Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Good Eats Newsletter - June 20th, 2012




 
Welcome to Summer Good Eats!
 
The first pick-up is this Wednesday June 20th (for most sites)
or Thursday June 21st (for Lyndon Center, Newport, St J and Woodstock)
 
 
Localvore Members 
& Regular Veggie Only Share Members
take a LIGHT GREEN BAG
 
This week your bag will contain:
 
Mesclun, Head Lettuce; Red and/or Gold Beets; Euro Cucumber; Scallions; Pac Choi; Kohlrabi; Garlic Scapes, Curly Parsley
 
plus out of the bag...

Tomatoes (packed in small paper bags)
 
Localvore Offerings Include:
Elmore Mountain Bread
Sweet Rowan Farmers Cheese
Sunflower Oil
 
 
Small Veggie Only Members
take a YELLOW BAG
containing:
 
Mesclun Mix; Red Beets; Zucchini; Euro Cucumber; Pearl Onions or Yellow Storage Onions; Napa Cabbage, Garlic Scapes
 
SMALL VEGGIE ONLY SHARE MEMBERS - The Yellow Bag is the only item you should pick up tomorrow.
 
July 4th Week
 
We will be delivering to MOST sites as normal on Wed July 4th.
 
 
 
 
The following sites are closed on July 4th :
 
True Colors/ Montpelier
Concept 2/ Morrisville
Sweet Clover /Essex
 
We will deliver shares
to these sites on
Thurs July 5th
 
 
 
 
 
First Meat Share Delivery is July 4th
unless your share site is closed, see above
 
 
Our Weekly Good Eats Newsletter
 
Hello Everyone,
 
Welcome to the Good Eats Summer share.  Thanks for joining us! 
 
And welcome also to the weekly Good Eats Newsletter.  You'll receive this newsletter each Tuesday evening letting you know what to expect in this week's share. We also include storage and use tips, localvore information, recipes and anything else we think you might find interesting or useful. Pete and/or other crew members on the farm will often chime in with farm updates, thoughts and pleas for feedback.
 
The picking for the weekly share begins on Monday and the packing of shares is finished late Tuesday afternoon in order to give you extremely  fresh produce. Although we try to get the newsletter out just as early as we can, we do like to wait until the share is packed up and finalized. Sometimes there are last minute changes to the contents and we want to make sure that you have the right information to accompany your pick-up.
 If there are changes to the share that occur after the newsletter has been sent (which happens occasionally), you may receive a follow-up email Tuesday night or Wednesday.

If you have any feedback on the newsletter, recipe contributions or just general questions about the CSA, feel free to email me. 
We also post each newsletter on our blog and on our website. It generally gets posted to the web sometime on Wednesday or Thursday. You can also search our archive of recipes, farm stories and share contents at these sites.

Please add GoodEats@petesgreens.com to your address book to limit the possibility of having newsletters filtered as spam.
 
Feel free to contact me anytime with questions or comments about Good Eats.  ~ Amy
 
 
 
Picking Up Your Share
Please visit our Delivery Site page for pick up times and locations of pick up sites. If you have any questions about your pick-up please email us. The quickest way to reach me is really by email, but you may leave a message on voice mail at 802.586.2882 x2.
 
Share Pick-Up Instructions! Please review.
 
Whether you are a seasoned CSA share member or new to Good Eats, it's important to review the pick-up instructions before you head out to pick up your share!

Clipboard #1,
Find your name on the Names List - Find your name on the pick-up list and check it off.  The first clipboard contains a list of all share members at your site. Note that only one name is listed for each share. If you can't find your name on the list, look for your share partner's name (only one of you is listed). Checking off your name lets us know who has picked up and is extremely helpful in solving any mysteries at the end of the day. If you can't find your name or your share partner's name, please don't take a share! Call or email us and we'll figure it out.

Check your share type on the Names  List. Share types are Localvore, Localvore Vegetarian, Veggie Only, Small Veggie Only, Pete's Pantry or Meat Share. If you are listed incorrectly or have questions, let us know.

Clipboard #2,
Pick-Up Instructions - Select your items by following the Pick-Up Instructions. These are posted on the second clipboard. Follow the specific item list/instructions to assemble your share. The top section of the pick up list describes what to select for the vegetable portion of the  share. The bottom section of the Pick-Up Instructions lists the localvore (non-vegetable) items that Localvore and Pete's Pantry members should select.

