Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Good Eats Newsletter - September 30, 2009

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains
1 lb Tomatoes; 1 medium head of Napa Cabbage; 1.5 lbs Sweet Red Peppers; 1 lb Pac Choi; 1 Bunch of Large Leeks; Mixed Green and Purple Kohlrabi; Brussel Sprouts; Broccoli; 1 Bunch of Celery and 1 Bunch of Dill.

Localvore Share Members Also Receive
Red Hen All Vermont Potato Bread
Consider Bardwell Farm Manchester Cheese
Honey Gardens Apiaries Blueberry Honey



New Sites for Fall!

It's been a long time coming but we are finally adding some new sites to the Wednesday delivery schedule. So far we have added Richmond and Shelburne, we have traded one site for another in Montpelier, and we are considering adding a THIRD site in Burlington. It's exciting to have the opportunity to bring food to new people. We are also discussing a Newport option, and have explored Johnson a bit as well.

Shelburne
- We have wanted to add a Shelburne location. Our new partner in Shelburne will be Shelburne Vineyard located at 6308 Shelburne Rd. Pick up times still TBD as we fine tune the new schedule but they are likely to be noon to 5:30pm.




Richmond
- On the Rise Bakery will be hosting the share and pick up times will be between 11 am and 6 pm.

Montpelier
- along with National Life, we will also be delivering to Montpelier Mud at 141 River St (just a short distance from current May Day Studio location). Pick up times
11am to 9pm.

Burlington
- We'd like to
add a third location on the Northwest side of Burlington and to that end are looking at a couple new site options. Stay tuned for more on this.

Newport
- At this time, we are still just exploring this, but we may develop a partnership with some willing members who would pick shares up at the farm and bring them back to Newport for members there. Again, stay tuned for developments.












Pete's Musings

Fall harvest is in full swing, or would be if it could dry out a little. Last Saturday we harvested an acre and a half of gorgeous potatoes. They are stacked on 28 pallets in the barn and tomorrow we'll send them over the brush washer to clean off dirt and cull out the bad ones. We used our new digger which was great but has the unfortunate effect of making the folks working on it motion sick. There is a fast moving chain carrying soil, potatoes, and weeds, and the crew mans the sides of the digger to remove the weeds. I drove the tractor pulling the thing most of the day and only climbed onto the harvester for the last 4 beds. It made me so motion sick I went in the house and slept for 3 hours. Fortunately the rest of the crew is hardier than I am and only experienced minor discomfort. We have 3 more acres of potatoes and I'm growing concerned about the wet days we have ahead but I'm sure it will work out. After that we'll move onto Valentine radishes, followed by beets, turnips, carrots and celeriac and cabbage. All the crops look great and are appreciating the recent moisture. Greenhouse greens are looking nice, we'll be moving the moveable houses in another 3 weeks. Tomorrow we'll plant our large greenhouse in mizuna, arugula and tatsoi and that will finish our planting for the season. We hope you can join us for the fall CSA period, it will be better than ever. ~Pete


Just Two Weeks left before the start of the Fall/Winter share!
It's hard to believe that Fall share starts in just two weeks but it surely does. Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download your sign up form.

Looking to split your share? If you are looking for someone to split a share with this Fall, take a peek on our Members Seeking page, where we post requests from people looking to split shares or share pick up duties etc. Already several members have found share partners for the Fall share. Please email me if you'd like to have a message posted there.

Pete's Pastured Chicken Order your chickens and fill your freezer. You can now order as few as 3 chickens and have them delivered to your Good Eats pick up site. Visit the Pastured Chicken page for order info including available delivery dates and to download an order form. These are great tasting chickens raised on an abundance of greens and grass throughout their lives. This is healthy, nutritious, vitamin packed meat that you can feel great about eating. Only $3.75/lb.

High Mowing Wins Lawsuit Against Genetically Altered Crops
The 9th Circuit Court in California ruled in favor of High Mowing Seeds, Center for Food Safety (CFS), Organic Seed Alliance and the Sierra Club in the lawsuit against the USDA regarding the premature deregulation of Monsanto's GMO sugar beets. This was an important victory and means that the USDA will likely require more thorough research and a full Environmental Impact Study prior to allowing more GE crops to be released. The lawsuit was brought by the groups in January 2008. They claimed that the agency failed to adequately assess the environmental, health, and associated economic impacts of allowing Roundup Ready sugar beets to be commercially grown without restriction. Sugar beet seeds are primarily grown in Oregon's Willamette Valley where seeds for other crops related to sugar beets, like organic swiss chard and table beets, are also grown. These crops would be at risk of contamination by wind pollination from the GM sugar beets. Some tidbits related to this story:

  • 1.1 million acres were planted in sugar beets in 2009
  • almost half of the sugar grown in the US comes from sugar beets
  • Roundup Ready crops allow farmers to spray their fields with Monsanto's Roundup herbicide without killing the crop. Constant application of Roundup has resulted in Roundup resistant weeds, and there are now millions of acres across the U.S. of such "superweeds", and farmers are using greater applications of Roundup or other, even more toxic chemicals
  • GM crops increased herbicide use in the U.S. by 122 million pounds – a 15-fold increase – between 1994, when GE herbicide-tolerant crops were introduced, and 2004
Support the Farm Share Program - Shop or Dine this Thursday
NOFA-VT's Share the Harvest Event
Each year for one day area restaurants that participate in Share the Harvest generously pledge 15% of their sales to support NOFA-VTs Farm Share Program. The Farm Share program enables limited income Vermonters to purchase a CSA share from a local participating farm by subsidizing up to 50% of the cost of the share. NOFA's annual Share the Harvest event is the sole fund raiser for the matching funds that NOFA contributes to the Farm Share program. Farm Share's ability to help people is dependent on the success of this event. So make your plans to dine out on October 1st. Or structure your week so that you can do your grocery shopping that day! A full 15% of what you spend that day will be donated to the program. The list of participating businesses can be found on the NOFA-VT website.


Localvore Lore This week's bread is an all Vermont Potato Bread from Red Hen Baking Co. Randy is baking this bread with a combination of potatoes from Foote Brook Farm and the fresh 2009 wheat flour from Aurora Farm in Charlotte. Randy is particularly interested to hear feedback on the breads made with this new wheat. Please share your comments by e-mail. I am really excited about the cheese in this share and really hope you like it as much as I do.

Consider Bardwell Farm is 300 acre goat dairy in West Pawlett, VT. The farm, originally founded by Consider Stebbins Bardwell was actually the site of the first cheese co-op established in VT in 1864. Now in the hands of four enterprising cheesemakers, the farm is once again gaining notoriety for the stable of award winning cheeses made there. Manchester is an aged raw goats milk cheese with an earthy, nutty flavor and bold bite. This cheese was an award winner at the American Cheese Society Awards in 2008, and was named one of the 100 World's Best Cheeses by Wine Spectator. Aged anywhere from four to seven months, Manchester is a robust and slightly spicy cheese. It’s texture and temperament make it perfectly suited to shave over salads, or as a table cheese. Please, please, please let this cheese warm to room temperature for full flavor!


We have a second serving of honey for you this week, this time Honey Gardens Apitherapy Honey is coming straight from the blueberry fields. Blueberries depend on honey bees for pollination for the setting of their fruit. When honeybees are brought to pollinate the blueberry flowers, the fruit crop is increased around 300% compared to relying on just the wild bees and other insects for pollination. Beekeepers bring their honey bees to the blueberry fields each season. Not only is pollination important to the berry farmer, but for the beekeepers the work comes at a time after a long winter where the income is gratefully received for all of the expenses of the honey season ahead. Todd Hardie writes:

The blueberry honey that we are sharing this week with Pete’s Greens comes from our friends in Quebec. It is the most remarkable blueberry honey that I have ever tasted. The blueberry flower is smaller than a honey bee, and in many seasons, the bees do not gather any “surplus” honey for their hives. In the last two years, the honey from the bees on blueberries has had between 10% and 30% blueberry honey in it. My sense is that this year the honey could be between 90% or more blueberry honey. The honey bees always go to the flowers that have the sweetest nectar in their neighborhood, and so depending on the season, with the blooming of flowers in a particular neighborhood, and the sun and the rain, the composition of blueberry honey is always different. Thank you for your support of the honey bees and those that work in agriculture. ~Todd

Storage and Use Tips
There are many, many storage and use tips on our blog for pretty much anything we have ever grown, you can enter veggie names in the search box to find info. Very soon we will be finished creating a new veggie info and recipe section on the website site which will be much more user friendly. Can't wait until it's finished! Until then please visit our blogspot if you want to know more about something in the share.

