Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - September 29, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:

Mixed Potatoes; Onions; Celery; Napa Cabbage or Savoy Cabbage; Rhubarb; 2 Bulbs of Fennel; 1 Bunch of Mizuna; 1 Bunch of Radishes; 1 Bunch of Cilantro

 plus....

2 Winter Squash (either Sweet Dumpling and Delicata or just Sweet Dumpling)
Tomatoes (some sites may miss tomatoes this week and get them next week instead)


Localvore Offerings Include:

Red Hen Heirloom Maize Bread

Pete's Greens Dill Pickles

Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs

Butterworks Farm Buttermilk

Champlain Orchards Cortland Apples


Roots Harvest

This time of year is both grueling and incredibly rewarding. Pete and the crew have been straight out in past weeks harvesting first the onions and now the potatoes. Everyone at the farm is working long hours, and those hours are spent moving heavy crates full of freshly harvested storage crops from the fields to various storage environments. The days are long, but the crops are just beautiful this year and the harvests are large. The excitement is pervasive.

Last year Pete designed a potato and onion harvester with the help of a small farm implement company. The old harvester dug the vegetables, sifted the dirt and left the potatoes or onions on the ground. Then our crew would go out and spend the days walking the rows, bending over to collect the harvest. The new harvester is very cool. Pulled by a tractor that slowly travels each row, the new harvester digs the potatoes or onions, conveyors them up to hip level for our crew who are standing on platforms built onto the side of the harvester. Our crew picks the potatoes from the moving conveyor in front of them and sorts them by size into storage crates. No more bending!

Though the days are still just as long, this one piece of equipment is a vast improvement for our crew, and saves much hard labor. Potato harvest is now nearly finished, with carrots, turnips, beets, parsnips, cabbage left to go. ~Amy











Our roots harvester. The first two pictures were taken last year before the people platforms were added on either side. The third photo was taken by Sean Garvey this week as the potatoes were being harvested. Sean has also posted a video of the harvester in action. Check out the video!



Fall Share begins Oct 20, mail your sign-ups!


There are only two more weeks to the Summer share after this one! And that means that you have only two weeks to mail in your
application without interruption to your weekly deliveries.

NEW - Localvore Products Only Share We continue to respond to customer feedback and have decided to add a fourth share type to the Fall/Winter Share. For the first time, we are now offering a Localvore Products Only Share. The requests for this option are coming mainly from customers who wish to split a Veggie Only share with someone, but don't want to split the vegetable portion. We have also heard from folks who have had bountiful garden harvests who would like this option. I have not had time to update the website to describe this share type there, but will update that page and our sign up form as quickly as possible.

Sign up for the Good Eats Fall/Winter Share to ensure your continued weekly deliveries.

Meat Shares available too!

Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form. If you have questions about the Fall Share, please email Amy.

Sean's Adventures


Sean is three months into his four month internship at the farm. He has become our farm stan
d manager and is doing a fabulous job stocking it with the freshest produce, and keeping the meat freezer and cheese cooler full of a great assortment of local products. It really looks beautiful in there. The farm stand won't be open too much longer, probably just til the first week or weeks of October. If you haven't been out, it is a lovely drive and there's some great shopping to be had.

Along with sharing field stories from the past week, this week Sean has compiled a number of quotes he has gathered during his internship. One of them is actually mine from yesterday after I asked Sean to go out and weigh a representative sample of members of our turkey herd, so I
could judge how large they were and when they needed to be "harvested". Having raised animals all my life, to me this seemed like a normal directive. Funny to read what it is like to be on the receiving end of a request like this if you are new to this farm life stuff. Check out Sean's blog.










Storage and Use Tips

Sweet Dumpling Winter Squash
- More Sweet Dumplings this week for your eating pleasure. Have you ever tasted such sweet squash? Unfortunately though, we notice that these little beauties are quickly developing spots on their skins. These spots turn soft and when they do, the inside of the squash will begin to be affected. Enjoy them while they last and don't leave them on your counter too long!


Delicata Squash - Some of you may find little Zeppelin shaped striped squash called Delicatas at your site. These are also renowned for their sweetness. Try a little taste test of both kinds of squash!

Tomatoes - Despite what the photo above would suggest, the tomato harvest gets smaller each week. Sadly tomato season will not last forever. We will have a mix going out to sites this week. Some sites will receive cherry tomatoes, some will receive heirlooms or beefsteaks or whatever tomatoes are havested. We won't have enough tomatoes for all sites, but will stretch them as far as we can. Sites that don't receive them this week will receive them next week.

Mizuna - Also know as spider mustard, mizuna is a Japanese mustard green with tender leaves and a pleasant, peppery flavor. You could substitute it, chopped, in a salad calling for arugula. It adds a nice zest to a stir-fry or saute. Store mizuna, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

Thinking about splitting your share?

If you would like to sign up again but feel it may be too much food for you, consider splitting your share with someone. There are already a couple people in Shelburne and Montpelier looking for share partners for the Fall Share listed on our Members Seeking page. And I have just been corresponding with two others today who wish to share on Grove St and on Ward St in Burlington.

If you would are interested in sharing with someone, send me an email. I might be able to connect you to someone quickly, or I'll post something on the members seeking page for you.

Order Pete's Pastured Meats - Fill Your Freezer

We are finally able to make a wide variety of our pastured meats available to share members. We have a variety of pork and beef cuts available now. Some we have lots of, some not a lot, so for best variety order soon. Presently you can choose from pork chops, hams and ham steaks, ribs, sausage, ground pork, plus an assortment of beef steaks, ribs, roasts, kabob meat, stew meat, and burger. And of course Pete's Pastured Chicken.
Our pigs are raised on 20 acres of pasture on the farm. They graze and forage all day and their diet is supplemented by huge amounts of vegetables from the farm. Our cows are raised in partnership with friend and neighbor Bruce Urie who pastures them on his fields in Summer, and feeds them his own hay supplemented with beets and soybeans in Winter. You can order Pete's Pastured Chicken as part of your bulk meat order too. Our beef and pork is tender and delicious and has far less fat, and far more omega 3s, CLAs, vita E and beta carotene than non grass fed animals. Our animals have received no hormones or medications either. This is really healthy, very tasty meat.

You may place meat orders for delivery on most weeks that are not designated Meat Shares weeks (the first Wednesday of the month). The next meat delivery day will be October 13th and then the next will be Oct 27th (skipping the first day of the new share period Oct 20). For a short time, orders over $150 in beef and pork will receive a discount of 10%.

Visit our Meat Bulk Order Page to Order.