If you are sharing a share with someone - coordinate with your share-mate to make sure that you DON'T take double the amount of any items. All shares are packed and delivered to the sites are whole shares.

Please note that the first Meat Share pick up is not this week, it is the first Wednesday of every month starting July 4th.

 
 
 
 
What To Do If You Have a Problem at Pick Up

Although we do our best to make sure that every delivery and pick-up goes smoothly, there are the occasional shortages and disappointments. Should you arrive at your pick-up site to find that your name (or share partner's name) is not on the list, one or more of your items are missing or that some of your produce is in unsatisfactory condition, please let us know right away!
 
Our goal is 100% satisfaction. If you email us (or call if you can not email) as soon as you discover the problem, we may be able to resolve it the same day or the following day. If you would like to receive an item that you missed at pick-up, you must contact us by Thursday morning.

If we have not heard from anyone, by Thursday afternoon our site hosts are instructed to donate leftover food, ensuring that they do not end up with bad food on their hands.

If we can not resolve your issue right away, email us to arrange a replacement or substitution.  These will generally come in the next week's delivery.
 
 
Storage and Use Tips
 
Each week I'll give you storage tips if there are veggies in the share some of you may not be familiar with.  Most of these tips are our website too, so please get acquainted with and bookmark the recipe and storage tip section of our website. I am sure you will find it useful.
 
Beets and Beet Greens - (All members) Our beets are absolutely beautiful right now.  A mix of red and gold beets will go out this week.  Both are delicious.  Right now while we are in full on gorgeous salad season I have been using up all my beets raw.  I have been grating them and placing them in a tupperware early in the week and then sprinkling them into salads all week.   Beet greens I have been tossing into any dishes I am cooking or more often than not, tossing them in my yogurt, banana, carrot, beet greens/chard smoothies. Yum.  Do separate beet greens from the beets and store each separately, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag. 
 
Kohlrabi  - (Regular Veggie/Localvore Bag) The name means cabbage turnip in German and that is a pretty accurate description. It is a member of the cabbage family and its outer skin would attest to that. The greens look more like turnip greens however and the inner bulb can be a bit fibrous, like turnip. Raw, it is crisp, sweet, and clean, strikingly reminiscent of raw broccoli stalks. Cooked, it touts a mild, nutty, cabbage-like flavor that adapts beautifully to many cooking styles. It can be eaten raw and is great in salads and slaws. It can also be boiled, steamed, baked, roasted, etc. The greens may be eaten cooked like turnip greens or any other cooked greens. To prepare the bulb, cut off the leaves and stems. Use a vegetable peeler to pare off the tough outer layer. Or use a chefs knife to slice it off. Dice or shave up the inner bulb according to your recipe. Store loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge, separate from the greens.
 
Pac Choi - (Regular Veggie/Localvore Bag) A member of the brassicas family along with cabbage and kale, pac choi (aka bok choy or Chinese cabbage) pac choi packs in nutrition with high scores for vitamins A and C and calcium. Pac Choi is mild enough to be chopped up for a salad, particularly if you give it a quick wilt in a hot pan. It's also great in stir-fries and sautes and in asian soups (and other soups too).  As leaves become more mature they are more often served cooked. Pac Choi has a mild flavor. The leaves taste similar to Swiss chard and the stems (called ribs) are deliciously crispy and can be substituted for celery in recipes. We grow both purple and green varieties. My favorite way to cook it is to halve or quarter it lengthwise (depending on the size), brush it with olive or sunflower oil and throw it on the grill. Prepared this way, it makes an excellent and easy side. Store pac choi loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
 
 
 
 
Garlic Scapes - (All Members) The curly soon-to-be-flowering-if-we-didn't-pick-them stalks that a garlic plant sends up at this time of year are a short season delicacy. With a mellow green but garlicky flavor, they can be eaten raw or cooked and are delicious added to many dishes. Add to stir fry recipes, pasta dishes, guacamole, salsas, vegetable dishes. They are also good in salads and on bruschetta & pizza and so many more ways.  You can also make a mild pesto with scapes.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Please share your comments about the veggie info you DON'T find, but wish was there!
 
 
 
 
 
 
Changes to Your Delivery?
If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let us know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or you can skip your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.
 