Kohlrabi
- The name means cabbage turnip in German and that is a pretty accurate description. It is a member of the cabbage family and its outer skin would attest to that. The greens look more like turnip greens however and the inner bulb can be a bit fibrous, like turnip. Raw, it is crisp, sweet, and clean, strikingly reminiscent of raw broccoli stalks. Cooked, it touts a mild, nutty, cabbage-like flavor that adapts beautifully to many cooking styles. It can be eaten raw and is great in salads and slaws. I can also be boiled, steamed, baked, roasted, etc. The greens may be eaten cooked like turnip greens or any other cooked greens. To prepare the bulb, cut off the leaves and stems. Use a vegetable peeler to pare off the tough outer layer. Or use a chefs knife to slice it off. Dice or shave up the inner bulb according to your recipe. Store loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge.


Recipes

Holy Brassicas! We have quite a showing from the veggie family that takes top rankings for health attributes. Brussels sprouts, broccoli, Napa cabbage, kohlrabi and pac choi - all are super healthy and packed with vitamins and cancer fighting goodness. I have selected recipes this week that highlight these power veggies.

Vegetable Strudel
This is a delicious dish from Mollie Katzen's Enchanted Broccoli Forest. Makes great leftovers and you can also freeze leftover squares and they re-bake beautifully. Serves 6-8.

1 tablespoon butter
2 cups minced onion
1 large carrot, diced
3 cups shredded cabbage
2 cups chopped broccoli
1/2 lb. mushrooms, minced
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
4 cloves garlic, minced
1-2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 tablespoon minced fresh dill
5 scallions, minced
fresh black pepper to taste
1 cup crumbled goat cheese or feta cheese
3/4 cup fine bread crumbs

1/3 to 1/2 c olive oil
1 lb. filo dough

Options: substitute some thinly sliced kohlrabi or Brussel sprouts here for some of the broccoli or cabbage.
For a lighter dish, use less layers of filo dough.


Preheat the oven to 375°F. Have ready a 9" x 13" baking pan.

Melt butter in a large deep skillet or Dutch oven. Add onion, and cook for 5 minutes. Add carrot, cabbage, broccoli, mushrooms, and salt. Cook over medium heat until vegetables are just tender. Remove from heat. Stir in the caraway, garlic, lemon juice, dill, scallions, black pepper, cheese, and 1/2 cup of the bread crumbs.

Brush the pan with a little olive oil. Lay a sheet of filo in the pan and brush lightly with oil. Repeat this until you have a stack of about 12 layers. Sprinkle the stack of fill with the remaining bread crumbs, then add the filling, spreading it to within 1/2 inch of the edges. layer more fill over the filling, brushing each layer with olive oil, including the very top. Use the entire box of fill.

Cut unbaked strudel into squares and bake at 375 for 35 minutes or more until crisp and to desired brownness.

Lotus and Linguine with Wok-Fried Vegetables and Peanut Sauce
Peanut sauce drizzled over hot noodles and crispy wok-fried veggies makes a nourishing dinner. Leftovers become a welcome lunch. Adapted from the Rebar Modern Food Cookbook by Audrey Alsterberg & Wanda Urbanowicz. Serves 4.

1 recipe Peanut Sauce (below)
1 lb linguine noodles
1 TB sunflower oil
1 yellow onion, sliced
2 carrots, half moon slices
2 large red peppers, 1/2" triangles
1 Bunch Broccoli, florets and stem slices
1-2 Kohlrabi (tough outer skin discarded, and interior sliced thin)
1 small head Pac Choi or Napa Cabbage or combo, roughly chopped
2 bunches scallions, 1 inch long slices
sesame oil
optional: chopped peanuts, lime wedges

For the Peanut Sauce
1/4 c. smooth, natural peanut butter
2 cloves garlic
1 TB minced ginger
2 TB honey
1/4 c. minced cilantro (got any left from last week?)
juice of 1 lime (or a good splash from a bottle)
1 TB sesame oil
1 tsp sambal oelek (or substitute equivalent fresh hot red chile and a pinch of salt)
1/4 c. tamari or soy sauce
2 TB rice wine vinegar

In a food processor or blender, add all the ingredients through the sambal oelek or chili pepper and blend until smooth. Then add remaining ingredients and blend, seasoning to taste.

Peanut sauce tips - you may want more heat (peppers), or more or less ginger, or more or less cilantro. Make this to your liking! Also, this sauce will thicken a lot in the fridge. You can loosen it up by stirring in a little water or stock, or heat on stove top (or in microwave). Y0u can make this sauce a lighter creamier sauce by adding lite coconut milk in a 1:1 ratio.

For the Stir Fry
Heat a large pot of water for cooking the pasta. Begin cooking the noodles when you start your stir fry. The will take about the same amount of time. Have a colander ready to drain the noodles. Meanwhile in a small pot gently heat the peanut sauce, adding water to thin if necessary.

Heat a wok or deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil and when very hot, add onion and a pinch of salt. Stir fry the onion until translucent and then add remaining vegetables in order of their cooking times, beginning with carrots and ending with .., bok choy and scallions. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Continue tossing and stirring, keeping them crisp and brightly colored. If they start to stick, add a splash of water and cover briefly.

Toss the drained noodles with a splash of the sesame oil. Divide the noodles among the plates, top with vegetables and drizzle with warm peanut sauce. Garnish with chopped peanuts, freshly chopped cilantro, and a lime wedges, if desired.

Napa Cabbage,
Kohlrabi, Carrot Slaw
Adapted from a recipe in Bon Appétit July 1998.

3 tablespoons rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2.5 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
1.5 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
1.5 tablespoons (packed) brown sugar
1 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoons minced garlic

1 Napa Cabbage chopped
2 kohlrabi peeled and cut into matchstick size strips
1 large red or yellow bell peppers, cut into matchstick-size strips
2 medium carrots, peeled, cut into matchstick-size strips
4 scallions, cut into matchstick-size strips
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Whisk first 7 ingredients in small bowl to blend. (Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before continuing.)

If you have a food processor you can use it to grate the carrots, kohlrabi and cabbage and peppers. Otherwise hand chop and mix together in a large bowl. Add dressing and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Braised Brussels Sprouts in Maple Mustard Glaze
From the book The Vegetable Dishes I Can’t Live Without by Mollie Katzen.
Serves 4 to 5.

2 TB olive oil (or sunflower!)
¼ cup minced onion
4 c/1 lb Brussels sprouts, halved or quartered lengthwise (or left whole, if tiny)
½ tsp salt
4 to 6 TB water
¼ c. Dijon mustard
2 TB maple syrup
freshly ground black pepper

Place a medium-sized skillet over medium heat. After about a minute, add the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the onion and sauté for 3 to 5 minutes, or until it begins to soften. Add the Brussels sprouts and salt, and sauté for 5 minutes. Sprinkle in 4 tablespoons water, shake the pan, and cover. Cook over medium heat for about 5 to 8 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts are bright green and fork-tender. (You might need to add another tablespoon or two of water during this time to prevent sticking. Just keep your eye on it, and your fork intermittently in it.) Using a small whisk in a medium-small bowl, beat together the mustard and maple syrup until smooth. Add this mixture to the pan and stir to combine. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature, topped with a shower of fresh black pepper, if desired.

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Good Eats Newsletter - September 23, 2009

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains
Baby Arugula; 1 lb Red Onions; 3 lbs mixed Potatoes; 1 Bunch of Beets with Greens; 2 lbs Green, Red, or Savoy Cabbage; 1 lb of Romanesca Cauliflower; 1 lb of Broccoli; 1.5 lbs of Tomatoes; 1 Bunch of Cilantro plus ...

1 Bag of Tomatillos -or- Husk Cherries

Please Take Note!
The Tomatoes will be packed in a paper bag as usual.

In addition, the Tomatillos or Husk Cherries will be
in a second paper bag
WITH A BLACK STRIPE ON IT.

Localvore Share Members Also Receive
Red Hen Cyrus Pringle Bread
Vt Soy Maple Ginger Baked Tofu
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs
Butterworks Whole Wheat Bread Flour (or Milanaise)


Pete's Musings
We had a great time with Emeril last week. He is a really down to earth guy, very curious about our farm and the other operations in the area. He did some pickling in the kitchen with Nick, and toured the farm harvesting potatoes and daikon with me. Classy crew, everybody was great to deal with. The show will air on his Emeril Green show on the Discovery channel in several months to a year. We'll keep you posted.

Several of you have commented to me in the past few weeks how much you have enjoyed your Good Eats shares. Putting together the share ingredients is one of the behind the scenes tasks that Meg does. She has taken over much overall general farm management, particular organizational tasks that I am not very good at. She organizes daily and weekly harvest schedules, runs farmers market, manages the farmstand, and works with me on long term planning for the farm. I realize how much she is doing when we decide to leave the farm for a couple days. Meg spends a couple hours writing lists and organizing the work for when we are gone, while my preparation is much easier.

