harvest of vegetables from the fields, and oversees the cleaning, grading and packing of our produce. The wash house manager oversees 2-6 people working at different stations ensuring that a high level of quality control is maintained by all and processing is handled in an efficient manner. This is a physically and mentally demanding job requiring great organizational skills, ample energy, attention to detail, ability to manage and motivate people, clear written and verbal communication skills, and a positive attitude. This is a year round position with a 4 day work week. Benefits include produce and partial health insurance. Pay is commensurate with abilities with potential for excellent pay.

Kitchen Manager
We are looking for an energetic and highly motivated individual to manage our commercial kitchen. The kitchen manager is responsible for preserving a portion of the farm's harvest by means of freezing, canning, or incorporation into lacto-fermented products. The kitchen manager will help bring value added products to our growing Good Eats CSA, a year round farmers' market in Montpelier and our popular farmstand in Craftsbury Village. The position requires an individual who is creative, focused and organized; is able to work independently and efficiently; can work well in a team environment; and can train and supervise kitchen staff. Knowledge of food, food preservation techniques, food safety is critical with proven ability to create and standardize large volume recipes a plus. Full time flexible hours. Longer hours may be required during the harvest months with fewer hours in the winter months. Pay is dependent on experience.


Localvore Lore
This week Elmore Mountain Bakery has baked their Quebec Flax Seed Bread, made with organic Milanaise Winter Wheat, Milanaise Whole Wheat, Milanaise Rye, Quebec Flax, Sea Salt and Sourdough. This bread is yummy, and will be great slathered with apple butter from last week's share.

Several months ago, Meg and Pete were at the Black Door in Montpelier and Meg was served some crackers while at the bar. The promo crackers were some of the best she had ever had and she told me all about them the following week. So Dreux, the maker of the crackers and I got in touch with one another and have been planning for this share since then. I agree with Meg, these are some of the best crackers I have had.
dreuxmanna is a love story...

In early 2008, my wife, El'Anya was sick and testing indicated that she was allergic to Wheat, Dairy, Soy and many other common foods and had to completely cut them out of her diet. After about 9 months with no bread, El'Anya asked me if I thought I could make her crackers. By this time we had discovered that she could tolerate Spelt; an ancient grain related to Wheat. I have been a chef for more than 30 years and began to experiment with recipes. I made her some saltines from the Spelt and she LOVED them! We began sharing them with family and friends and the idea for dreuxmanna* was born!

Using local, organic, sustainable ingredients and biodegradable packaging is very important to us and we soon discovered that LACE (Local Agricultural Community Exchange) and Community Action in Barre, VT have collaborated to create a Community Kitchen and development services for Micro Businesses and we began working with them in early 2009 to develop our idea. We are currently offering the Spelt Berry Cracker, Water Cracker and Maple Multi-Grain. We will soon be offering other cracker flavors including; Butter, Garlic and Herb and Spicy Cheddar, as well as a cookie line. Look for other Spelt goodies to be included in our line-up in the future! We hope you enjoy this bag of dreuxmanna Crackers and we would love to hear from you! Please email us your feedback. Brightest Blessings from the folks at dreuxmanna!! Chef Dreux Nightingale, Proprietor 802-461-4406 info@dreuxmanna.com

Dreux made up special mixed bags of crackers for the share so that each of you can sample the various flavors. All the crackers contain only organic grains and/or organic spelt flour and NO conventional wheat flour.

The decriptions below should help identify the 3 types of crackers included in the bags.
Water - The water crackers are the plain white flour crackers, light in color and containing no seeds.
Spelt Berry - The spelt berry crackers are a whole grain spelt cracker containing crushed spelt berries, (whole spelt grains) they have a “whole wheat” appearance
Maple Multi Grain - These are easy to identify, they are the darkest in color and have a distinct maple aroma. You can see that they contain corn meal and flax seeds.