 
Localvore Lore
 
From Elmore Mountain Bread we have a new bread this week:
This week's bread is a honey whole wheat loaf mixed by our friend and fellow baker Cory Mast.  We met Cory last summer when he was riding his janky old ten speed around the Northeast checking out the abundance of wood-fired bakeries New England has to offer.  In the fall Cory will be baking at Tabor Bread, a new artisan bakery in Portland, Oregon.  To prepare for this new adventure Cory is hanging with us for the summer to practice his hand with a Turtle Rock wood-fired oven, try out some new recipes, and soak up the goodness of summertime in Vermont.  Cory's got a thing for whole grain breads and this honey whole wheat is a good example of the sort of bread he will be baking at Tabor Bread once he heads back West.  The ingredients are Milanaise Whole Wheat, Milanaise Rye, Milanaise Winter Wheat, Honey, Sea Salt and Sourdough. ~ Blair
 
And we are featuring a new cheese this week as well!  Farmer Paul Lisai started his grass based dairy Sweet Rowan Farmstead several years ago, working on his herd and and beginning to develop his producs.  He was off to a great start selling small batches of milk that he bottled in a rented creamery when that creamery burned in the Fall of 2011 (he shared that creamery space with Ploughgate, some of you may remember that cheese).  It was a blow, but Paul reorganized and built a creamery on his family farm and was up and running again with the new grass this spring.  Paul milks his small grass fed herd of Randall Lineback cows (a VT heritage breed) and sells his pasteurized milk direct to his customers.  It's great stuff, thick and creamy.  He also makes the farmer cheese that you will receive this week, delicious stuff that we all have been slathering onto sandwiches, crackers and bagels.  Most sites will receive a mix of plain and sundried tomato.  Enjoy!
 
The organic sunflower oil comes from John Williamson's State Line Farm in Shaftsbury, VT. This is a good all purpose mild flavored oil that you can use wherever a recipe calls for vegetable oil. We will send it in a plastic quart container, but we recommend transferring it to a glass container. If you will not use the oil quickly in your household, it's best to store it in the fridge. This is an unrefined product and it can spoil. In the fridge it will last indefinitely. It may get a little cloudy in your fridge but this is normal and the cloudiness will dissipate as it warms up. John and partner Steve Plummer did not start out with the intention to make sunflower oil for consumption but instead built Vermont's first on farm biodiesel facility pressing oilseeds grown on site to be used as bio fuel. But they are able to press the same seeds to create a very high quality oil for consumption, and we all are lucky beneficiaries. Photo at left of John's fields.

 
 
Recipes
 
Beet Green and Garlic Scape Bruschetta
Adapted from a recipe from Epicurious.

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

2 garlic scapes, sliced

8 ounces beet greens, stems removed, leaves sliced

8 1/2-inch slices good crusty bread/or 16 slices of baguette

coarse sea salt

Lightly brush baguette slices with 3 tablespoons of oil. Arrange in a single layer on baking sheet. Broil on high until lightly golden and toasted, about 1 minute. Remove from oven.

Meanwhile, heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and scapes and stir 15 seconds. Add greens and sauté until tender, about 3 minutes.
Place toasts on platter. Top with greens. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
 
Optional (but delicious!) - after toasting the oiled bread slices, add a smear of Sweet Rowan Farmstead cheese before topping with the greens mixture.
 
 
 
Kohlrabi Slaw with Ginger Dressing & Scallions
(Serves 2 as a side)
 
2 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled & julienned

1 large carrot, peeled & julienned

1/2 large cucumber, seeded & julienned

1 large scallion, sliced thin

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

Juice of 1 lime

1/2 tablespoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon mirin

1/2 teaspoon minced ginger

1 pinch salt

1 pinch sugar


In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, lime juice, oil, mirin, & ginger. Add salt & sugar to taste.
Peel & julienne the kohlrabi, carrot, & cucumber, or use grating blade of food processer. Slice the scallions. Toss all the vegetables together in a large bowl.
 
Add the dressing to the vegetables and mix all together until the vegetables are coated. Set aside in the fridge for at least 15 minutes. Right before serving, sprinkle with a pinch of salt & toss to combine.
 