Onions are in the greenhouse drying nicely. Awesome day harvesting them with the crew last Wedneday. We harvested and had under cover over 2 acres in a day. ~ Pete




















The Emeril Planet Green film crew at the Lakeview Dinner.
Emeril with some of the Board Members for the Center for Agriculture: L-R, Tom Stearns (High Mowing), Andrew Meyer (Vt Soy), Emeril Lagasse, Pete Johnson, Andy Kehler (Jasper Hill).


VPR interview with Emeril

Jane Lindholm interviewed Emeril asking why he decided to visit Pete's Greens, High Mowing, Vermont Soy, Claire's, Jasper Hill and the Hardwick/Greensboro/Craftsbury community to film what's happening here for his Planet Green Show.
Click here to hear the interview.

Support the Farm Share Program - Shop or Dine on Oct 1
NOFA-VT's Share the Harvest Event
Each year for one day area restaurants that participate in Share the Harvest generously pledge 15% of their sales to support NOFA-VTs Farm Share Program. The Farm Share program enables limited income Vermonters to purchase a CSA share from a local participating farm by subsidizing up to 50% of the cost of the share. NOFA's annual Share the Harvest event is the sole fund raiser for the matching funds that NOFA contributes to the Farm Share program. Farm Share's ability to help people is dependent on the success of this event. So make your plans to dine out on October 1st. Or structure your week so that you can do your grocery shopping that day! A full 15% of what you spend that day will be donated to the program. The list of participating businesses can be found on the NOFA-VT website.

Fall/Winter share begins in just 3 weeks!
The sign up forms are rolling in now. Do we have yours yet? Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form. Plus, folks who sign up early may receive a colorful Pete's Greens T.

Looking to split your share?

If you are looking for someone to split a share with someone this Fall, maybe we can help. On our Members Seeking page, we post requests from people looking to split shares or share pick up duties etc. It's not an interactive page, so please email me if you'd like to have a message posted there.


Sign Up Early and Receive a Pete's Greens T-Shirt
The 1st 100 people who sign up and pay in full will receive a free Pete's Greens T shirt!

Summer and Summer Meat Share
We will continue to sign new members up for remaining summer share and meat share deliveries.
Summer Share
Meat Share

Pete's Pastured Chicken
Fill your freezers soon! Chicken orders will be available through October. You can now order as few as 3 chickens and have them delivered to your Good Eats pick up site. Visit the Pastured Chicken page for order info including available delivery dates and to download an order form. These are great tasting chickens raised on an abundance of greens and grass throughout their lives. This is healthy, nutritious, vitamin packed meat that you can feel great about eating. Only $3.75/lb.

Localvore Lore

Randy George at Red Hen Baking Co. is working to perfect his new all Vermont flour Cyrus Pringle bread.
We’re getting more familiar with this bread as we work with it and have made some very small refinements that we think make it even better. Since we plan on making this a regular bread, we’re interested in what you like or don’t like about it and if there is anything about it that you’d like to see changed. ~ Randy

We'd love to hear your feedback on this bread made with fresh local Vermont grown wheat. Please e-mail us with your comments.

We have Vermont Soy's Maple Ginger Baked Tofu again for you this week but in its original freshly baked state. If you'd like to try making yourself some of that delicious fried tofu, there's a recipe provided below. This baked tofu is good on its own, or in stir fries, salads, and sandwiches. It's delicious.

I don't know about you, but with the change in the air this week it's starting to feel a lot like baking weather. To satisfy the urge, we have included local bread flour from Butterworks Farm plus a recipe for Honey Molasses Whole Wheat Bread below. And eggs from Pa Pa Doodles Farm too!


Recipes
VT Soy Baked & Fried Maple Ginger Tofu
For those of you still salivating over the fried tofu from a couple weeks back, here's the way back to nirvana.

Vt Soy uses organic soy oil, but canola or sunflower oil work well too. Heat the oil in a pot to 350 degrees, make sure there is enough oil to cover the pieces of tofu you are frying. Cut the Tofu into cubes or strips depending on your preference. Fry the tofu until it floats and browns. Scoop the tofu out of the hot oil using a utensil that allows the oil to drain away from the tofu. Place tofu on paper towels.

Potato Pancakes
I love that this recipe makes use of leftover mashed potatoes. The recipe calls for baking the pancakes but these can be done the old fashioned way too - frying in a little butter or oil on the stove top. Tomatilla salsa on the side?

1/4 cup butter
3 large onions, finely chopped
4 large eggs
3 cups mashed potatoes
1/2 cup flour
salt and pepper
Tabasco sauce or a little heat from another source
2 tablespoons water

Preheat oven to 375°F. In large skillet, melt the butter, then add the onion and cook over moderate heat for 3 minutes, stirring. Remove from heat.
In a large mixing bowl, whisk three of the eggs till well blended, then add the cooked onions, potatoes, flour, salt, pepper, Tabasco and stir until mixture is firm.
Form the mixture into 16 round pancakes and place on a large greased baking sheet.
In a small bowl, whisk the remaining egg with the water, brush the top of each pancake with the egg wash, and bake the pancakes till golden brown, 20-25 minutes.

Fresh Tomatilla Salsa
Gourmet September 2007. Makes about 1 cup.

1/2 pound small fresh tomatillos, husked and rinsed
1 large garlic clove
1 tablespoon chopped fresh Jalapeno or Cayenne pepper with seeds, or to taste
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
2 tablespoons water

Coarsely chop tomatillos, then purée with remaining salsa ingredients and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a blender until smooth.

Tomato and Tomatillo Gazpacho
Gourmet September 2009 by Andrea Albin.

1/2 pound fresh tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered
1 1/2 pounds tomatoes, chopped, divided
1/2 cup chopped white onion, divided
1 (or to taste) fresh Jalapeno or Cayenne pepper, coarsely chopped, including seeds
1 garlic clove, quartered
2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
1 cup water

Puree tomatillos, half of tomatoes, and half of onion with chile, garlic, vinegar, and 1 1/4 teaspoons salt in a blender until smooth.
Force through a medium-mesh sieve into a bowl, discarding solids.
Stir in remaining tomatoes and onion, water, oil, and cilantro. Chill until cold, at least 1 hour and up to 4 hours.

Pirozhki
I like the fact that these little Russian pastries can be made ahead and frozen. You can take the frozen pastries out of the oven and bake them when you need a quick no prep meal. Gourmet February 1992.

For the dough
2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 sticks (3/4 cup) cold unsalted butter, cut into bits
2 large egg yolks
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon cold water if necessary

For the filling
3/4 pound baking potatoes
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 onion, chopped fine
3/4 teaspoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon butter (or oil)
3 cups chopped cabbage
3 tablespoons sour cream
2 tablespoons water if necessary
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill
an egg wash made by beating 1 large egg with 1 teaspoon water

Make the dough:
In a food processor blend together the flour, the baking powder, the salt, and the butter until the mixture resembles meal. In a small bowl whisk together the egg yolks and the sour cream, add the sour cream mixture to the flour mixture, and blend the mixture until it just forms a dough, adding the water if the dough seems dry. Divide the dough into fourths, form each fourth into a flattened round, and chill the dough, each round wrapped well in wax paper, for 1 hour or overnight.

Make the filling:

Peel the potatoes, cut them into 3/4-inch pieces, and in a steamer set over boiling water steam them, covered, for 12 to 15 minutes, or until they are very tender. Force the potatoes through a ricer or food mill into a bowl and stir in 1 tablespoon of the butter. In a heavy saucepan cook the onion and the caraway seeds in the remaining 1 tablespoon butter and the oil over moderate heat, stirring, until the onion is golden, add the cabbage, and cook the mixture, stirring, for 5 minutes. Cook the mixture, covered, over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes more and stir it into the potato mixture with the sour cream, the water if the mixture is too thick, the dill, and salt and pepper to taste. The filling may be made 1 day in advance and kept covered and chilled.

On a lightly floured surface roll out 1 piece of the dough 1/8 inch thick, keeping the remaining pieces wrapped and chilled, and with a 3-inch cutter cut out rounds. Brush each round with some of the egg wash, put 2 level teaspoons of the filling on one half of each round, and fold the dough over the filling to form a half-moon, pressing the edges together firmly to seal them and crimping them with a fork. Gather the scraps of dough, reroll them, and make more pirozhki with the remaining filling and dough and some of the remaining egg wash in the same manner. The pirozhki may be made up to this point 5 days in advance and kept frozen in plastic freeze bags. The pirozhki need not be thawed before baking.

Arrange the pirozhki on lightly greased baking sheets and brush the tops with the remaining egg wash. Bake the pirozhki in preheated 350°F. oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until they are golden, and serve them warm or at room temperature.