To go along with the crackers, and in honor of Valentines Day, we have Lazy Lady's Oh My Heart cheese. In Westfield, VT Laini Fondillar makes small batches of some pretty fantastic cheese. The farm is named after her pampered herd of milking goats, not Laini. Laini herself is a force to be reckoned with as she works her off-the-grid farm and cares for the goats and other animals, and makes all sorts of cheeses. This time of year the goats are really lazy and are just hanging out waiting to kid, so Laini stays busy making cheese with milk from 2 neighboring organic cow dairies. Oh My Heart is a double cream bloomy rind semi ripened cheese made from Jersey milk and cream from Butterworks Farm.

And last, we have eggs from Pa Pa Doodles and Gopher Broke Farm. Enjoy!

Recipes

Pesto - In the share today is pesto made simply with basil and sunflower oil. We chose not to add other ingredients so that people could make the pesto that suits their personal taste best. We did try a bunch of different recipes though and had fun doing it. You could use some local aged cheese (try some old blue for a zesty pesto!) or go with something more classic. You could skip cheese altogether and try some nuts and lots of garlic.

To make a fairly simple pesto add the following to your 1/2 pint
1 clove minced or crushed garlic(or 2-3 depending on taste)
3 TB grated parmesan
2-3 TB pine nuts, lightly toasted
1/8 - 1/4 tsp salt

Shoot Salad with Honey Miso Dressing
I just had a delicious salad for lunch...

several large handfuls of shoots mix
2 valentine radishes sliced thin
about 1/4 green cabbage, sliced in thin ribbons in food processor
2 carrots grated in food processor

Honey Miso Dressing
2 1/2 tablespoons red miso
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons dijon mustard
3 tablespoons water or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon tamari
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, minced

Mix the miso, honey, and mustard together. Add the remaining ingredients, mix until smooth. Let sit 15 minutes before using.

Tomato Soup
To go along with my salad, I also made a simple tomato soup. It's very basic, and could be made richer with the addition of some milk or cream, some grated cheese (cheddar or a parm would be great). Serve with some nice fresh flax bread for a good quick meal.

4 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
1/2 onion sliced thin
3 whole cloves
2 cups chicken broth

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt (more or less depending on the stock and your taste)
2 teaspoons honey

In a stockpot, over medium heat, combine the tomatoes, onion, cloves and chicken broth. Bring to a boil, and gently boil for about 20 minutes to blend all of the flavors. Remove from heat. Remove cloves. Run the mixture through a food mill into a large bowl, or pan. Or puree in blender or food processor (Carefully! Hot liquid!).

In the now empty stockpot, melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in the flour to make a roux, cooking until the roux is a medium brown. Gradually whisk in a bit of the tomato mixture, so that no lumps form, then stir in the rest. Season with honey and salt, and adjust to taste.

Optional - After adjusting seasonings, you could add a touch of cream, or some grated cheese if desired.

Moroccan Style Chicken and Root Vegetable Stew
This recipe from epicurious comes with many solid reviews. I offer it here as a theme, and there is lots of room for improvisation. If you are vegetarian, you can substitute chick peas for the chicken and veggie broth for the chicken broth. You can dig through your fridge and use different root vegetables. Potatoes, winter squash, carrots, parsnips, turnips, celeriac, even some cabbage, all would work great in this stew. Serve it up with couscous and some salad for a fine meal. Adapted from Bon Appétit January 1998, the recipe serves 6.

1 tablespoon olive oil
12 ounces boneless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces (or chicken thighs or some leftover cooked chicken would work great!)

1 1/2 cups chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 cinnamon stick (or 1/2 tsp cinnamon)
2 cups 1/2-inch pieces peeled carrots
2 cups 1/2-inch pieces peeled parsnips (or more turnips, carrots, potatoes)
2 cups 1/2-inch pieces peeled turnips
1 cup 1/2-inch pieces peeled rutabaga (or potatoes)
2 cups canned chicken (or veggie) broth
1/4 cup dried currants or raisins
1 cup drained diced tomatoes
Chopped fresh cilantro (or dried or frozen)

Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Add chicken to pot and sauté until light golden but not cooked through, about 1 minute. Transfer chicken to bowl. (Skip this step if you are using leftover roast chicken from a previous meal.)