Localvore Lore


Red Hen Bread is back this week and that means tomorrow AM I get to drive around surrounded by the aroma of the freshly baked loaves. Tomorrow's will be hard to resist.


A few weeks ago, I wrote about the incredible wheat harvest that Vermont had this year. This week, we are making another bread that is made entirely with Vermont-grown grain, including cornmeal from an heirloom variety of corn called “Wahpsie Valley” grown on Aurora Farm in Charlotte. You can find this cornmeal in stores under the Nitty Gritty Grains label. Like all of our breads, this bread uses a naturally-fermented starter. The one in the maize bread is made from a new flour that Ben Gleason of Gleason Grains is producing called Snake Mt. Sifted Bread Flour. This is a stone-ground whole wheat flour that has a small amount of the bran sifted out of it. When fermented for several hours in the starter it develops a slightly sweet and sour flavor. The rest of the flour is this year’s unbleached white from Nitty Gritty Grains/Aurora. But, of course, the dominant feature of this bread is the maize itself… enjoy! ~ Randy

Pa Pa Doodles eggs again this week. You will get eggs once more, on Oct 13th.

We haven't had Butterworks cultured buttermilk in the share for a long time but with Fall here it feels like baking weather. I though you all might enjoy some farm fresh buttermilk for pancakes and muffins and whatnot. Despite what the name might suggest, buttermilk is actually a low fat product. Traditionally, homemade buttermilk was the slightly sour liquid that remained after butter was churned and separated from milk. At Butterworks Farm, Jack and Annie make their buttermilk from the low fat or non fat milk from their jersey cows. They add lactic acid bacteria which thickens the milk and gives it a flavor reminiscent of yogurt. In baked goods, Buttermilk promotes browning, is great for leavening, and improves texture.


To go along with the baking theme this week, we have Cortland apples from Champlain Orchards. You should have some fun deciding what to make with eggs, apples, buttermilk, rhubarb, and the flours and oats you have in your pantries. I like the concept of an apple, rhubarb crisp with oat crumble topping.... Other ideas below.


And finally, you all will receive the first pickles out of this year's barrels. These are dills from the farm. I hope you enjoy their tasty, salty, sour crunch. Send feedback!


Recipes
Mizuna Salad with Dried Cranberries and Roasted Winter Squash
One from the recipe archives



3 TB cranapple or apple cider

1.5 TB apple cider vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

1 small shallot, minced

3.5 TB sunflower or extra-virgin olive oil

1 TB butter, divided

1 unpeeled medium delicata squash or 2 sweet dumplings, halved, seeded, cut into 12 wedges
1 bunch mizuna greens, chopped (about 6 cups)

1/4 cup dried cranberries



Whisk cider and vinegar in bowl. Add minced shallot, salt and pepper. Gradually whisk in oil. Rewhisk before using.

Preheat oven to 450°F.

Melt 2 teaspoons butter in heavy large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1/2 of squash wedges. Cook until browned on both sides, about 5 minutes total. Transfer squash wedges to rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining butter and squash wedges. Sprinkle squash with salt and pepper. Bake for 20 minutes.


In a large bowl, toss mizuna with half of dressing. Divide among plates; top with squash. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with dried cranberries.


Fennel Baked with Parmesan Cheese
A recipe from: Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book. Jane Grigson's note about this recipe: "My favourite fennel dish, the best one of all by far. The simple additions of butter and parmesan - no other cheese will do - show off the fennel flavour perfectly. The point to watch, when the dish is in the oven, is the browning of the cheese. Do not let it go beyond a rich golden-brown."



2 heads fennel, trimmed, quartered


butter

pepper


1 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

Cook the fennel in salted water until it is tender. It is important to get this right: the fennel should not still be crisp, on the other hand it should not be floppy either. Drain it well and arrange in a generously buttered gratin dish. Be generous, too, with the pepper mill. Sprinkle on the cheese. Put into the oven at 400 degrees, until the cheese is golden brown and the fennel is bubbling vigorously in buttery juices.

Napa Cabbage Salad


I have twice given the recipe for a napa dressing with flavors similar to this except that the other called for mayo. The dressing below skips the mayo but is very close in flavor resulting in the same "can't get enough" from any who try it. This rendition comes from the weblog Diet, Dessert, and Dogs. The author's comments echo my own "The two essential components, I’ve found, are the napa (or savoy) cabbage and the dressing; pretty much everything else can be adjusted or substituted."


1 whole napa cabbage, washed, trimmed, and sliced thinly
(or 1 savoy)
Several radishes or salad turnips sliced thin or grated (raw beets are nice too)

1 carrot, grated, if desired

1/4-1/3 cup toasted pine nuts, or almonds, or any nut you choose really

1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds (optional, but nice)


Dressing:

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup sugar or a bit less honey

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp. tamari or soy sauce

1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil

1 very small onion, grated on the finest holes of your grater (it should almost liquefy)

1 clove garlic, crushed


Toss the salad ingredients in a bowl. In a smaller bowl, combine the dressing ingredients and whisk to mix well. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Makes about 6 servings.


Warm Potato Salad with Cilantro & Toasted Cumin


Serves 4 to 6


2 tablespoons kosher salt

2 pounds potatoes, chopped into roughly
2-inch pieces

1 bunch cilantro, stems trimmed and removed

3 large shallots

1/4 cup olive oil

1 1/2 tablespoons whole cumin

1/2 lemon

Freshly ground black pepper


Bring a large pot of water to boil over high heat. Stir in 2 tablespoons of kosher salt. Add the diced potatoes and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, or until they are tender but not yet mush. Drain and return to the pot.


Chop the cilantro roughly and stir it into the hot potatoes. Slice the shallots thinly and stir them in too. Pour the olive oil oil into a small skillet and heat over medium-high heat. When the oil is quite hot, stir in the 1 1/2 tablespoons of whole cumin seeds. Cook for about 45 seconds, stirring frequently, until the cumin and oil smell toasty and the cumin has darkened slightly. Pour the contents of the skillet over the potatoes (watch out, as some of the seeds may pop as they hit the cooler pan). Stir thoroughly. Juice the 1/2 lemon and stir the juice in as well. Season to taste with black pepper, and any additional salt, if needed. Serve warm, room temperature, or cold.

Classic Buttermilk Pancakes

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 cup well-shaken buttermilk

Vegetable oil for brushing griddle



Whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, egg, and buttermilk until smooth.
Heat a griddle or a large heavy skillet over moderate heat until hot enough to make drops of water scatter over its surface, then brush with oil. Pour about 1/8 cup batter per pancake onto griddle and cook, turning over once, until golden, about 2 minutes per batch.