Honey Molasses Whole Wheat Bread
This 5 star recipe was submitted by Karen to the website Recipezaar. Rave reviews for flavor, and ease of the recipe, and dependability. Makes four "9x5 loaves" and these loaves freeze well.

2 envelopes yeast
4 cups water
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/4 cup molasses
1/2 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
6 cups whole wheat flour
4 cups white flour

Dissolve yeast in warm water.
In a large bowl, combine butter, molasses, honey and salt and mix well.
Add yeast mixture and then gradually add flours.
Turn onto floured surface and knead until smooth.
Place in buttered bowl and let rise until double.
Punch down and let rest for a few minutes.
Divide dough into 4 parts and shape into loaves.
Place in greased pans and let rise for about an hour.
Bake at 375 for 35 to 40 minutes.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Good Eats Newsletter - September 16, 2009

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains
Mesclun Greens; 2 lbs Walla Walla Onions; 1 lb Summer Squash/Zucchini (may be a mix of types); 1 Bunch of Green Kale; 1 lb Green Peppers; 1 lb mix of Romanesca Cauliflower and Broccoli; 1 large or 2 small Honeydew Melon or Canteloupe; 1 Bunch of Flat Leaf Parsley; Beefsteak Tomatoes plus...

1 pint of Husk Cherries -or- 1 Pint Strawberries

Localvore Share Members Also Receive
Vermont Cranberry Co Dried Cranberries
Pete's Sour Pickles
Red Hen Cyrus Pringle Bread!


Storage and Use Tips
Husk Cherries - Included in today's share is a pint box full of little papery husked things that look like tomatillos. In fact they are close cousins of tomatillos and are also related to tomatoes. But they are sweeter and have a diiferent flavor than either. Some liken their taste to vanilla, others to cinnamon bread (!). They are tasty little treat and will be wonderful on your salads this week. They would also be welcome in any dish that cries out for a touch of sweetness. If you don't eat them all straight out of the box.

Pete's Musings
Contrary to what you might have heard this farming life is just one big party. On Saturday we had the Vermont Land Trust annual meeting at Jasper Hill Farm in Greensboro. Attendees toured local ag operations, swamps, woodlands and other notable features of the Northeast Kingdom in the morning, and then enjoyed music and a great local lunch under a tent in the afternoon. Several of us were on a panel discussing our businesses and the future of farming in Vermont. The future of farming in this State is pretty clearly small, diversified operations serving our local market and the huge regional markets that are nearby. Land access is a major impediment to starting these operations and the Land Trust can play an important role in getting farmers onto land.

On Sunday High Mowing Seeds in partnership with Center for an Agricultural Economy and NECI held their annual field days at their trial gardens in Wolcott. Great weather, people, food, and beer. I'd recommend putting this free event on your calendar for next year.


This is Emeril week in the Hardwick area. He is coming to film several episodes for his Emeril Green show. His staff has already been to the farm a bunch of times and they are planning to film here Tuesday and Thursday. They are very nice bunch of folks. Emeril's planning to harvest some onions and make some root kraut while on our farm and they are interested in including as many of our beat up farm trucks in the scenes as possible.

Hope you can get outside and soak up some of the September rays this week. ~ Pete

























Pete's New Potato Digger

This is a cool new implement that Pete was testing out last week. He worked with a small farm implement company to invent it. It digs the potatoes or in this case onions, it sifts the soil from them as the vegetables rumble across the flat conveyor belt, and then drops the veggies on top of the soil where they can dry and cure in the sun. When the crops are ready to be brought in from the fields, Pete will install the people platforms that bolt onto the sides and the platform will skim along less than a foot from the soil level. As Pete drives really slowly, people on the platform will be able to sort and bag the vegetables as they cross over the conveyor belt which means that people don't have to bend over to pick up all those onions and roots.


New Richmond Site Added for Fall
On the Rise Bakery in Richmond has been added to our delivery route for the Fall/Winter Share! We are excited to have an option again for folks there. Ben and Rachel, owners of On the Rise Bakery, are looking forward to hosting the site and baking the localvore breads that go into the Richmond shares. If you live in the area or know people who do, please spread the word about the new site. We are really hoping for a solid number to start the share there and will need good membership to keep the site next Spring and Summer.

Montpelier Mud replaces May Day Studio for Fall Share

It's official. Montpelier Mud, a pottery studio owned and run by Mike Sullivan, will replace May Day Studio as site host beginning Oct 14th. Montpelier Mud is located right on River St down the street from May Day. The hours will be a little later than May Day - 11 am to 9 pm. Mike has been a Good Eats share member off and on and is excited to have the share move to his place! If you sent in your form with the "Site TBD" circled, and if you were previously a May Day member, I have selected Montpelier Mud as your site. If you'd prefer National Life, just send me an email and I'll switch you.


New Burlington Site?
I am interested in exploring options for a new Burlington site. Presently we have great site hosts at Adams Court and Grove Street but I think the community could support a share closer to the downtown area. If any of you have ideas for potential site hosts, please share. I am particularly interested in finding a downtown business that would like to have us deliver weekly but would definitely consider a residence as well.

We look for sites that have space to develop the share; that have ample and easy parking for our truck to unload and for members to park and pick up; and that have minimal stairs for Tim to climb on delivery. Site hosts receive compensation in the form of reduced price or free share depending on how many members they have at their site. If a site host has over 1o members, their own share is half price. If over 20 members, their own share is free!

If you are interested in becoming a site host I'd be happy to explore that possibility with you.

Fall/Winter share is now 4 weeks away
The sign up forms are rolling in now. Do we have yours yet? Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form. Plus, folks who sign up early may receive a colorful Pete's Greens T.

Looking to split your share?
If you are looking for someone to split a share with someone this Fall, maybe we can help. On our Members Seeking page, we post requests from people looking to split shares or share pick up duties etc. It's not an interactive page, so please email me if you'd like to have a message posted there.


Sign Up Early and Receive a Pete's Greens T-Shirt

The 1st 100 people who sign up and pay in full will receive a free Pete's Greens T shirt!

Summer and Summer Meat Share
We will continue to sign new members up for remaining summer share and meat share deliveries.
Summer Share
Meat Share


Pete's Pastured Chicken

Fill your freezers soon! Chicken orders will be available through October. You can now order as few as 3 chickens and have them delivered to your Good Eats pick up site. Visit the Pastured Chicken page for order info including available delivery dates and to download an order form. These are great tasting chickens raised on an abundance of greens and grass throughout their lives. This is healthy, nutritious, vitamin packed meat that you can feel great about eating. Only $3.75/lb.

Localvore Lore
We have a new batch of pickles for you straight from the Pete's Kitchen. Nick made these pickles several weels ago and we think they are delicious. They are sour pickles preserved with vinegar rather than brine cured. They are crunchy and sweet and sour and will pucker the most stalwart face. Enjoy.

Very exciting news this week from Randy George at the Red Hen Baking Co...
Only a few weeks ago, I was still saying that we were years away from baking a bread made exclusively from Vermont-grown wheat.

Well, I am happy to say that I couldn’t have been more wrong. Two weeks ago, Champlain Valley Mills (from Westport, N.Y., on the west side of Lake Champlain) milled 3000 lbs. of flour from wheat brought to them by Tom Kenyon of Aurora Farms in Charlotte, VT. This was the third year in a row that Tom had attempted to grow hard red winter wheat (the type needed for bread making) for us. The first two years yielded nothing but cattle feed, but the initial tests results from this year’s wheat looked good enough to try milling it and making bread with it. Being accustomed to baking with the finest organic wheat Kansas has to offer, I was hopeful that we could use a percentage of this Vermont wheat in some of our breads. Imagine my surprise when I combined this flour with water, yeast, and salt in the mixing bowl and found that it made a familiar-feeling dough! The resulting bread, although not perfect, was surprisingly good. A week later we are making bread that is beyond my wildest dreams of what we could do with an indigenous Vermont bread. The addition of some whole wheat from our long-time supplier and friend Ben Gleason of Bridport adds to the Vermont pedigree and gives this bread a depth of flavor.

Within the next couple of weeks we will be unveiling this true Vermont bread as a daily variety in the stores that we service. In honor of Dr. Cyrus Guernsey Pringle (1838-1911), a renowned botanist and wheat breeder from Charlotte(whose wheat varieties are being revived today), we are naming this bread with (literal) roots in Charlotte simply Cyrus Pringle: From Vermont.

~ Randy

We have included some dried cranberries today from Cranberry Bob at the Vermont Cranberry Company. These are maple sweetened cranberries and will be delicious on salads and in baked goods, on your granola or oatmeal.

Recipes

Cranberry (or Husk Cherries!), Goat Cheese and Mesclun Salad
Try substituting this week's husk cherries in place of the cranberries! Adapted from Gourmet November 1995. Serves 4.