Add onion to pot and sauté until golden, about 4 minutes. Add garlic and stir 1 minute. Add curry powder, cumin and cinnamon stick and stir 30 seconds. Add sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, broth and currants. Cover and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes. Add tomatoes and chicken with any accumulated juices to pot. Simmer until chicken is cooked through and flavors blend, about 5 minutes longer. Sprinkle with cilantro and serve.

Tunisian Stew
This one has been adapted slightly from a recipe in Andrea Chessman's Serving Up the Harvest. This is a simple and tasty way to get to know this vegetable a bit better.

1 large onion, coarsely chopped
3 TB olive oil
1 lb turnips, peeled and grated
1 lb tomatoes, skinned and cut into pieces
Sea salt
Black pepper, coarsely ground
1½ tsp paprika
1 tsp coriander powder
Pinch of cayenne pepper
1 lb spinach
Large handful of parsley, finely chopped

Fry the onion in oil in a saucepan. When the onion is soft, add the turnips and tomatoes. Season with salt, organic black pepper and organic spices, half cover with water and simmer, uncovered until the turnips are cooked but still crisp. Turn the turnips over once so that they cook evenly. Wash spinach, cut off stems and cut leaves into ribbons. Put them into the saucepan and cook, stirring, until they crumble. Serve hot and garnished with parsley.

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - February 3, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
2 lbs Rose Gold or Red Norland Potatoes; 2 lbs Red Beets; 2 lbs Red Onions; 1 lb Sunchokes, 1 Bulb of Garlic plus.....


Shoot/Claytonia Mix
1 Bag Frozen Squash Puree
1 lb Bag Frozen Braising Greens


Localvore Offerings Include:
Red Hen Maize Bread
Vermont Pasta Linguine
Pete's Sauerkraut
Champlain Orchards Apple Butter

**THIS IS A MEAT SHARE WEEK**
Only Two Deliveries Left
This week, February 3rd and next week February 10th are the last 2 weeks of this share period. The Spring share begins on February 17th.


Spring Share Sign-up Forms due by February 10th
There's only one week left to get your sign up sheet in without interruption to your weekly deliveries. In order to ensure delivery on February 17th, your forms and payments need to be mailed to the farm by February 10th.

Don't miss out on your weekly deliveries of fresh, organic Vermont grown goodness! We are gearing up for spring now, planting seedlings and getting the greenhouses ready for new growth. It won't be long now before a new bounty springs forth. We will continue to grow shoots and sprouts and some winter salad greens through the early months of the share but by April you can expect a wide variety of fresh spring greens, from mesclun and baby spinach and arugula to pac choi, chard and a variety of Asian greens. We'll have new young roots and scallions and such by April as well and by May and June we'll be into head lettuces and cucumbers, radishes, baby fennel and more.

As always, we will continue to bring you a variety of localvore items. This share will bring eggs every other week, bread most weeks, regular appearances of local flours and grains, new cheeses, local sweeteners, locally grown mushrooms, tofu and soy products, apples and fruits, and new products as we discover them.

Sign-up for the Spring Localvore Share (Feb 17th - Jun 9th)

Sign-up for the Spring Meat Share (4 Deliveries: Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, June 2)














Spring Vegetables May 2009 and Salad Greens Jan 24, 2010


The Great Equipment Saga of 2010

As some of you have read, one of my obsessions is the acquiring of farm equipment. I'm not sure why I enjoy it so much as I'm not especially mechanical, but I do really appreciate the way a new piece of equipment can improve the farm. Time after time we've found that getting the proper piece of steel saved time, made life easier for those doing the physical work, and made the farm more financially secure. Those are all good reasons for loving farm equipment but I think the real reason I love it is the toy factor. This stuff is just like playing with Tonkas in the sand box.

I spend significant time each winter looking for equipment online. Often it is a special item, not so easy to find. Heading the list this winter is a root crop sizer and onion topper. I found a sizer at an equipment dealership in Ontario a couple months back and made a deal with the owner on the phone. One of the side effects of frequently upgrading equipment is that you start to accumulate things that are too small, too old, or for some other reason don't fit the operation. I agreed to trade him a greens washer and conveyor belt that we no longer use for the root sizer and some future credit.