 
Zucchini Garlic Scape Pesto
This recipe caught my eye and has been well reviewed.  It calls for more zucchini than you may receive, but don't let that stop you.  The concept is solid.  I hesitate to provide a garlic scape pesto recipe since you won't have loads of scapes to work with, but augmenting with the zuch and with the flavors of each?  it's perfect.
 
Spread this pesto on bread, or bruschetta, on pasta or rice, or gobble up on its own.

2-3 zucchini or summer squash
1 bunch garlic scapes
1 banana pepper, seeded, diced (you can skip this and use a small pinch of cracked red pepper)
1/3 cup olive oil (more or less)
Sea salt, cracked pepper
Few mint leaves (optional)
(if making pasta, reserve some pasta water and put it in)
 

Salt zucchini, allow to sit for 20-30 minutes. Use paper towels to absorb moisture. This is not so important if the zucchini are small. For this recipe medium size is preferred, but it truly doesn’t matter. I used all sizes and types in this recipe.

Saute all zucchini in olive oil on low heat, until soft, not mushy, but not crunchy. (not stir fry style).

In a food processor, add chopped scapes (cut off ends., salt, pepper, banana pepper. Pulse until scapes seem as small as you can get them, adding olive oil a little at a time. Add in cooked zucchini and process. You have to judge here if you need to have more olive oil, or salt, pepper, or cracked red pepper.
 
 
Beet and Kohlrabi Latkes with Horseradish Sour Cream 

Recipe
Small veggie only members, could make this with beets and zuch!
 
Sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
1-1/2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
1 scallion, chopped
pinch of salt

Latkes:
1 medium-small kohlrabi
1 large or 2 small beets
1 small onion
1 egg, beaten
2-3 tablespoons flour
salt and pepper
cooking oil

Mix sauce ingredients in a bowl. Peel kohlrabi, beets and onion. Coarsely grate the vegetables. Place them in a strainer and press out liquid. Transfer vegetables to a bowl and mix them with egg, flour, and salt and pepper to taste. The mixture should cling together loosely.
Heat a large, heavy skillet over medium flame for a few minutes. (Skip this initial heating of the skillet if it is nonstick.) Generously film the bottom of the skillet with cooking oil and let it heat until hot but not smoking. For each latke, spoon 1/3 cup of the mixture into the skillet and press it out flat. Fry latkes until cooked through, 5-7 minutes per side. Serve with sauce. Makes 2-4 servings.
 
 

Friday, June 15, 2012

Good Eats Newsletter - June 13, 2012


This is the LAST week of the Spring Good Eats Share
The Localvore Vegetable Share
is in the LIGHT GREEN BAG
and contains:
Leaf Lettuce; Chioggia Beets; French Breakfast or Easter Egg Radishes; Zucchini!; Pearl Onions; Red Russian Kale; Romaine Lettuce, Ruby Streaks Mustard, Cress, Potatoes
Localvore Offerings Include:
Pizza Dough
Amir Hebib's Mushrooms
Vermont Butter and Cheese Chevre
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs
The Spring Veggie Only Share
is in the YELLOW BAG
and contains:
Leaf Lettuce; Kohlrabi; Napa Cabbage; Red Russian Kale; Head Lettuce; Dandelion Greens, Cilantro; Strawberries
VEGGIE ONLY SHARE MEMBERS - You should look for your Yellow bag and a pint of strawberries.
There is still time 
to sign up
for Summer!
We have a new
NEW!  SMALL Veggie Only Share
NEW! 2 new pick up sites 

See news below
Thanks for joining us this Spring!
Many thanks to all of you for being with us for the Spring share and giving us the opportunity to feed you and your families.  We really appreciate your support and hope you have all been very happy with the share.  And, we hope you will be back with us again either this Summer or in Fall/Winter.  Please share the news about Good Eats with friends, family, co-workers.  Word of mouth is the most powerful means of spreading news about Good Eats.  We need your help to reach new members.
We need your feedback!  Later this week I'll be sending you all a simple end of share survey that I'd love for you to fill out.  We want to know how we did, what you liked, what you didn't so that we can improve for you all.  Please take a few minutes and tell us what you think when the survey comes your way.  Thank you! ~ Amy
Summer Good Eats News
This is it folks, the last delivery of the Spring share.  There is still time to sign up for Summer and receive the first share June 20.  Click here to check out share types etc.   
NEW SHARE TYPE  The Small Veggie Only Share that we introduced this Spring is being offered again for Summer.  At $22/week these smaller shares are great for small households and terrific for people starting out with a share.
NEW SITES!
St Johnsbury - Natural Provisions - Thursday delivery
Woodstock - FH Gillingham & Sons General Store - Thursday delivery, Veggie Only shares ONLY.
We are looking into sites in Middlebury, Jay Peak and Derby too.
If you have questions about summer or site suggestions, please email me! ~ Amy