Warm Apple-Buttermilk Custard Pie


From Cooking Light in 2003. The key to both a flaky piecrust and crisp streusel topping is to keep them as cold as possible before putting them into the oven. Yield: 10 servings


Your favorite pie crust


Streusel:

1/3 cup all purpose flour

1/3 cup packed maple sugar or other granulated sugar

½ tsp ground cinnamon

2 ½ tsp chilled butter, cut into small pieces



Filling:
5 cups sliced peeled apple (about 2 pounds)

1/2 cup honey

¼ cup sugar

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 TB flour

¼ tsp salt

3 eggs

1 3/4 cups buttermilk

1 tsp vanilla extract


Preheat oven to 325º.


Ready a pie plate with your favorite pie crust, and place in fridge.


To prepare streusel, combine 1/3 cup flour, sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon in a medium bowl; cut in butter with a pastry blender or 2 knives until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Place streusel in refrigerator.

To prepare the filling, heat a large skillet and coat pan surface with butter or oil. Add sliced apple, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon; cook 10 minutes or until the apple is tender, stirring mixture occasionally. Spoon the apple mixture into prepared crust.

Combine remaining ½ cup honey, 2 tablespoons flour, salt, and eggs, stirring with a whisk. Stir in buttermilk and vanilla. Pour over apple mixture.


Bake at 325º for 30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300º (do not remove pie from oven); sprinkle streusel over pie. Bake at 300º for 40 minutes or until set. Let stand 1 hour before serving.


Cinnamon-Topped Rhubarb Muffins
A well reviewed recipe from Allrecipes.com. Makes 24 muffins


2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 egg, lightly beaten

1 cup buttermilk

2/3 cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups finely chopped rhubarb


TOPPING:
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon


In a large bowl, combine the first five ingredients. Combine egg, buttermilk, oil and vanilla; stir into dry ingredients just until moistened. Fold in rhubarb. Fill greased or paper-lined muffins cups about half full. Combine topping ingredients; sprinkle over each muffin. Bake at 375 degrees F for 16-18 minutes or until muffins test done.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - September 22, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:

Mixed Potatoes; 1 Bunch of Orange Carrots; 1 Bunch of Sweet Salad Turnips; 2 Sweet Dumpling Winter Squash; 2 Torpedo Onions; 2 Shallots; 1 Head of Garlic; Sweet Pepper; Broccoli; 1 Cayenne Pepper, plus...



1 Bag Arugula


Localvore Offerings Include:

Elmore Mountain Bread

Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs

Willow Hill Cheese

Pete's Musings
We received a nice grant from USDA NRCS to put in an irrigation system a couple years ago. Never got around to it and now the grant is due Oct. 1. So we are scrambling to order pipe, a traveler (big sprinkler that moves as it sprays), a pump and lots of parts and pieces. It is going to be great to have an easy way to apply water all over our fields, it will really take some stress away.


Potato harvest slowly proceeds. Some days too wet, most days too busy doing everything else. We need to really make it happen the next four days. Wish us luck and no broken equipment.

We have a bed of celery that is growing in one of our winter greenhouses. Have never tried it in the fall before and it is looking really nice. I hear it is much hardier than people think and I hope we can keep it going well into November or later.


I'm heading to Europe next week. Tour of vegetable field trials, farms, and a CSA in Holland and Denmark followed by a few days visiting cheese facilities in France and Switzerland. Looking forward to having my mind blown by all the cool stuff those organized and specialized Europeans have figured out. ~Pete

Sean's Adventures
Sean Garvey has been blogging about his adventures as an intern on the farm this Summer. Sean is invigorated by his work and is excited to share the farm with anyone who is interested. This week he invited any of you who would like to experience life on the farm to come out and spend an afternoon working alongside him. He claims he'll even cook you dinner in exchange for some good IPA. Check out Sean's blog.






Storage and Use Tips

Sweet Dumpling Winter Squash - Wow are these good. Yesterday we tested several squash varieties at the farm to see if they were ready. We baked them and tried all of the varieties and these are just amazing. We ate them plain, right out of the shell for lunch, they are that good, so sweet.

Sweet Salad Turnips - Tender, fresh dug Sweet Salad Turnips can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw they have a texture similar to a radish, but are not so sharp. Or slice, dice, or quarter them and saute with butter or oil. Cook until just tender and still a little crisp. Just a little salt or maybe a little bit of vinegar is all they need. Cooked with butter and given a slight drizzle of honey and even picky little eaters may gobble them up. Don't forget the greens! Turnip greens are tender and flavorful. Chop and saute with the turnips for a side dish, or cook up with other greens, or by themselves. They make a great addition to pasta sauces too.

Fall/Winter Share is Now 4 Weeks Away

There are only 3 more deliveries after this week.

Sign up for the Good Eats Fall/Winter Share to ensure your continued weekly deliveries. The Fall share begins on Oct 20th and continues through Feb 16th.

We continue in our quest to provide the greatest diversity of produce for as much of the year as possible. A great growing season has produced a bounty of storage crops and our greenhouses will be stocked with baby greens, pac choi, napa, celery, fennel, head lettuce and others that we'll harvest into December. In the depths of winter we'll blend the hardiest winter greens from the greenhouses with sunflower, radish and pea shoots grown indoors so that our members receive something fresh and green nearly every week. These green offerings combined with our storage crops (potatoes, carrots, onions, winter squash, turnips, kohlrabi, cabbages, and many more) and frozen summer crops will keep us eating a diverse, healthy, local diet all winter long.

Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form.

If you have questions about the Fall Share, please email Amy.




















Looking for Someone to Split a
Share with?
If you would like to sign up again but feel it may be too much food for you, consider splitting your share with someone. There are already a couple people in Shelburne and Montpelier looking for share partners for the Fall Share listed on our Members Seeking page. If you would like to be added to the list here, send me an email and I'll post a notice there for you.

Order Pete's Pastured Meats - Fill Your Freezer
We are finally able to make a wide variety of our pastured meats available to share members. We have a variety of pork and beef cuts available now. Some we have lots of, some not a lot, so for best variety order soon. Presently you can choose from pork chops, hams and ham steaks, ribs, sausage, ground pork, plus an assortment of beef steaks, ribs, roasts, kabob meat, stew meat, and burger. And of course Pete's Pastured Chicken.