Meg and I set off across New York pulling a 25 ft gooseneck trailer with our underpowered F 250. Top speed was 51 mph which made for a long trip to western Ontario. Along the way we stopped at a conference in Syracuse and spoke about winter greens production. Crossing into Canada was simple and we avoided the heavy taxes we'd been told we'd have to pay for importing farm equipment into Canada. During our final 5 hours of driving we bucked a 40 mile an hour headwind which dropped our speed to 45 mph and our mileage to less than 8 mpg. Upon arrival the equipment dealership accidently flipped our greens washer upside down while unloading it, smashing some critical parts. After spending a frozen afternoon on the Ontario tundra we loaded the root crop sizer and headed to Guelph for another conference.

We spoke at the Guelph conference and decided to get a jump on the trip home and headed to the border. We'd been assured by the dealership that they had done all the paperwork for the border crossing. The first time we tried to cross we were turned back as we did not have an ace manifest. Our second attempt was at a different crossing where we knew our manifest was residing in the Fed Ex broker office not 50 ft. from where we sat in our truck talking to the Customs agent. We were not allowed to walk the 50 ft. to get the Manifest as the rule is that you must have the Manifest before you get to the agent. Then we were subjected to a full vehicle x-ray, threatened with a $5000 fine for attempting to cross twice without proper paperwork, and sent back to Canada.

Finally after an overnight in Canada and some 1 a.m. phone calls with a different broker we got the proper paperwork faxed and were on the road in the morning. I'd like to say it was great to be back in the States but the general rudeness we received from border agents on the U.S. side contrasted with the general pleasantness of the Canadian agents and the real friendliness of everyone we met in Ontario. Maybe Pete's Greens will be moving north, eh? ~ Pete

Pete's Greens served up on FarmPlate

Kim Werner featured Pete's Greens for the FarmPlate blog last week. Click here to read the post. FarmPlate is a on line community for folks interested in eating locally and sustainably. There are lots of great posts here, some dedicated to farmers, some to producers, some to restaurants who are working hard to promote the localvore movement. There are recipes here too, as well as great short posts on subjects such as food labeling and sustainable seafood. Take a look around, there's lots of good information here.


Job Openings at Pete's Greens
As I mentioned last week, we are looking for two people with unique skills to fill important positions on the farm. We have received quite a few applications and will begin the review process later this week and begin scheduling interviews next week. Complete job descriptions for these positions may be found on on our site on our job postings page.

Interested applicants should email cover letter and resume to me:
amy@petesgreens.com
Please put the job title in the subject line of the email.

Or send cover letter and resume by mail to:
Job Openings
Pete's Greens
266 S. Craftsbury Rd
Craftsbury, VT 05826


Wash-house Manager
The wash house manager is a key position at Pete's Greens as this person oversees all handling of produce on the farm and communicates with all other members of our team. The wash house manager is involved in the harvest of vegetables from the fields, and oversees the cleaning, grading and packing of our produce. The wash house manager oversees 2-6 people working at different stations ensuring that a high level of quality control is maintained by all and processing is handled in an efficient manner. This is a physically and mentally demanding job requiring great organizational skills, ample energy, attention to detail, ability to manage and motivate people, clear written and verbal communication skills, and a positive attitude. This is a year round position with a 4 day work week. Benefits include produce and partial health insurance. Pay is commensurate with abilities with potential for excellent pay.

Kitchen Manager
We are looking for an energetic and highly motivated individual to manage our commercial kitchen. The kitchen manager is responsible for preserving a portion of the farm's harvest by means of freezing, canning, or incorporation into lacto-fermented products. The kitchen manager will help bring value added products to our growing Good Eats CSA, a year round farmers' market in Montpelier and our popular farmstand in Craftsbury Village. The position requires an individual who is creative, focused and organized; is able to work independently and efficiently; can work well in a team environment; and can train and supervise kitchen staff. Knowledge of food, food preservation techniques, food safety is critical with proven ability to create and standardize large volume recipes a plus. Full time flexible hours. Longer hours may be required during the harvest months with fewer hours in the winter months. Pay is dependent on experience.