Cooking for Craftsbury Kids 3
On Monday we delivered the third in a series of lunches we have prepared for the students in the Craftsbury school system.  This time, we brought the two schools a full salad bar with mesclun, carrots, radishes, tomatoes, pickled beets, potato salad, croutons, salad dressing all grown/made at the farm.  We were amazed at how little was left at the end!  Clearly much enjoyed by all.  Our little pilot project has gone really well and over the summer we will work with the school to plan a way for us to be involved in the most meaningful way we can next year.  This project has been a long time coming.  We were in planning stages for launch when the barn burned in early 2011, and it's taken a long time to be in a place where we could turn our attention back to it.  We are psyched.

Have you signed up for Summer?

We must receive your sign-up and payment in by June 16th
to get you started with the first delivery June 20th.
FIVE Share Types for Summer:
NEW!  Small Veggie Only - delivers a mix of weekly veggies, great for 1-2 people
Veggie Only - delivers a 30% larger weekly delivery of fresh, organic veggies from the farm.
Localvore Share -  delivers the same fresh vegetables as in the Veggie Only plus wonderful local staples and artisan products to fill your pantry. 
Pete's Pantry Share - just the localvore products, no veggies
Meat Share - delivers a monthly selection of local, pastured meats
Join now and be rewarded
with another healthy, local and delicious season of Good Eats!
Around the Farm
Scenes from the farm today...
In the field, Annie (pictured above at right) and the harvest crew of Molly (left) Noah (middle), Alejandra, Elena, and Socorro harvested bunches from different locations on the farm.  It was hot out there, so bins are picked and then ferried away quickly back to the washhouse where they are immediately chilled in a big water tank to zap the heat from the crops.  Meanwhile Isaac (above right) was modifying a tractor into a cultiavtion machine.  The cultivator he was welding on to this tractor had come off another tractor which was not functioning.  We can't be without cultivation so a solution was a high priority.  The cultivator was custom designed so a way to mount it on this tractor had to be custom designed too.  I saw Pete only once today on his back under this tractor exchanging repair ideas with Isaac.  The rest of the day he was on a tractor on another parcel.
Back in the washhouse, the dynamic duo of Jackson and Adan were steadfastedly washing all that the field crew brought through the door.  These two hold down the washhouse floor most of our four harvest days each week.  Jackson started at the farm in December.  Adan lives in Michoacan in Mexico and this his third growing season at the farm.  This year his son Hector (whose is a schoolteacher in Mexico) has joined him this year.
Zucchini started to come last week and now it's really cranking.  The field of Red Russian kale looked absolutely perfect.  In the greenhouses, tomatoes and basil are growing and ripening fast.  We started picking tomatoes for the farmstand last week.  We don't have enough for the share yet, but it won't be long now.  In the kitchen, Deb returned from Craftsbury lunch and moved on to packing up her pizza dough for localvore members this week.  Annie harvested a bunch of basil for kitchen use, so after pizza dough, Deb began making pesto for distribution later in Good Eats. 