Our pigs are raised on 20 acres of pasture on the farm. They graze and forage all day and their diet is supplemented by huge amounts of vegetables from the farm. Our cows are raised in partnership with friend and neighbor Bruce Urie who pastures them on his fields in Summer, and feeds them his own hay supplemented with beets and soybeans in Winter. Our beef and pork is tender and delicious and has far less fat, and far more omega 3s, CLAs, vita E and beta carotene than non grass fed animals. Our animals have received no hormones or medications either. This is really healthy, very tasty meat.

You may place meat orders for delivery on most weeks that are not designated Meat Shares weeks (the first Wednesday of the month). The first delivery day is next week, Sep 29. After that, we skip Oct 6 (Meat Share week) and then will deliver meats again October 13th. If I receive your order by Wednesday this week, I can get your order out to you next week.

For a short time, orders over $150 in beef and pork and receive a discount of 10%.

Visit our Meat Bulk Order Page to Order.






















Pete's Pastured Chicken

All chicken is not created equal. Most chickens live in terribly cramped, foul smelling barns, breathing ammonia fumes most of their lives. "Free range" chickens usually fare better but the only requirement for free range birds is that they have the OPPORTUNITY to go outside. Meaning the barn they live in needs to have a door that connects the birds to the outside. Because all their feed and water is inside the barn, the birds often do not take advantage. And most free range producers do not have lush fields on the other side of that chicken door, often just an overused dirt yard.

At Pete's Greens our chickens lead a pretty charmed life. They begin their days in the greenhouse, and then move outside as soon as they are feathered out. They spend their whole lives eating greens from the farm, and get plenty of fresh air and sunshine.

Our chickens are an important part of the fertility plan on the farm. They are moved from place to place, cleaning up fields and greenhouses before the old crops are tilled under. They provide a valuable service, making use of the greens as feed, and leaving behind nitrogen to replace that which the arugula drew from the soil. This is good for the fields, it's a great, fresh environment for the birds, and it's also great news for those of us who dine on them. The meat from our birds are packed with far more vitamins than non pastured birds.

You can order chickens and have them delivered directly to your pick up site any week (except meat share weeks). Minimum order is 3 chickens, but if you order 5 or more you can take advantage of our special price of $3.50/lb (regular price is $3.75/lb).

For more info about our chickens, and to order, please visit the chicken page. You can also add add chickens to a Meat Bulk Order along with Pork and Beef.

Localvore Lore
Elmore Mountain bread is back this week. Blair just emailed to let me know that she and Andrew are baking Quebec Multi-Grain. This bread features Whole Wheat & Winter Wheat from Meunerie Milanise in Quebec, cracked grains from Michel Gaudreau Golden Crops in Quebec, sea salt, and sourdough. I don't think I have mentioned my little kitchen experiment... Last March my family and I went to FL, and of course while on vacation you end up buying items you normally wouldn't buy. I bought a bag of Thomas whole wheat bagels. We ate several in FL and then they made the journey home in the food tote in the minivan. There were three left. No longer interested in this type of food once back in the land of plenty, the bagels sat in the bread basket. Weeks passed and they were still "fresh". They had not molded, they were still soft. I decided to leave them there to see what would happen. It has now been nearly 6 months since I purchased them, and while now slightly more firm than when first purchased, the bagels are still "fine". One can only imagine the variety of preservatives, conditioners, and who knows what that have been added to these bagels to keep them from resisting natural breakdown. I am thankful for the pure wholesome breads we have available to us, made even better with the knowledge that we also support local farms, bakers, and our own local economy when we buy them.

Pa Pa Doodles eggs are back this week and next week. With the salmonella scare, it sure is nice to have a solid source of good local eggs. Just as I did when I was a kid, my kids eat eggnog each morning made from Deb's eggs, milk, vanilla, and a bit of sugar. It's a great first nutritional boost for them in the AM as each kid takes in 1 egg and a cup of milk. They love them, and so do I, for the ease of them, and the good fresh source.

This is only the second time we have had the opportunity to include one of Willow Hill Farm's award winning cheeses. Willow Smart and husband Dave Phinney raise sheep and cows on their diversified organic farm in Milton. They make their cheeses from milk from their own animals and age their cheeses in their own cave. I wanted to include one of the sheep cheeses they make only in summer, but this has proved challenging because it's hard for them to make enough extra of one particular cheese.

Instead we have two different cheeses for you to choose between. Summertomme is a semi-firm cheese with a rind that is lined with herb. The rind is entirely edible of course, and the the strong flavor of the rind compliments the strong, buttery textured cheese within. The flavors are fresh and floral with a rich, earthy tang and a slightly sweet finish. This cheese has won numerous awards including a silver medal at the World Cheese Awards in 2006. The Vermont Brebis has a soft rind and a mushroom-like, earthy taste that contains hints of herbs. The word "brebis" is pronounced like "bray-bee" and is a French word that means "ewe." Vermont Brebis has received honors from the American Cheese Society in 2003, 2004, and 2005. It was awarded a bronze medal at the World Cheese Awards in 2004, and a silver in 2006. You will have to choose one of these cheeses at your site, but you can't go wrong with either!

Recipes

Simple Baked Sweet Dumpling Squash

Honestly, this squash needs no treatment at all save for a bit of butter perhaps, or salt & pepper. But if you have anyone in your household that you need to convince that winter squash is delicious, try this. Each half serves 1 person.

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

Cut the squash in half, and remove the seeds and extra bits with a spoon. Turn upside down, and poke some holes in the skin with a fork. Turn it back over, and place each half into a baking dish filled with an inch or so of water. In each squash half, put the following ingredients, sprinkling spices on the top edge, too:

1 tablespoon pure maple syrup

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 tablespoon butter

1 teaspoon brown sugar


Bake uncovered on the middle oven rack for 40-45 minutes, or until tender.

Roasted Potato Salad with Wilted Arugula Two Ways

Two delicious salads to choose from - or make them both on different days. Serves 4.

1.5 lb potatoes
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Arugula - 1 to 2 cups or more as you prefer

Heat oven to 400*. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut potatoes into 1-2 inch chunks and transfer to baking sheet. Coat the potatoes evenly with olive oil, salt and pepper. Bake for 30-40 minutes, until golden, crispy and fork tender.

Transfer hot potatoes to a large serving bowl, toss with a couple large handfuls or arugula and add either:


Parmesan Olive Combo

1/3 cup parm, grated

1/3 cup olives (spanish pr kalamata)

1 TB capers

2-3 TB chopped torpedo onion

salt & pepper to taste



Lemony Dressing

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoon sherry vinegar


Young Turnip and Apricot Salad with Toasted Nuts

Here's one from the recipe archives. Adapted from Farmer John's Cookbook. Serves 4.