Pete's Pastured Chicken

Our chickens live(d) a fabulous life roaming around the fields in the good company of their friends the pigs. From an early age they dined on our sprouts and shoots before they were able to move out onto organic pasture land. It is a documented fact that the meat of pastured poultry is packed with a higher vitamin content and is lower in fat than birds raised in the standard barn environment. Most free range birds aren't pastured and may never eat grass, they just have more room to roam in their barns and yards than factory birds. Pastured meats are the healthiest for you and for the environment.

Get your birds now! We deliver orders weekly to pick up sites. Click here to go directly to the chicken page where you can download an order form.


Localvore Lore
We have Red Hen Baking Co's Maize bread this week. Each time Randy makes the bread he changes the formula a bit as he fine tunes it. Randy uses a local corn variety called Wapsie Valley grown at Aurora Farms (and sold under the Nitty Gritty Grains label). The bread features around 25% cornmeal and then the balance is made up with flour. I believe in this week's loaves Randy is using the organic white flour grown at Aurora Farms. He uses two kinds of starter, both a yeasted starter and one made with his wild-yeasted levain. The bread is hearty with a crust that has a great corn flavor. This bread is a work in progress so please email your feedback!

For a long time I have wished for a truly local pasta, and finally there is one in our midst. Ted Fecteau recently started his VT Pasta company in Barre. Tim ran into Ted at the Capitol City Farmers Market and they got to talking... Since then, we have urged Ted to create some pasta for Good Eats. What you receive this week is the result of some experimentation and testing and we think the end product is fantastic. The linguine in the share is a 50/50 mix of Ben Gleason's whole wheat flour and Aurora Farm's white flour. The other ingredients in the pasta are water and local eggs. A bit of organic rice flour is used to dust the pasta to keep it from sticking but the amount is tiny. To cook this fresh pasta, Ted recommends the following. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the frozen or thawed pasta to the water and bring back to a boil over high heat for 1-2 minutes. Drain pasta with a colander and dress as desired. The container the pasta is packaged in what looks like plastic but in fact is made of corn and is completely compostable. We really look forward to your feedback on this one. If people like this pasta we are excited to be able to offer it on a fairly regular basis, a couple times during a share. Please email us and tell us what you think.

We have Champlain Orchards Organic Apple Butter made with Champlain Orchards organic apples, with added organic cinnamon, cloves and allspice. This is the unsweetened variety rather than the kind with added sugar. Apple butter is delicious spread on bread, toast, pancakes, waffles, on vanilla ice cream, etc. The apples are pureed and cooked down which makes it thick and concentrates the natural sugars in the apples.

We have a new batch of Pete's Sauerkraut this share, this time a simple classic sauerkraut made with just cabbage and salt. The lactobacilli responsible for turning the cabbage into sauerkraut brings numerous benefits beyond preserving the cabbage. The lactobacilli in fermented foods enhances the digestibility of the foods and increases vitamin levels. The lactobacilli produce numerous beneficial enzymes as well as antibiotic and anticarcinogenic substances and the lactic acid also promotes the growth of healthy flora throughout the intestine. This is an excellent food and it is highly recommended that we each eat a small amount of fermented vegetables each day.


Storage and Use Tips
Sunchokes - Sunchokes are the tuber of a perennial flower in the sunflower/aster family and are native to North America. There are competing theories as to how they came about their other name Jerusalem artichokes. In 1605, Samuel de Champlain first saw Native Americans harvesting these sweet crunchy tubers. The Native Americans called them sun roots, but Champlain thought they tasted like artichokes and called them artichauts de Canada. The plants were also clearly a member of the sunflower family and so were also called girasole (Italian for sunflower, meaning "turning to the sun"). It is thought that somehow these two names merged to become Jerusalem artichokes.