Storage and Use Tips 
Pearl Onions - The little onions in the share this week are like little treasures.  It's so nice to have fresh onions.  Use them wherever you need onions, and don't forget about the tops.  You can chop the tops as far up each onion as you want to.  The flavor will be zestiest at bottom and mellows as you go up.  
Watercress - (Localvore members) Eaten cooked or raw, watercress has a slight peppery flavor. Try it in a classic British sandwich: butter and cream cheese spread on two slices of bread with watercress in between. Liven this simple sandwich up with thinly sliced radishes or cucumbers. This is another in the superfood group. Watercress is a very powerful antioxidant. A two year study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2007 determined that eating watercress daily can significantly reduce DNA damage to blood cells, which is considered to be an important trigger in the development of cancer. It is brimming with more than 15 essential vitamins and minerals. Gram for gram, it contains more iron than spinach, more vitamin C than oranges and more calcium than milk.
Beets and Beet Greens - (Localvore & Veggie Only members) Beets again this week and they are sizing up nicely.  Localvore members will get candy striped Italian Chioggia beets.  Veggie only members will receive white beets.  Both are delicious and particularly good for roasting (but good for all other uses too).  Right now while we are in full on gorgeous salad season I have been using up all my beets raw.  I have been grating them and placng them in a tupperware early in the week and then sprinkling them into salads all week.   Beet greens I have been tossing into any dishes I am cooking or more often than not, tossing them in my yogurt, banana, carrot, beet greens/chard smoothies. Yum.  Do separate beet greens from the beets and store each separately, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag.  
Kohlrabi - (Veggie Only members) - The name means cabbage turnip in German and that is a pretty accurate description. It is a member of the cabbage family and its outer skin would attest to that. The greens look more like turnip greens however and the inner bulb can be a bit fibrous, like turnip. Raw, it is crisp, sweet, and clean, strikingly reminiscent of raw broccoli stalks. Cooked, it touts a mild, nutty, cabbage-like flavor that adapts beautifully to many cooking styles. It can be eaten raw and is great in salads and slaws. It can also be boiled, steamed, baked, roasted, etc. The greens may be eaten cooked like turnip greens or any other cooked greens. To prepare the bulb, cut off the leaves and stems. Use a vegetable peeler to pare off the tough outer layer. Or use a chefs knife to slice it off. Dice or shave up the inner bulb according to your recipe. Store loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge, separate from the greens.
Strawberries - (Veggie Only members) - Veggie only members will get a first taste of this year's strawberries.  Wish we had enough for all members this week, but the strawberries are just startting. Hopefully more to come for those of you who will be with us in coming weeks.
A note about our Potatoes - It's the end of the storage season for crops that were harvested in the Fall of 2011.  At this time of year we are culling a higher percentage of each crop as we pull it from storage, wash it, and sort for you.  Our potatoes seem to have experienced some cold in our new cooler that we built last Fall, and in particular, the Nicola's (the yellow potatoes) suffered.  We work hard to sort the potatoes each week and hope we are doing a good job for you all.  I had an email from a member last week whose potatoes weren't good when she cut into them.  If you experience this, please do let me know.  
Kale This week's kale is Red Russian
Please share your comments about the veggie info you DON'T find, but wish was there!
Changes to Your Delivery?
If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let us know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or you can skip your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.
Localvore Lore
It's a pizza week this week!  Deb made the dough today and it will come to you frozen.  DThe dough is made with Aurora Farm's organic unbleached VT white flour, Gleason Grains Snake Mountain Sifted whole wheat flour, local Sunflower Oil, Maine sea salt and yeast.  Use within four to five hours of thawing (ready to go the night you pick up share or store in freezer for later use). Coat a smooth surface with flour and cornmeal (just flour ok) so that the dough does not stick to the surface. Form dough into ball and flatten with heels of palms. Stretch dough with hands or use a rolling pin to form shape of baking pan (I use a cookie sheet so I form it into a square). Once dough is slightly stretched on surface you can stretch dough in the air with hands by making two fists held together with dough on top. Move each hand up, down and out turning the dough clockwise. Give it some practice and you will be throwing doughs like the professionals. Each dough can be stretched to a 16" round, for thicker crust make smaller. If you like light fluffy crust I put my baking sheet on the top of my oven while preheating and let rise. Otherwise set aside in neutral area till oven is ready at 425 - 450F. Cook 12-14 minutes until crust is golden brown and cheese bubbles.
Once again this week we have Amir Hebib's shiitake and/or oyster mushrooms  It will be a smaller amount this time.  

Amir called Monday to let me know harvest was smaller due to the heat.  But it will be plenty to flavor a meal with the good earthy mushroomy goodness. You can eat the whole mushroom stems and all. Shiitakes have a deep flavor, and are very hearty, enough so that they can be used in place of ground beef in some recipes while oyster mushrooms have a more delicate flavor with a hint of anise and are often used to flavor soups and stir fry dishes.
You will also receive a small log of Vermont Butter and Cheese chevre that you can crumble onto your pizza or onto your salads this week.  
And lastly you will also receive a dozen of Deb's eggs.  Enjoy!
Recipes
Kale Chips
If you haven't made them yet, do try.  They are delicious, fun, super easy to make,.  They come out crispy with a very satisfying potato chip like crunch.  You can try different topping to blend in...  chili powder, parmesan cheese etc, to flavor them further, but the simple oil and salt I have given below really is great.