1/2 cup walnut pieces

1 bunch salad turnips, greens washed, spun dry and set aside

1/2 cup finely sliced dried apricots

1/4 cup finely chopped parsley or cilantro

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/4 cup plain yogurt

1/4 cup minced sweet onion

1 small hot pepper, minced, or to taste

1 clove garlic

1 tsp dry mustard

scant tbsp grated horseradish

1 tsp tamari

salt

pepper

salad greens (mesclun or arugula would work fine here)



Toast walnuts in a dry heavy skillet stirring constantly until lightly browned and fragrant. Transfer to a dishtowel to cool.

Wash turnips and cut into thin matchsticks. Combine with apricots and walnuts in a large bowl.



Coarsely chop turnip greens. Put the parsley, chopped turnip greens, oils, vinegar and yogurt into a blender; process briefly, until the ingredients are just combined. Add the onion, hot pepper, garlic, mustard, horseradish, and soy sauce; process until thick and creamy.

Pour the dressing over the turnip mixture; toss until well combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 Line individual plates with a generous amount of salad greens; spoon the turnip salad on top. Serve immediately.


Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - September 15, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
Orange Carrots; 1 Bunch of Chiogga Beets, tops on; Yellow Onions; Cippolini Onions; Savoy Cabbage; 1 Bunch of Kale; Sweet Pepper; plus...



1 Bag Mesclun Greens
10 Ears Sweet Corn
Tomatoes






Localvore Offerings Include:

Butterworks Whole Wheat Pastry Flour

Champlain Orchards Macintosh Apples

Les Aliments Massawippi Miso


Pete's Musings
Sign up now for the Oct - Feb share period! We are more prepared than ever for this share with a full freezer, excellent storage crop production, and great Fall and Winter greens coming along in the greenhouses. Today we'll freeze another 1000 lbs. of red peppers, next week we'll begin to puree winter squash, another batch of chickens will go in the freezer tomorrow - the bounty of Fall never ends.

Fall harvest is in full swing. We tackled potatoes on Sunday, a big job that I had been dreading a little because the field they are in this year has little clumps of sod in it (and stones) that prevent the potato digger from working at its full potential. It is a huge and excellent crop and we've worked out a system for harvesting them that, while not pretty, will get the job done.


The crew is doing great. I knew things were going well yesterday when I got to the potato digger a couple minutes early and then watched a group of 4 guys sprint 100 yards across the field racing and wrestling with each other as they ran to see who could get to the digger first. They seem to like working on the digger. I drive the tractor and it is a boring and tedious job but always gratifying to see the potatoes emerge from the earth.


The crew has been playing basketball a few evenings a week. Gringos against amigos, we gringos have lost every game but one even though we have a significant height advantage over our friends from south of the border. The amigos are quick, play with great teamwork, are excellent passers, and don't miss many shots. They are very fun to watch and maddening to play against. We haven't thrown in the towel and have been working on some new defensive strategies that we think might shut them down. ~Pete

Storage and Use Tips
Cippolini Onions - Pronounced chip-oh-LEE-nee. These are the short, disk-shaped yellow onions in your bag. Originating in Italy, cippolinis are very sweet and delicious. Try roasting some whole. Peel them, toss with a liberal amount olive oil, a few sprigs of thyme, salt and pepper, and roast in a 375F oven for around 30 minutes, or so. Serve as a side dish. Store in a cool dark place.

Chioggia Beets - An Italian variety, chioggias have alternating white and pink rings of color on the inside. The outside is lighter and more pinkish than traditional red beets. With a sweet peppery flavor, they are smooth and mild tasting. To prevent chioggias from bleeding their color, roast them whole then slice crosswise to show off the beautiful rings. Roasted this way, they make a stunning addition to a salad made with the baby greens and shoots mix. Yoiu can also slice them thin and add them to salads raw. I keep a bag of them pre-sliced in the fridge and toss them in to salads daily. Even pre-sliced they keep very well in the fridge for a week or more. Do roast and store cooked chioggia beets separately from your red beets to prevent the chioggias from being dyed red. Store raw beets loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

Sweet Corn - Today's sweet corn is small in size and they may have some earworms! Earworms won't hurt you and are the result of growing corn without any pesticides, organic or otherwise. Back in the day, all corn came with the possibility of earworms or earworm damage. With the development of pesticides, we aren't used to seeing these pesky creatures anymore, but with organic corn, there is always that risk. Cut the kernels off in damaged areas and enjoy good corn while it lasts.

Savoy Cabbage - Round with crinkled leaves, Savoys are the beauties of the cabbage world. Their leaves are more delicate and more loosely packed than their green cabbage cousins. Store as you would other cabbages, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer. Don't worry if the outer leaves begin to discolor or tear on you, just remove them to expose the perfectly good leaves remaining below.




Fall/Winter Share Begins in Just 5 Weeks on October 20th
Vegetable Only, Localvore, and Meat Shares Available

NEWSFLASH!~ We have decided to offer a Vegetable Only Share this Fall along with our Localvore Share.

The Fall share is a rich share period that inspires a great season of cooking. We are still harvesting much of the vegetables from the field at the start of the share. Remnants of summer such as tomatoes and peppers may appear, but by mid-November the offerings will be distinctly fall-like. Our root cellar will be overflowing with potatoes, onions, leeks, turnips, shallots, rutabagas, carrots, beets, cabbages, kohlrabi, celeriac, and winter squash. We expect to be harvesting baby greens such as head lettuce, and other hardy greens such as chard and kale into December. With each passing year, Pete gets better and better at growing salad greens and sprouts in the cold winter months and last year we succeeded in sending out fresh green salad fixings throughout the share. We intend to provide something fresh and green nearly every week this winter to compliment our wide variety of roots and storage crops. We will also be supplementing our stored crops and fresh greens with frozen item like tomatoes, corn, spinach, braising greens, winter squash, rhubarb, peppers and more. The combination of storage crops, hardy crops, greenhouse items and frozen and preserved veggies and fruits will keep us all eating a healthy, rich local diet all winter long.

There are only 4 more deliveries after this week - DON'T DELAY.

Sign up for the Good Eats Fall/Winter Share now to ensure your continued weekly deliveries. The Fall share begins on Oct 20th and continues through Feb 16th.

Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form.

If you have questions about the Fall Share, please email Amy.

Pete's Pastured Chicken
All chicken is not created equal. Most chickens live in terribly cramped, foul smelling barns, breathing ammonia fumes most of their lives. "Free range" chickens usually fare better but the only requirement for free range birds is that they have the OPPORTUNITY to go outside. Meaning the barn they live in needs to have a door that connects the birds to the outside. Because all their feed and water is inside the barn, the birds often do not take advantage. And most free range producers do not have lush fields on the other side of that chicken door, often just an overused dirt yard.