For vinaigrette:
1 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
.5 tablespoon tamari
freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

4 cups mesclun
.5 cup dried cranberries
3 ounces goat cheese, cut into pieces, at room temperature

Quick Moroccan Vegetable Couscous
Bon Appétit January 1996. Serves 2 but can be doubled.

1/3 cup sliced almonds
1 tablespoon olive oil
3 cups mixed cup-up vegetables (such as red onion, carrots, zucchini and cauliflower or broccoli)
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 cup dry white wine
1/3 cup golden raisins
3/4 cup vegetable broth

1/3 cup sliced almonds

One 5- to 7-ounce box couscous and lentil mix or other couscous blend

Place almonds in heavy medium skillet. Stir over medium heat until almonds are pale golden, about 4 minutes. Transfer almonds to bowl. Add oil to same skillet.Increase heat to medium-high. Add vegetables, cumin and coriander; sauté until vegetables just begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add wine and raisins. Boil until wine is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Add broth. Partially cover skillet; simmer until vegetables are tender, about 6 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
Meanwhile, prepare couscous according to package directions.

Mound couscous on platter. Spoon vegetable topping and juices over. Sprinkle with almonds and serve.

Spaghetti with Braised Kale
This is a really simple recipe but one that's tried and true. It does call for 2 bunches of kale, but substitutions of broccoli or Romanesca cauliflower would work nicely too to augment the vegetable portion. This is a mighty healthy dish. Bon Appétit October 2009 by Molly Wizenberg. Serves 4.

1 pound kale (about 2 bunches), large center ribs and stems removed, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
8 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1/2 pound spaghetti
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Finely grated Parmesan cheese


Rinse kale. Drain; transfer to bowl with some water still clinging.

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add chopped onion and cook until soft and translucent, stirring occasionally, about 6 minutes. Add sliced garlic and sprinkle with salt; cook until onion is golden brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add kale and remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and toss until wilted, about 3 minutes. Cover pot and reduce heat to medium-low. Continue cooking until kale is very tender, stirring occasionally and adding water by teaspoonfuls if dry, about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in medium pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup cooking liquid. Add cooked spaghetti to kale mixture in pot. Add lemon juice and 2 tablespoons reserved cooking liquid; toss to combine, adding more liquid by tablespoonfuls if dry. Sprinkle spaghetti with grated Parmesan cheese and serve.

Parmesan Cauliflower and Parsley Salad
Fried with a parmesan coating makes this dish pretty tough to resist! The parsley is refreshing and nutritious. Gourmet May 2006.

For salad
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 oz white mushrooms, thinly sliced
1 cup loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

For cauliflower
1 large eggs
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
10 oz cauliflower florets
1 oz Parmisan cheese, finely grated with a rasp
1/6 cup olive oil

Marinate mushrooms for salad:

Stir together zest, lemon juice, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk in oil until combined, then stir in mushrooms and marinate while panfrying cauliflower.

Blanch the cauliflower for 5-6 minutes in boiling water and then drain and cool and pat dry.

Panfry cauliflower: Lightly beat eggs with salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Add cauliflower and toss until coated well. Put cheese in a large bowl. Lift cauliflower out of egg mixture with a slotted spoon and transfer to cheese, tossing to coat. Heat oil in a 10-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat until hot but not smoking, then panfry cauliflower in 3 batches, turning occasionally, until golden on all sides, about 3 minutes per batch. Transfer with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain.

Finish salad:
Add parsley and cauliflower to mushroom mixture, tossing to combine.

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Good Eats Newsletter - September 9, 2009

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains
Mesclun Greens; 2 lbs Orange Carrots; Tomatoes; 1 Bunch of Red Bore Kale; 1 lb Green Peppers; 1 Bunch of Leeks; 1 Bunch of Sweet Salad Turnips; 1 Head of Garlic; plus...

1 Honeydew Melon -or- 1 Canteloupe -or- 1 Pt Strawberries
Localvore Share Members Also Receive
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs
Red Hen Corn Bread
Vt Butter & Cheese Company Chevre Log
Champlain Orchards Gingergold Apples


Portrait of a farmer with a spatula in his hand:
You Are Entering the Kitchen
By Julia Shipley

A hand-lettered sign taped to the door announces a few rules: “No dirty footwear, Clean up after yourself and Walk around to get to the front porch.” Whereas on any farm you might expect: a tractor, a greenhouse, a storage cooler, instead, behind this door you’ll find other agricultural implements including: a tilt skillet, a steam kettle and a 1930’s era dough mixer. Using these tools enables Nicholas Augsberger, a six year employee of Pete’s Greens, to finesse value added products for the Good Eats CSA members and farm stand customers. The culinary equivalent of a finish carpenter, on a recent Monday morning, Nick began his workday with two foot- stool sized tubs of basil, a Grecian urn’s worth of sunflower oil, a spatula and a Hobart food processor. But had it been a different Monday, one might have encountered him brining pickles using his wife’s family recipe or assembling a rainbow roots kraut, or preparing to process 200 chickens, or shredding zucchini into zucchini- bread sized portions…

“When I was a kid, the only thing I ate was fruit,” Nick says of his earliest food memories. But by way of explaining his indirect path from Wildlands Ecology major at Sterling College to Professional Foodie at Pete’s Greens, he cites his experiences working in the college’s kitchen. Though he was monitoring watersheds on Mount Mansfield for his senior project, he was also learning kitchen fundamentals from Paul Sweeny, a long time cook for the college, kitchen fundamentals, such as how to use a knife, and how to carve a turkey. At his girlfriend’s encouragement, he also took an off campus job at Pete’s Greens, back when it was based on farmer, Peter Johnson’s parent’s land in nearby Greensboro.

Since 2003, Nick has immersed himself in every aspect of the farm business: from field worker and wash-house crew to farmer’s market staff and restaurant sales representative to farm manager. However, concocting specialty products out of the high quality produce is what excites him the most.

This basil- sunflower oil puree product emerged after gleaning feedback in the staff kitchen. He set out sample variations of a basil pesto for the staff at Pete’s Green to determine the best proportion of ingredients. Inevitably each person preferred a different one. Responses ran the gamut from too much cheese to not enough cheese, too much garlic to not enough garlic. The excitement for Nick resides in designing a variety of signature value added products, but also engineering opportunities for consumers to be creative. With this concentrated basil base, CSA members can customize their pesto. For example, Nick likes his with BaileyHazen Blue Cheese, instead of a more traditional Parmesan.

And at the end of the day, Nick goes home to his own garden and continues experimenting. He picks zucchini at a mere two inches because he discovered his daughter, Sophia will eat it like a hot dog. He makes dilly beans, morrel mancotti, smoked turkey breasts, pork chorizzo... The possibilities are endless.

At his mother’s house there is a portrait of his maternal great grandfather, a Greek chef, sitting of front of a cooked turkey with a knife; here in the farm kitchen, Nick looks up from his food processor, and grins, his brown eyes twinkling, his wrist cocked over the pitcher with an emptied cruet of oil, “Now that’s me.”
Julia Shipley is a freelance writer and faculty in Sustainable Agriculture at Sterling College.


New Site Search for Fall/Winter Share
Most of our existing pick up sites will be continuing on with us through the winter with just one exception so far. In Montpelier, our long time faithful site host Kelly McMahon has decided not to host the share this Fall due to growing demands for space in her art studio. So we are searching for a good Montpelier site to compliment the National Life site also in Montpelier.

I am also exploring some other new site options for the Fall/Winter share period, including Richmond, Shelburne, Johnson, and perhaps Newport. If you have comments or ideas about these or other options, please email me. If you are interested in becoming a site host I'd be happy to explore that possibility with you. We look for sites that are centrally located; that are on or very close to our existing route; that have space to develop the share; that have ample and easy parking for our truck to unload and for members to park and pick up; and that have minimal stairs for Tim to climb on delivery. Site hosts receive compensation in the form of reduced price or free share depending on how many members they have at their site. If a site host has over 1o members, their own share is half price. If over 20 members, their own share is free!


Fall/Winter share is only 5 weeks away
If you missed the news last week, sign up has begun for the Fall/Winter share which begins October 14th. Pete has been planning and planting to deliver fantastic diversity this Fall/Winter share and it's time to get your sign up forms in. Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form. Plus, folks who sign up early may receive a colorful Pete's Greens T.

Looking to split your share?
If you are looking for someone to split a share with someone this Fall, maybe we can help. On our Members Seeking page, we post requests from people looking to split shares or share pick up duties etc. It's not an interactive page, so please email me if you'd like to have a message posted there.


Sign Up Early and Receive a Pete's Greens T-Shirt
The 1st 100 people who sign up and pay in full will receive a free Pete's Greens T shirt!