Sunchokes can be eaten raw or cooked in all the same ways that you can cook potatoes. Scrub the tubers thoroughly with a brush. Peeling can be difficult because of the knobbiness and is not necessary, the peels are edible. Like potatoes the flesh will darken with exposure to air so if serving them raw, dip in acidulated water. Because of high levels of iron, stored cooked sunchokes will also turn gray. This can be minimized by adding ¼ tsp cream of tartar or 1 TB vinegar or lemon juice to the cooking water. They cook quickly and will turn to mush so monitor carefully. Sunchokes should be stored in a cool, dry place or in the vegetable drawer wrapped in paper towels to absorb moisture and sealed in a plastic bag.

Shoot/Salad Mix - The shoot mix this week is a blend of sunflower shoots, radish sprouts, claytonia, and chickweed.

Meat Share

Applecheek Farm Veal Cutlets - John and Rocio Clark are very proud of how they run their farm and raise their animals. Their meat is all certified organic. Although not in the business of raising veal, male calves are part of the reality on their organic dairy. According to Rocio, "Our veal is raised the old fashioned way, with plenty of milk from their mothers. They nurse whenever they choose; with plenty of grass in our certified organic fields and with plenty of fresh air and sunshine. As a result, their meat is rosy pink with a robust flavor and great tenderness and is very high in nutrients. The calves are born in the spring and slaughter in the fall." Pounded thin, coated in breadcrumbs and fried in butter, these cutlets make awesome Wiener Schnitzel. Serve them with braised cabbage and German potato salad and you'll be in Alsatian heaven!

A recipe for Emeril Lagasse's Veal Parmesan can be found on the Sep 1, 2009 blog post.

Bonnieview Lamb Kabobs - The lamb in the share was grown for us by Neil and Kristin at Bonnieview Farm. These lambs are mostly male offspring of Neil's herd of dairy sheep. The kabobs are a shoulder cut and should be marinated to tenderize them. I have included an Indian kabob recipe below that should be delicious.

Mountain Foot Trout - We last had Curt Sjolander's trout in the share last August. It takes a long time for the trout to reach a marketable size, and that is why there is often a long time span between their appearance in the meat share. Curt raises these brown trout in ponds on his farm in Wheelock, VT. The fish are raised in very cold water (especially this time of year) and due to the cold water and low stocking density, Curt never needs antibiotics for his fish. This is fish farmed in a very sustainable way. The fish have been descaled and cleaned, but the skin and bones remain.

Pete's Chicken - We have selected some large chickens for you this week. You'll be able to roast or stew a large one and have plenty leftover for other meals!

Recipes

Butternut Squash-Parsnip Soup with Thyme
In case you still have parsnips in your veggie drawer leftover from last week (I know I didn't offer up a recipe last week).... This one is from Bon Appetit October 1997.

2 tablespoons butter
1 2-pound butternut squash, unpeeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, cut into 8 pieces
1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces, thick end pieces cut lengthwise in half
1/4 cup water
1 onion, halved, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme or 3/4 teaspoon dried
4 cups canned low-salt chicken broth
1 cup half and half

In a pot of boiling water, simmer parsnips til tender. Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large skillet over medium-low heat. Add onion and thyme; sauté until onion is tender and golden, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

Puree onion mixture and parsnips until smooth using a food processor or a potato masher if you don't mind some lumps in your soup. Mix in broth and squash puree.

Transfer mixture to heavy large saucepan. Whisk in half and half (you can substitute whole or even low fat milk here if you lke). Bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Rewarm before serving.)

VT Pasta Linguine Three Ways
Of course there are endless ways to dress up your VT Pasta linguine. The sauce will likely take you longer to make than the pasta itself, so with this lovely fresh pasta have everything else ready before dropping the pasta in the pot. To cook the pasta, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, then put in the thawed or frozen pasta. Bring the water back to a boil for 1-2 minutes. Then immediately drain the pasta, transfer back to the cooking pot, stir in your chosen additions, and serve.
1. Butter and Parmesan - For simplicity, to let the pasta flavor shine through, this is the way to go. After draining the pasta, simply transfer to a bowl and add a knob of butter and some shaved parmesan.