At Pete's Greens our chickens lead a pretty charmed life. They begin their days in the greenhouse, and then move outside as soon as they are feathered out. They spend their whole lives eating greens from the farm, and get plenty of fresh air and sunshine.

Our chickens are an important part of the fertility plan on the farm. They are moved from place to place, cleaning up fields and greenhouses before the old crops are tilled under. They provide a valuable service, making use of the greens as feed, and leaving behind nitrogen to replace that which the arugula drew from the soil. This is good for the fields, it's a great, fresh environment for the birds, and it's also great news for those of us who dine on them. The meat from our birds are packed with far more vitamins than non pastured birds.

You can order chickens and have them delivered directly to your pick up site any week (except meat share weeks). Minimum order is 3 chickens, but if you order 5 or more you can take advantage of our special price of $3.50/lb (regular price is $3.75/lb).

For more info about our chickens, and to order, please visit the chicken page.

Localvore Lore
Last year, our few Vermont wheat farmers had a near total crop failure of whole wheat pastry flour. It was a wet season and the wheat just molded. This year we will have beautiful pastry flour and other flours as well to choose from. Fresh from harvest, and freshly ground for this week's share, we have Butterworks Farm organic whole wheat pastry flour. Pastry flours are made from soft wheat varieties with less gluten than hard wheat varieties. Like all whole wheat flours, the flour is ground from the entire grain - bran, endosperm and germ are all present. The germ contains oils that can go rancid, so please store this flour in a cool dry place. I often keep my whole wheat flour in my freezer if I know I won't use it up in a month or so.

And of course we couldn't send fresh flour without some inspiration for baking, so along with the flour you will be receiving fresh MacIntosh apples from Champlain Orchards. Macs are great for baking (the apples will be softer than some other baking varieties), and also great for fresh eating of course.

Gilbert and Suzanne of Les Aliments Massawippi in Quebec made the superb Japanese miso in the share today. The two are big supporters of local growers. Their oats come from Michel Gaudreau. Their soy beans come from a grower within 60 kilometers of their facility, and their Quebec barley is processed on the south shore of Montreal. The seaweed for the Japanese miso comes from southern New Brunswick and Gaspe Bay. To make this miso, Suzanne and Gilbert begin by introducing their own lactobacilli culture to washed oats. After culturing for 45 hours, they have what is called, "koji," the basis for making their miso. At this point, they will mix in soy that has been soaked and then slowly cooked for 20 hours. This part of the process takes around 4 days. The next phase of miso production is fermentation. Gilbert and Suzanne ferment their miso very carefully controlling the temperature, humidity and oxygen levels. Their fermentation chamber is on premises, and is held at a continuous 60F. The Japanese soya and oats variety in the share this week ferments for 2-3 years. As a fermented product, miso will keep in your fridge many years. There are so many delicious and interesting ways to eat miso. To make a simple cup of miso soup, mix a heaping teaspoon of miso with cold water to make a paste. Then, stir in hot (but not boiling water) to make a hot breakfast beverage, midday pick-me-up or soup base for a meal. Add a small amount of vegetables (carrots, onions, greens) to the boiling water and perhaps some noodles to for a heartier cup. As miso is a living food, try not to cook it, rather, stir it in at the end of cooking once the pan is off the heat.

Recipes


Savory Corn Cakes
Excellent with a tomatillo or pico de gallo salsa. Grate a little cheese on top while still warm, if you'd like. Serves 4.



1 TB oil

1 cup thinly sliced onions

3 cups fresh corn kernels, about 3 ears worth

1 jalapeno, minced, to taste

salt to taste
1 TB lemon juice

2 eggs

1/2 cup yogurt
1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour

1/2 cup cornmeal

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp baking powder

oil for cooking



Saute onions, corn and chilies in oil with a sprinkling of salt for about 10 minutes. Stir in lemon juice and set aside. Whisk together eggs and yogurt. Blend together dry ingredients. Add corn mixture to the eggs and then fold in the dry ingredients.

Heat a lightly oiled griddle over medium high heat. Spoon batter making 3 rounds. Cook until golden on both sides, flipping once, about 7 minutes total.

Spicy Savoy Slaw
Adapted from a 2002 Gourmet recipe.
5 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 to 2 teaspoons minced fresh serrano chile (including seeds)
1 teaspoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil
1 1/2 pounds Savoy cabbage, thinly sliced (6 cups)
1/4 pound carrots sliced very thinly sliced lengthwise, or grated (1 cup)
1/4 sweet bell pepper, cut into thin matchsticks

Whisk together vinegar, sugar, and salt in a large bowl until sugar and salt are dissolved, then whisk in chile, ginger, and sesame oil. Add remaining ingredients and toss well. Let stand, uncovered, at room temperature, tossing occasionally, until wilted, about 30 minutes.
Baked Black Beans and Corn, Enchilada Style
Here's a really quick and easy dish if you'd like to use up some of your corn. Serve this along with some fresh shredded cabbage, sour cream, hot sauce, and lime wedges. From How to Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman.


1/4 c extra virgin olive oil

2 c salsa (homemade is preferred), warmed

4 c cooked or drained canned black beans
1 cup fresh (or frozen) corn kernals
salt and ground black pepper
1 c cubed Monterey Jack cheese (or cheddar)
1 c crushed tortilla chips
1/2 c crumbled queso fresco (don't worry if you don't have this, it will be great anyway without it)

1/2 c chopped fresh cilantro for garnish (again optional)

Variation suggestion - you could add chopped beet greens to this dish. They'd bring up the nutritional value and would be tasty.



Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a tablespoon or so of the olive oil to grease a 2-quart souffle or gratin dish or a 9x13-inch baking dish.

Spread the salsa and con queso in the dish and spoon the beans on top. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Spread the cheese cubes around evenly, pressing them into the sauce and beans a bit. Sprinkle with the tortilla crumbs, then the queso fresco, and drizzle with the remaining olive oil.

Bake until the cheese has melted, the sauce is bubbly, and the tortilla chips are browned, 20 to 30 minutes, depending on the size of your dish. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the cilantro and a few more grinds of black pepper if you like, and serve.

Miso Carrot Sauce With Ginger
Here's a quick dressing to put on your mesclun greens and raw chiogga beet salad this week. From Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, this dressing is very similar to the dressing you might receive on your green salad at a nice Japanese restaurant.