Summer and Summer Meat Share
We will continue to sign new members up for remaining summer share and meat share deliveries.
Summer Share
Meat Share









Please Consider a Donation to Farm Share
Feeding folks on a limited budget one share at a time

For the past couple of years, Pete's Greens has partnered with the Northeast Organic Farming Association's Farm Share Program. In 2008 and 2009, the program has helped 30 limited income families gain access to fresh local produce through a Pete's Greens Good Eats share. Eligible Farm Share recipients pay only 50% of the cost ofshare. The other 50% comes from donations - 25% from Pete's Greens member donations and 25% from NOFA. (NOFA's funds are raised from their annual Share the Harvest Event in which participating restaurants pledge a portion of the day's sales to the program.) The number of Farm Share grants Pete's is able to offer each share period depends entirely on the number of donations we receive from you, our members. Please consider a donation to the Farm Share program when you sign up for your own share. Your donation will directly fund a portion of a share for someone, and lots of small donations really add to make the difference.

"Thanks to our farmers and NOFA Vermont, our toddler is participating in a community where choosing healthy, local and organic foods is the norm. We would not have been able to afford our CSA share if it wasn't for our NOFA Vermont scholarship.” Sara L.


High Mowings Seeds Annual Field Days
and Young Farmer Mixer Sep 13

On Sunday, from 11:00 am on, High Mowing will hold their annual Field Days event. Beginning at 11:00 visitors can tour High Mowings 2 acre Trial & Showcase Garden, featuring labeled displays of over 800 vegetable, herb, and flower varieties. For gardeners this is an excellent opportunity to check out a wide range of options for future growing seasons. There are a couple of good workshops including a seed saving workshop midday. Later in the afternoon they are having a Local Foods Showcase (aka feast) followed by a bonfire and a Young Farmers Mixer, an event that provides an opportunity for young farmers from across Vermont to meet and trade farming ideas and challenges. This event is free and open to the public and will be a fun day for everyone involved. For more info, please visit the High Mowing website.


Pete's Pastured Chicken
Fill your freezers soon! Chicken orders will be available through October. You can now order as few as 3 chickens and have them delivered to your Good Eats pick up site. Visit the Pastured Chicken page for order info including available delivery dates and to download an order form. These are great tasting chickens raised on an abundance of greens and grass throughout their lives. This is healthy, nutritious, vitamin packed meat that you can feel great about eating. Only $3.75/lb.


Localvore Lore
Red Hen Baking Co. are back at it this week dreaming up new breads baked with entirely local ingredients.

This week’s bread is another take on the corn bread that we made a few months back. It features heirloom Wahpsie Valley cornmeal from Aurora Farms in Charlotte (the corn makes up 20% of the total dry ingredients). You can find this cornmeal for sale in stores under the Nitty Gritty Grains label. When we made this bread earlier, we soaked the cornmeal prior to putting it in the bread. This time we have put it in dry because we have come to like the slight crunch that this method gives the bread. (It’s quite finely ground, so it’s not a tooth-breaker.) Once again, we’ve formed this into a longer loaf (the French call it a batard) so as to produce more crust, which has a particularly nice corn flavor. ~Randy

From Vermont Butter and Cheese we have a log of their fresh chevre. Since sending this out in the Spring share I admit I've become a bit of an addict. I just have to have it in my fridge as a staple. I smear it on fresh bread, I eat goat cheese and tomato sandwiches, I crumble it into salads or onto pasta or cooked greens or in quiche. It always tastes so fresh and the little bite that goat cheese has really livens up many concoctions.

We also have Deb's eggs again this week, yay! I'd be intersted to hear comments from people regarding the frequency you'd like to receive eggs. We have been sending them out every other week this share. Is this enough? Should we send 2 of 3 weeks? Is this too much, should we go to every third week? Let me know what you think.

We are delighted to have some fresh Fall apples from Champlain Orchards. The Gingergolds in the share today are an early yellow apple with Golden Delicious lineage. This is a firm, juicy delicious dessert apple. Enjoy!


Recipes

Baked Kale and Turnips

1 bunch kale, large stems removed, roughly chopped
1 bunch spring turnips, cut into cubes
couple handfuls olives or capers, or a large, sliced
portabella mushroom
3 T olive oil
2-3 garlic cloves, chopped

Combine the ingredients in a covered, oven-safe cassarole
dish. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until the turnips and
kale are tender.
Kale with Sauteed Apple and Onion
This recipe calls for a Granny Smith which is really more of a baking apple. The Gingergolds in the share are a dessert apple but could be substituted. In any case, add the apples late in the game to prevent too much softening. Adapted from Gourmet Dec 2000.
1 Granny Smith apple
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, cut into 1/4-inch wedges
1/4 teaspoon curry powder (or double this amount depending on taste)
1 lb kale, tough stems and ribs removed and leaves coarsely chopped
1/2 cup water

Peel, quarter, and core apple, then cut into 1/4-inch-thick wedges.
Heat oil in a 5-quart pot over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté onion, stirring occasionally, until golden. Add curry powder and sauté, about 2 minutes.
Add kale and water and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until kale is tender and most of liquid is evaporated. Several minutes before the kale is finished, add your apples and cook until the apples are just beginning to soften.
Season with salt and serve.

Fall Vegetable Stew over Couscous
A one pot wonder of a dish that calls for many local vegetables. Leaving the roots on until after cooking keeps them from falling apart in the stew. Adapted from Parade magazine January 2001. Serves 3-4.
3 medium-sized leeks (4 inches of green left on),
.5 tablespoon white vinegar
1.5 quarts defatted chicken broth or vegetable broth
1 tablespoons olive oil
3 large fresh cilantro sprigs, rinsed, with roots and stems crushed
4 cloves of garlic, lightly bruised and peeled
1.5 cinnamon sticks (each 3 inches long)
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoons curry powder
1/8 teaspoon crumbled saffron threads
.5 teaspoon coarse salt
1 medium-sized zucchini, ends trimmed
3 medium-sized carrots, peeled, halved lengthwise and cut into 2-inch lengths
2-3 potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters
4 ounces small white turnips, peeled and quartered
2 medium yellow onions, peeled and halved
2 medium ripe tomatoes, cored and quartered
.5 cup chickpeas, rinsed
.5 cup pitted prunes, halved
1/4 cup golden raisins
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro or parsley
4 cups cooked couscous (1 1/3 cups dried), hot (optional)

Wash leek roots well and trim, leaving 1/4 inch of roots on the bottom of the bulbs. Set aside.

Prepare the seasoned broth: Combine the broth, oil, cilantro sprigs, garlic, cinnamon sticks, cumin, curry powder, saffron, and salt in a large heavy pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes.

Using a potato peeler, peel each zucchini lengthwise at intervals to make 3 or 4 stripes in the skin. Cut the zucchini into 1 1/2-inch lengths. Set aside.

Place the reserved leeks, the carrots, potatoes, turnips, and onions in the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Add the reserved zucchini, tomatoes, chickpeas, prunes, and raisins. Stir gently so that the vegetables don't break up. Simmer 30 minutes longer. Just before serving, remove the leeks carefully and trim off the roots close to the bottom of each white bulb. Gently heat the vegetables and broth through. Stir in chopped cilantro.

Cook the couscous according to directions. Spoon cooked couscous into each bowl, if desired. Top with the vegetables and broth. Garnish with the remaining tablespoon chopped cilantro.

Crostini with Roasted Garlic, Goat Cheese and Apple Chutney
Looking for a crowd pleasing appetizer? Here's one from 128 Cafe in St. Paul, Minnesota. From Bon Appétit October 1999. I love the use of chutney here (I love chutneys and try to put up several each fall) and the idea of smearing roasted garlic, goat cheese and this apple chutney on this week's hearty loaf.

1 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
3/4 cup rice vinegar
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cinnamon stick
1 1/2 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, cut into -inch pieces (about 4 cups)
1 cup golden raisins
1 cup diced seeded plum tomatoes
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint

1 French-bread baguette, cut into 1/3-inch-thick slices
Olive oil
Roasted Garlic
12 ounces soft fresh goat cheese (such as Montrachet), room temperature

To make the Chutney
Stir sugar and vinegar in heavy large saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Add next 4 ingredients and simmer until mixture is syrupy and reduced to 1/2 cup, about 8 minutes. Mix in apples and raisins. Increase heat to high and boil until apples are tender, stirring frequently, about 10 minutes. Cool to room temperature. (Chutney can be made 3 days ahead; cover and refrigerate.) Mix in tomatoes and mint.

To make the Roasted Garlic
Preheat oven to 350°F. Cut top 1/4 inch off heads of garlic to expose cloves. Place garlic in small baking dish. Add oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss to coat. Turn garlic cut side up. Cover tightly with aluminum foil. Bake until garlic skins are golden brown and cloves are tender, about 55 minutes. Cool. Squeeze garlic cloves from skins.