2. Sundried Tomato, Olive and Garlic
Put a TB or so of olive oil in a pan and add 10 -20 chopped kalamata olives, a few chopped sundried tomatoes and 2-3 cloves of minced garlic (and a sprinkling of crushed red pepper if you want some spice). Heat gently til fragrant. Remove from heat and add to pasta coating the pasta well (add a bit more olive oil if necessary). Finish off with some grated parmesan and serve.

3. Butternut Squash Sauce and Braising Greens over Linguine
1-2 TB butter or oil
half a small onion, sliced thin
pinch of sugar
1-2 cloves of garlic
a few leaves of sage
2 cups of squash puree
1/4 cup braising greens

For this one, saute a small onion in the pan in a TB or two of butter or olive oil with a pinch of sugar til very soft. Add in 3 cloves of minced garlic and a few leaves of sage if you have them in the last several minutes, and do not let the garlic brown. Add 2-3 cups of squash puree plus 1/4 bag of braising greens and heat through. Finally, add 1/2 cup of parmesan to the sauce. Taste to adjust seasonings and then combine with your pasta. Add more grated parm t finish the dish if you like.

Lemon and Herb Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes
This one has been adapted slightly from a recipe in Andrea Chessman's Serving Up the Harvest. This is a simple and tasty way to get to know this vegetable a bit better.

1 lb Sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichokes)
1.5 TB olive oil
1 garlic clove
a light sprinkling of dried basil
zest of a 1/4 lemon
coarse or kosher salt

Preheat the oven to 500F and lightly grease a shallow roasting pan with oil.

Scrub the sunchokes well or peel them. Cut off the irregular knobs to make reasonably regular shapes. Cut the sunchokes into 1-inch pieces. Combine sunchokes with the oil in a large bowl and toss to coat. Arrange in a single layer in the prepared pan.

Roast for about 15 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally for even cooking. While the sunchokes roast, combine the basil, garlic, and lemon zest in a mini food processor or on your cutting board and finely chop.

Sprinkle the lemon-herb mixture over the sunchokes and continue to roast for about 5 more minutes. The sunchokes should be well browned and tender, and the garlic should be fragrant but not burned.

Transfer the chokes to a serving bowl or platter. Sprinkle with salt and serve at once.

Grilled or Broiled Whole Trout with Herbs and Bacon
This is a great, tasty and simple way to cook your fish. If you don't have a handful of fresh herbs, you could also put some lemon slices in the fish.

2 whole trout
1/2 cup fresh herbs such as tarragon, thyme, marjoram, etc.
olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/4 pound bacon

Rinse fish and pat dry. Season with salt and pepper inside and out. Place fresh herbs inside cavity of fish. Lightly oil both sides of fish. Wrap seasoned, oiled fish with bacon mummy style, leaving head and tail exposed.

Place fish under the broiler (or on the grill, covered). Cook undisturbed for 3-4 minutes, taking care not to burn the bacon (move to a lower rack if necessary). Turn and continue to cok. Turn again if necessary. The fish is done when the bacon is crisp and there are no longer any traces of blood in the body cavity. No more than 12-15 minutes and could be a good bit less in a hot oven.

Place fish onto platter and serve immediately.
Lamb Kabobs
This recipe is from Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking, a cookbook I love and turn to often.

1 lb lamb cut into 3/4 inch cubes
8 TB plain natural yogurt
3 TB lemon juice
2 1-inch cubes of ginger, peeled and grated or minced fine
2 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1.5 tsp salt
3 TB vegetable oil

Put the meat into a stainless steel bowl. Combine the yogurt, lemon juice, ginger, garlic, cumin, coriander, cayenne and salt in a bowl and mix well with a fork. Hold a sieve over the meat and pour the yogurt mixture into it. Push the mixture through the sieve, extracting all the paste you can. Mix the meat and the marinade well. Cover and refrigerate for 6-24 hours.

Heat your broiler.

Thread the meat on to skewers. Balance the skewers on the rim of a baking dish so that all the meat juices drip into the dish. Brush the kebabs generously with oil and place the baking dish under the broiler. When one side of the meat gets lightly browned, turn the skewers to brown the opposite side, making sure to brush this side first with more oil. Brown second side.