¼ cup peanut or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn

¼ cup rice vinegar

3 tablespoons miso
1 tablespoon dark sesame oil

2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into big pieces

1 inch-long piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into coins

Salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Put all ingredients except salt and pepper into food processor and pulse a few times to mince carrots. Then let machine run for a minute or so until mixture is chunky-smooth.

Taste and add salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately or cover tightly and refrigerate for up to several days.

Nutty Miso Sauce

Another versatile sauce from Mark Bittman, this one goes well with many vegetables and will be delicious on top of your steamed kale or beet greens this week. Also rather good on sliced tomatoes.

One 1 inch long piece of ginger
1/4 cup miso
1 cup shelled walnuts (or any other unsalted roasted nut, or seeds, or 1/2 cup tahini, 1/2 cup water)
1 tsp tamari

Grate the ginger over a bowl, then press out the juice to obtain about 1 tsp. Combine ginger juice with remaining ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth, stopping the machine and scraping down the sides if necessary. Add a little water or tamari until mix is desired thickness. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Honey, Apple Crisp

Incredibly easy to throw together, this crisp makes a lovely weeknight treat. Serve it with a dollop of last week's yogurt or a spoonful of whipped cream. Serves 6-8.



1.5 lbs apples, peeled, cored and sliced (about 6 cups)
1/2 cup + 2TB honey, divided, or to taste

1 tsp vanilla
pinch salt

1/2 cup flour

1/2 cup rolled oats

3/4 tsp cinnamon

3/4 tsp ground nutmeg

5 TB cold, unsalted butter, cut into small pieces



Preheat the oven to 375F. Butter an 8" square pan and set aside. Combine the apples, honey, vanilla and salt. Spread into the prepared pan. Whisk together the flour, oats, cinnamon and nutmeg. Stir in the honey, and then cut in the butter until a coarse meal forms. Sprinkle over fruit topping. Bake for about 30 minutes, until the juices are bubbling, apples are tender and the top is golden brown. Serve warm.

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Good Eats Newsletter - September 8, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
2 lbs Red Norland Potatoes; 1 Bunch of Beet Greens; Red Torpedo Onions; Mixed Sweet Peppers; Jalapeno Peppers; 2 Heads of Garlic; Zucchini; Broccoli; 1 Bunch of Mizuna; plus...

1 Bag Arugula

Localvore Offerings Include:
Elmore Mountain Foagies
VT Pasta Spinach Ravioli
Maine Sea Salt

Pete's Musings
I have one guilty pleasure in life. It is buying pre Tacoma (pre 1995) Toyota pickups. I've written about this before, some of you are probably tired of hearing about it and would rather hear about the details of kohlrabi production, but sometimes you just have to write what you feel. Anyway, my life transportation plan is to accumulate 10 Toyota pickups. Each is good for 3-5 years of driving so I figure that will pretty much take care of my transportation needs until I'm old enough to become a road hazard. I like the 2wd models for general road use. Great mileage (30 mpg plus), sporty performance (I hear the snickers), and always an open bed to fill with a bike or a dog or two. You can pick these up for about 2 grand so I figure $20,000 for the purchasing, another $10,000 for parts over the next 40 years (remember I'll have plenty of parts vehicles), and I'll be mobile for the next 40 years for less than $1000 per year.

I have a partner in this plan. His name is Andrew and he is my brother. He likes to act like I'm crazy but has been assisting in the plan and now has acquired one of these trucks for himself. He has lived in Utah for several years and Utah is a great place to buy these yotas. Little salt, a great website that makes them easy to find, and a little less competition from the amigos in Mexico than places like LA and Arizona. He just moved back to Vermont and brought one of these trucks for himself and towed one for me. So now my stash is up to 3-only 7 to go though I have no idea where I will store them. I've been encouraged to take a break from the acquisitions for a few years but who knows how long these most perfectly designed of all vehicles will be available? Enjoy the share this week, it is a nice one. ~Pete

Sean's Adventures
Sean has been let out on furlough and is enjoying a few days of leisure away from the farm. Imagine my surprise when his post appeared in my email box moments ago. He is dedicated to serving you all with his weekly farm tales. Check out Sean's blog.

Fall/Winter Good Eats Sign Up
The Fall share is a rich share period that inspires a great season of cooking. We are still harvesting much of the vegetables from the field at the start of the share. Remnants of summer such as tomatoes and peppers may appear, but by mid-November the offerings will be distinctly fall-like. Our root cellar will be overflowing with potatoes, onions, leeks, turnips, shallots, rutabagas, carrots, beets, cabbages, kohlrabi, celeriac, and winter squash. We expect to be harvesting baby greens such as head lettuce, and other hardy greens such as chard and kale into December. With each passing year, Pete gets better and better at growing salad greens and sprouts in the cold winter months and last year we succeeded in sending out fresh green salad fixings throughout the share. We intend to provide something fresh and green nearly every week this winter to compliment our wide variety of roots and storage crops. We will also be supplementing our stored crops and fresh greens with frozen item like tomatoes, corn, spinach, braising greens, winter squash, rhubarb, peppers and more. The combination of storage crops, hardy crops, greenhouse items and frozen and preserved veggies and fruits will keep us all eating a healthy, rich local diet all winter long.

Sign up for the Good Eats Fall/Winter Share now to ensure continued weekly deliveries! The Fall share begins on Oct 20th and continues through Feb 16th.

Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form.












Storage and Use Tips

Red Torpedo Onions - The red torpedo onion is an heirloom onion native to Torpea in Calabria, Italy, where it has been cultivated for well over a thousand years. It has been around that long because it is touted to be the sweetest onion in the world. Delicious raw, they can be used in salads and sandwiches. Cooking these onions though brings out its divine sweetness, with roasting and carmelizing delivering a melt in your mouth delicacy. They are not terrific keepers, so they are generally around only in Fall after harvest. As always, store onions in a cool dry environment or loosely wrapped in your crisper drawer.

Sweet Peppers - we have sweet peppers again this week. Our harvest has been great this year with the intermittent rain and loads of sun. If you aren't keeping up with yours, I thought I'd offer a couple freezing suggestions. Sweet peppers freeze beautifully and are so pricey off season that it's well worth doing so. Just core and deseed them, and then slice them up into quarters or slices or toss them into a freezer bag. They'll be perfect in stir fries, casseroles, etc. Or try roasting them and then freezing them. If you can avoid eating them after roasting them.... To roast, simply core and seed, quarter them, brush them with olive oil (or not), and then roast them in the oven, skin side up at n oven temp of anywhere from 45o to broiling. The hotter the oven, the quicker they will roast. With a very hot oven, you may want to turn them a time or two for even roasting.&n bsp; Roast until the skins blister and brown or char a bit. Then remove from oven to cool. Most cooks like to remove the charred skins from the peppers before using in a dish. This is done easily if you cover the cooling peppers with a cloth for 10 minutes. The steam loosens the skin and peeling is easier. If freezing your peppers however, skins on may be better as it's said that they help prevent freezer burn. You can peel them when they thaw.