To assemble
Preheat oven to 450°F. Arrange baguette slices on baking sheet and brush with olive oil. Bake until golden and crisp, about 8 minutes. Spread each toast with roasted garlic; top with goat cheese and chutney.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Good Eats Newsletter - September 2, 2009

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains
Head of Lettuce; 2 lbs Mixed Potatoes; 1.5 lb Mixed Tomatoes; 1 European Cucumber or 2 nice Slicing Cucumbers; 1 lb Mixed Zucchini, Patty Pan and Summer Squash; 1 lb Mixed Pac Choi; 1 lb Walla Walla Onions; 1 lb Romanesca or Mixed Cauliflower; 1 Cayenne or Jalapeno Pepper; Sweet Corn (6 ears)

Localvore Share Members Also Receive
Elmore Mountain Country French Bread
VT Soy Maple Ginger Fried! Tofu
Les Aliments Massawippi Tamari

Hen of the Wood Members will also get the eggs they missed last week!

Meat Share Members
- reminder! This is a meat pick up week.

Pete's Musings
Secure your winter food supply! It's time to sign up for our October-February share period and it is going to be better than ever. Storage crops look great, we have big plans for our greenhouses, and the localvore offerings continue to increase in diversity. Join us on this local eating adventure and feed your family the best stuff from Vermont's soil. We appreciate your support as we strive to build a healthy, nutritious, people and land sustaining, year-round food system. ~Pete

Fall/Winter Good Eats Sign Up
Fall/Winter Good Eats sign up has begun! The harvest is coming along well and we'll have more diversity than in any previous Fall share. Last year we learned how to better utilize our moving greenhouses and we'll be growing baby greens in them into December. In addition, good friend and exceptional farmer Mike Collins will grow additional crops like head lettuce, chard and scallions in his greenhouses. Combined with our storage crops we will have an excellent mix of crops to offer.

Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form.

Sign Up Early and Receive a Pete's Greens T-Shirt
The 1st 100 people who sign up and pay in full will receive a free Pete's Greens T shirt!

We will continue to sign new members up for remaining summer share and meat share deliveries.
Summer Share
Meat Share






Tim Fishburne our wholesale sales and Good Eats

delivery person sports his Pete's Greens T.


Harvesting Optimism
Join Pete and the Vermont Land Trust for VLT's Annual Celebration

On Saturday September 12th, the Vermont Land Trust will hold their annual event from 9:30am - 2:30pm beginning at the Cellars at Jasper Hill in Greensboro. Field trips in the morning take attendees to businesses that have been integral to the Hardwick area renaissance, including Pete's Greens. Midday a panel featuring Pete, the Kelhlers of Jasper Hill, Andrew Meyer of Vermont Soy, and Tom Stearns of High Mowing will discuss the challenges they have faced and the opportunities that abound in the development of their farm based endeavors and a food based local economy. If you have been reading with interest all the stories about Hardwick, this is a great opportunity to meet the folks involved and hear about it all first hand. Fee is $25/person, children under 12 free.
For more information please visit the VLT website or email annie@vlt.org.

Celebrity Chef Emeril Lagasse visits in September

The interest in what's happening in Hardwick continues to spread and now Emeril Lagasse will come and film what's happening here for his Emeril Green program which focuses on healthful, organic food. Emeril will visit Pete's, High Mowing and Jasper Hill while shooting for several episodes of the program.

Pete's Pastured Chicken
Fill your freezers soon! Chicken orders will be available through October. You can now order as few as 3 chickens and have them delivered to your Good Eats pick up site. Visit the Pastured Chicken page for order info including available delivery dates and to download an order form. These are great tasting chickens raised on an abundance of greens and grass throughout their lives. This is healthy, nutritious, vitamin packed meat that you can feel great about eating. Only $3.75/lb.

Localvore Lore
Elmore Mountain Bakery have taken the time off from their oven project to bake for us this week. We have their Country French Loaf made with the Quebec Milanaise Winter Wheat, Rye Flour, Whole Wheat flour and sea salt and their sourdough yeast. It's a great standard loaf for all uses. How was the pizza dough last week? Would love to hear comments so please email amy@petesgreens.com if you have feedback.

The tofu in the share today is a special treat for you. Vermont Soy prepared Baked Maple Ginger Tofu and then fried it in organic soy oil. No kidding. This is not a standard product, they created this especially for Good Eats this week because a couple folks from VT soy have made it recently and it's so darn good, they decided to share.

Our Baked Maple Ginger Tofu is made with organic and wheat free ingredients that include, ginger, garlic, tamari, and Vt maple syrup. Our tofu in marinated, baked and then fried to deliver a crispy texture with a sweet and savory flavor. This is a ready to eat Tofu, enjoy it cold right out of the package, or serve it hot in your favorite stir fry dish.

And finally, we have some very special tamari for you. This is Les Aliments Massawippi's Miso Damari aka Tamari. A few weeks ago in the August 12th newsletter I shared with you the process of how Suzanne and Gilbert make their miso. The tamari is a continuation of that story. Remember how the miso sits and ferments in an anaerobic environment for weeks or years in its second fermentation? Tamari literally means liquid pressed from soybeans, and for centuries it meant the thick brown liquid that pooled in casks of fermenting soybean miso. This tamari was a rare delicacy reserved for special occasions. The tamari in the share today was made by this slow natural process. It is an unpredictable process in terms of flavor and yield. When I called Gilbert to ask if he had enough tamari I had to wait for him to press the miso before he could confirm that indeed he did.

Eventually producers learned to brew tamari-like liquid soy sauce that had similar characteristics as the original by-product of miso. Even most high end tamari is brewed from whole soybeans, sea salt, water, and koji (Aspergillus hacho) rather than pressed from naturally fermented miso. The newer method is a fast way to turn out a fairly consistent product that is similar but not nearly the quality of the real thing. Commercial soy sauces (even some labeled as shoyu or tamari) are another step down and are usually made from soybeans that have been defatted with hexane, a petroleum derivative. Other common shortcuts are artificial fermentation methods including genetically engineered enzymes. Most soy sauce is actually caramel colored water with lots of salt, hydrochloric acid treated soy isolate, and sugar added.

This tamari is pretty special and rare stuff, and it's a live food andhas never been pasteurized. This is a Soy Oats Barley Tamari and it is not the tamari pressed from the Japanese miso you received a couple weeks ago so the flavors in each will be distinct. Please transfer this miso to a small glass jar and for best quality store in your fridge. It will last a very long time.

Meat Share
Many thanks to everyone who took the time to help us by filling out the meat survey. We really appreciate the feedback and your comments will shape the meat share going forward. Somehow, through the comments of a few people in past months I had begun to think that the most important attribute of the meat share for people was value and as such I have tried to provide more value type cuts in the last couple shares. But from the results of the survey, it seems that though you want good value (who doesn't?), you also hope that we will introduce you to new producers, bring you meats out of the ordinary, things you can't just pick up anywhere, things you might not otherwise try. The survey also indicated that people are interested in more variety in the meats for the share - lamb, ground poultry and poultry parts, duck were popular choices. I am really looking forward to fulfilling these expectations. I have been talking to a number of new producers and in the coming months you can expect some great selections.

Pete's Greens Pastured Chicken
- Once again we have for you a whole chicken raised here on the farm. Our chickens spend their days doing exactly what chickens like best - foraging for bugs and seeds with lots of room to roam, feasting on greens and chicken feed, and lounging around under their shelter. The meat from pastured poultry is significantly higher in Omega 3 fatty acids and Vitamin A. It is also lower in fat. This is very, very healthy (and tasty) meat.

Applecheek Farm - Smoked Polish Sausage
This is a real treat. This sausage is a dry ready to eat delicious sausage perfect as an hors d'oevre or in a sandwich. We don't have many options locally for a sliced "deli" meat so I am thrilled that John and Rocio created this. Made with 80% organic beef, and 20% organic pork from the farm in Hyde Park.

Applecheek Farm - Veal Cutlets or Veal Sirloin Chops - Because the farm is on my way to Craftsbury I stop at the Clark's farm fairly often. It's peaceful, the animals are happy and well cared for, the cows always on beautiful pasture. Often, I have to park down the drive from the barnyard because the cows amble back to their pastures slowly on their own as they each finish up in the milking parlor using a lane that crosses the driveway. Some of the calves are alongside their mothers. The veal you are receiving today were raised alongside these happy mother cows in a great environment. The Clark's don't have a veal business, they have a really nice organic dairy. But male calves are part of the reality on a dairy. The veal in the share today comes from these calves raised on pasture and their mother's milk. Veal cutlets are the cut of meat used for veal parmesan and many other dishes, and the veal sirloin chops can be prepared many ways.