1 large bunch kale, tough stems removed, leaves torn into pieces (about 16 cups; see Note)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt

Position racks in upper third and center of oven; preheat to 400°F.

If kale is wet, very thoroughly pat dry with a clean kitchen towel; transfer to a large bowl. Drizzle the kale with oil and sprinkle with salt. Using your hands, massage the oil and salt onto the kale leaves to evenly coat. Fill 2 large rimmed baking sheets with a layer of kale, making sure the leaves don't overlap. (If the kale won't all fit, make the chips in batches.)

Bake until most leaves are crisp, switching the pans back to front and top to bottom halfway through, 8 to 12 minutes total. (If baking a batch on just one sheet, start checking after 8 minutes to prevent burning.)


Simplest Zucchini saute
Zucchini, I simply love it, yet it is the butt of so many jokes simply because it is so proliferous!  I just had my first zucchini of the season tonight and it didn't even make it to the dinner table.  It was gone, snacked upon before dinner was ready.
1 zucchini
butter
olive oil
Turned on a burner to warm a saute pan, cast iron great.  Slice zucchini into rounds.  Add olive oil and a 1/2 TB of butter to the pan, and coat.  Add the zucchini rounds in one layer.When they are beginning to brown on side A, flip them and allow side B to brown a bit.  Then remove from pan and put on a plate.  Salt if you wish but no need.  They are nutty, tender and delish!

Roasted Beet & Watercress Salad

3 large beets - any color, Chioggia is gorgeous
I bunch of watercress
2-ounces of goat cheese that can crumble or feta
1/2 cup raw walnuts
1/2 cup good olive oil
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp honey
1 tsp dijon mustard
sea salt & pepper to taste

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F
Roughly oil the skins of the beets with vegetable oil and place the beets on a baking sheet covered with foil for about an hour or until a knife easily slips into the beet.

Remove from the oven and allow them to cool completely.

When you are ready to assemble the salad:
Take the beets and slip off their skins – they should come off really easily. Slice the beets into 1/4″ slices.
Arrange a bed of watercress on a pretty plate and lay the beet slices overlapping each other on top.
Crumble the cheese and sprinkle the walnuts over the salad. Drizzle dressing on top.


Kohlrabi Salad

1 kohlrabi
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon wasabi mustard
Salt
1 tablespoon of rice vinegar

Dandelion or mesclun leaves for garnish (Wegmans)
1/4 cup pine nuts


Add first 6 of the ingredients to a small bowl and use a whisk or fork to mix well.
Slice the kohlrabi very thinly. Add the vinaigrette and leave to marinate as long as you can before serving (but it's still good fresh!).
In a small pan, toast the pine nuts, being careful not to burn
Garnish with mesclun or dandelion leaves sliced thin. Savor!


Mushroom Soba Noodle Soup
(makes 2 servings)

6 oz. dried soba noodles

about 3 oz. fresh sliced shiitake or oyster mushrooms

2 thin slices fresh ginger, cut to matchsticks
1 tablespoon sesame oil

1-inch piece kombu (dried seaweed)

1 egg (optional)

1 scallion, chopped

1-2 teaspoons miso paste or soy sauce
Place the kombu in a pot of about 4 cups cold water. If adding an egg, place it in the cold water, and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes or until egg is hard-boiled. Remove egg from water and set aside.

In another medium-sized pot, heat the sesame oil and ginger and add all the fresh mushrooms. Cook, stirring, until mushrooms begin to release juices, about 2-3 minutes. Add the hot kombu water. Bring to a boil. Add the soba noodles once it’s at a roiling boil. Cook until noodles are tender (according to directions on package, usually about 5 minutes). Remove from heat.

Place a ladle of the cooking water in a small bowl and stir in the miso paste until completely dissolved. Add this to the noodle soup. (If just using soy sauce, add right into the noodle soup to taste.) Divide noodles and soup into two bowls. Peel the egg and slice in half. Top each bowl with the scallions and an egg half and serve.