Shuttleworth Farm Ground Lamb - In Westfield, VT Todd and Kelli Shuttleworth raise entirely grass fed lamb, as well as beef, pork, and chickens. Their sheep receive nothing throughout their lives but their mothers milk, lush pasture, and the farm's own high quality hay in winter. The sheep are moved to fresh pasture every evening. This is very low fat healthy meat. Enjoy!

Recipes


Chinese Noodles with Golden Tofu and Pac Choi
A flavorful spicy fresh dish perfect for these nights with cooler temps coming on. If using the tofu from the share, you can skip the tofu prep here and just toss the Vt Soy Baked/Fried tofu right in at the end. You could toss this all together with cooked brown rice just as easily. From A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen by Jack Bishop.

1 lb fresh Chinese Noodles (or dried)
2 tablespoons plus 1 tsp sunflower oil
2 TB hoisin sauce
2 TB tamari
2 TB rice wine or sherry
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 TB gingerroot, minced
1 medium fresh chile, stemmed and minced
1 TB fermented black beans (optional)
8 ounces tofu
6 cups stemmed and thinly sliced Pac Choi

1. Cook the noodles according to the directions and then drain, saving 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Toss the noodles with 1 Tb of the oil to prevent sticking and set aside.
2. Whisk the reserved cooking water, hoisin, tamari, and rice wine together and set aside.
3. Place the ginger, garlic, chile and black beans in a bowl and set aside.
4. Heat the remaining 1 TB of oil in a large, deep non stick skillet over medium/high heat until shimmering. Add the tofu and cook stirring sdeveral times until the cubes are golden on most sides, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl.
5. Add the greens and 1/2 cup of water to the empty pan and stir fry until the greens have wilted and water has evaprated, about 1 minute. Clear the center of the pan and spread the garlic/ginger over the empty spot, drizzle the remaining 1 TB of oil over them, and cok until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir the mixture together with the greens. Add the noodles and the hoisin mixture using two forks to separate and spread the noodles around and mix until well coated and mixed together with the sauce and greens. Add the tofu and toss together to heat through. Serve immediately.

Indian Spiced Cauliflower and Potatoes
Gourmet Feb 2009.

1 large head cauliflower, cut into 3/4-inch-wide florets
1 1/4 lb Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
5 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 teaspoons minced fresh jalapeño, including seeds
2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 cup water

Accompaniment: lemon wedges

Put oven rack in upper third of oven and place a shallow baking pan on rack. Preheat oven to 475°F.
Toss cauliflower and potatoes together in a bowl with 3 tablespoons oil, cumin seeds, and1/4 teaspoon salt. Spread in hot baking pan and roast, stirring occasionally, until cauliflower is tender and browned in spots and potatoes are just tender, about 20 minutes.
While vegetables are roasting, cook onion, garlic, jalapeño, and ginger in remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until very soft and beginning to turn golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Add ground cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes. Stir in water, scraping up any brown bits from bottom of skillet, then stir in roasted vegetables. Cook, covered, stirring occionally, 5 minutes. Serve.

Potato, Cucumber and Tomato Raita
Raita is an integral part of an Indian meal. It can be prepared with raw and/or cooked vegetables. Often I make just a simple cucumber raita but I like that this recipe uses more ingredients from the share. If you want to save your potatoes and tomatoes there are lots of recipes for cucumber raita available on line.

4 large red-skinned potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 jalapeño chilies, seeded, chopped
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
3 cups low-fat (do not use nonfat) plain yogurt
1 English hothouse cucumber, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
3 large tomatoes, seeded, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
Fresh cilantro leaves

Cook potatoes in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 8 minutes. Drain potatoes well. Transfer potatoes to large bowl and cool.
Heat vegetable oil in heavy medium skillet over high heat. Add chopped onion and stir until beginning to brown, about 4 minutes. Add chopped jalapeño chilies and stir until beginning to soften, about 1 minute. Add mustard seeds and cumin seeds and stir until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Immediately pour onion mixture over potatoes and stir to coat. Mix in low-fat yogurt, cucumber and tomatoes. Season raita to taste with salt and pepper. Cover tightly and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours. (Raita can be prepared up to 6 hours ahead. Keep refrigerate.) Garnish raita with fresh cilantro leaves and serve.

Kefta and Zucchini Kebabs
With these distinctly Middle Eastern kebabs, the minty coolness of the yogurt sauce offsets the allspice, pepper, and cinnamon in some of the most succulent and juicy meatballs you have ever tasted. Gourmet January 2006.

For sauce
1 cup plain yogurt (preferably whole-milk)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/8 teaspoon salt

For zucchini
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/3 cup olive oil
2 medium zucchini (1 1/4 lb total), cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices

For kefta (lamb meatballs)
2 slices firm white sandwich bread, torn into small pieces
1 small onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
1/4 cup loosely packed fresh parsley leaves
1/4 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves
1 lb ground lamb (from shoulder)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/3 cup pine nuts, toasted and finely chopped

Special equipment: 12 (10-inch) wooden skewers, soaked in cold water for 30 minutes

Preparation
Make sauce:

Stir together yogurt, mint, garlic, and salt in a small bowl and chill.

Prepare zucchini:
Whisk together lemon juice, sugar, salt, pepper, and oil in a large bowl and stir in zucchini slices. Marinate at room temperature while making meatballs.

Make meatballs:

Cover bread with water in a bowl and soak 10 minutes. Squeeze handfuls of bread to remove as much excess water as possible, then transfer to a bowl. Pulse onion and herbs in a food processor until finely chopped, then add to bread along with lamb, salt, spices, and pine nuts. Mix with your hands until well blended. Form lamb mixture into 36 balls (1 scant tablespoon each).

Assemble and grill kebabs:

Prepare grill for cooking over medium-hot charcoal (moderate heat for gas; see cooks' note below). Thread 6 meatballs 1/4 inch apart onto each of 6 skewers. Thread zucchini lengthwise onto remaining 6 skewers (5 slices per skewer), so cut sides are on the grill, leaving 1/4 inch between slices. Grill zucchini and lamb on oiled grill rack, turning over once, until golden and just cooked through, 4 to 6 minutes. Serve warm, with yogurt sauce.

Broiling: Kebabs can be broiled on 2 large shallow baking pans 5 inches from heat, turning over once, until golden and just cooked through, 4 to 6 minutes.

Grilling procedure: · Charcoal grill: Open vents on bottom of grill, then light charcoal. When charcoal turns grayish white (about 15 minutes from lighting), hold your hand 5 inches above grill rack to determine heat for charcoal as follows. Hot: when you can hold your hand there for 1 to 2 seconds; medium-hot: 3 to 4 seconds; low: 5 to 6 seconds.· Gas grill: preheat burners on high, covered, 10 minutes, then, if necessary, reduce to heat specified in recipe.

Classic Veal Parmesan
In honor of Emeril's impending visit to the farm, I thought I should include something of his. Here's his version of the classic.

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups finely chopped onions
1/2 cup finely chopped carrots
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
Freshly Ground Black Pepper
Salt
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
1 cup dry red or white wine
2 (28 ounce) can of peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes
1 small can tomato paste
2 cups water
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons chiffonade of fresh basil
4 double-cut loin veal chops, bone-in, butterflied and pound out 1/4-inch thick
1 cup flour
Essence, recipe follows

2 eggs, beaten with 2 tablespoons milk
2 cups fine dried bread crumbs
1 pound fresh fettuccine
Mornay sauce, recipe follows
2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated

Directions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
In a large saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the onions, carrots and celery. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for 4 to5 minutes or until the vegetables are soft and clear in color. Add the garlic and red wine. Bring the liquid to a boil and reduce by half, about 2 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for 30 minutes.
Whisk the tomato paste and water together. Add to the tomatoes. Stir in the dried herbs. Bring the liquid to a boil, over high heat. Turn the heat down to medium-low and simmer for 4 hours, stirring occasionally.
Reseason with salt and pepper. Stir in the basil. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
Season the veal chops with salt and pepper. Season the flour with Essence. Season the egg wash with Essence. Season the bread crumbs with Essence. Dredge the veal chops in the flour. Dip each chop in the egg wash, letting the excess drip off. Finally, dredge the chops in the seasoned bread crumbs, coating completely. Add 1/4 cup of the oil to two large skillets. When the oil is hot, add two chops to each skillet. Pan-fry the chops for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until golden. Remove and drain on paper towels. Season with Essence.
Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Place the chops on a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 4 minutes, or until hot. Remove the pasta from the heat and drain. Drizzle the pasta with olive oil. Season the pasta with salt and pepper. Toss the pasta with the Mornay Sauce.
To serve, mound the pasta in the center of each plate. Lay the veal chop over the pasta. Spoon the sauce over the veal. Garnish with the grated cheese.

Essence (Emeril's Creole Seasoning):
2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme
Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or container.
Yield: about 2/3 cup