Mizuna - Also known as spider mustard, mizuna is a Japanese mustard green with tender leaves and a pleasant, peppery flavor. You could substitute it, chopped, in a salad calling for arugula. It adds a nice zest to a stir-fry or saute. Store mizuna, unwashed, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

Beet Greens - The beet greens in your share today are best eaten cooked. They are related to Swiss chard and may be used exactly the same way. I love them sautéed with a bit of oil and vinegar (balsamic or apple cider) and salt & pepper. Or with garlic, oil, a drizzle of sesame oil and tamari. You can also toss them into most recipes that call for other greens (mustard greens, spinach). They are milder in flavor than mustard greens, but a bit stronger than spinach. They are delicious.

Arugula - Also known as Rocket or Roquette, this is a very popular and versatile green, that can be eaten raw, but also stands up well in the sauté pan. It has a peppery mustardy flavor so some people prefer to tone it down by mixing it with other greens. It blends particularly well with goat cheese and balsamic and olive oil. It is delicious simply sautéed in a pan with olive oil. I toss it on sandwiches to give them pep, and into salads to take it up a notch. This is baby arugula which is the mildest of all.

Localvore Lore
Several local treats this week. First from Ted Fecteau and VT Pasta we have a brand new product that he has developed just for us. The spinach ravioli are made with our own spinach, goat feta from VT Butter and Cheese Co., organic buttermilk from Butterworks Farm, and the pasta itself is made using organic whole wheat flour from Butterworks Farm and Aurora Farms organic white flour. I can think of three sauces that would be delightful with these - a sage brown butter, a nice marinara, and a roasted red pepper sauce - re cipe included. The ravioli will go out frozen. If you are not going to cook them up tonight, just toss them back in your freezer til you will use them. To cook, boil a pot of salted water. When boiling, toss in the frozen pasta, and cook for 5 minutes or until tender.

We have sea salt from the Maine Sea Salt Company. The Cook Family isolates the salt in the same basic way people have done forever, yet it's the first salt works company to be set up in Maine in 200 years.

Our solar greenhouses, known as "salt houses" are filled with fresh seawater from the Gulf of Maine. The seawater evaporates naturally, from the heat of the sun and the drying effects of the wind blowing through the greenhouses. Over a period of time, fleur de sel floats on the pool surface, then grows and sinks to the floor to form the salt bed. When all of the water has evaporated, the sea salt is ready to be packaged as natural Maine Sea Salt™. We do not wash or bleach our salt at any time during the solar production process. Therefore, the nutritious trace minerals naturally occurring in seawater are retained in our products. We also do not use chemicals or drying agents.

And back by popular demand, Blair and Andrew baked us some more tasty Elmore Mountain Bread Foagies - their focaccia hoagies. For special sandwiches these are just wonderful toasted and then topped with roasted veggies or tomatoes, some feta or goat cheese and a drizzle of oil and perhaps some good vinegar. They are made with Quebec organic unbleached wheat, water, extra virgin olive Oil, sea salt, yeast.

Recipes
This is a terrific week for a stir fry, you could throw nearly every single vegetable this week into the wok. Though I am skipping that recipe option, it's there for you if you are in that mood. The other super obvious easy direction is a roasted veggie meal, with the sea salt as the star topping. I see a meal of roast potatoes, onions, zucchini and peppers.

Roasted Veggie Focaccia
My suggestion for lunch this week involves roasting some veggies up in preparation.

Roasted red torpedo onions (following directions below)
Roasted red peppers (following directions above)
1/2 bunch Beet Greens
2-3 cloves Garlic
jalapeno (totally optional!)
goat cheese, or parm, or cheddar or whatever suits you

Roast peppers and onions in advance.

In a sauté pan, add a bit of oil and garlic and cook for no more than a minute. Add beet greens and saute until well wilted. Add a little red wine vinegar or balsamic at end.

Split the focaccia in half and toast one round in toaster oven. Brush with olive oil. Top with roasted veggies, beet greens/garlic, and cheese of choice, all mixed together.

Toast again until all is hot. Delicious.

Spinach Ravioli with Roasted Sweet Pepper Cream Sauce
This one also calls for roasting your peppers in advance.

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3 tablespoons packed fresh basil or
2 teaspoons dried
2 teaspoons packed fresh oregano or ½ teaspoon dried oregano
2 roasted red bell peppers (roast according to directions in Storage and Use Tips)

1 cup half-and-half

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil for your ravioli. Meanwhile begin the prep below. Add ravioli to pot and cook for 5 minutes to the pot while you are on the final step of the prep of your sauce below.

1. In medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Add onion; sauté until onion is tender. Add garlic; cook 1 minute longer and do not burn. Remove from heat; set aside.

2. In food processor , process basil and oregano until chopped. Add onion mixture and peppers. Process until smooth, scraping sides if necessary.

3. Add onion-pepper mixture to skillet. Over medium heat, heat to simmer. Add half-and-half, cayenne pepper, salt, and black pepper. Cook until mixture is thickened and
heated through. Serve hot over cooked ravioli.

Potato, Roasted Pepper and Mizuna Salad
Adapted from Epicurious.com. You can roast and peel peppers following the directions below. Anchovies are a great source of omega-3s. If you are not so sure you are an anchovy lover, try this recipe. You may change your mind. Serves 4.

2 pounds potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
3.5 TB dry white wine
2 mixed colored sweet peppers
half of a 2-ounce can flat fillets of anchovies, drained, minced
4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 cup olive or sunflower oil
2-3 red torpedo onions, sliced (or 1 bunch of green onions)
1 bunch mizuna, sliced

Place potatoes in large pot. Cover with water. Boil until potatoes are just tender. Drain well. Transfer to large bowl. Mix in white wine. Char red or yellow peppers over gas flame or in broiler until blackened on all sides. Wrap in paper bag and let stand 10 minutes. Peel and seed. Rinse if necessary; pat dry. Alternatively, grill green or red peppers at a lower temperature to color and soften, without a lot of char. Cut peppers into 3/4-inch squares. Transfer to medium bowl.

Combine anchovies and vinegar in small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Pour 2/3 cup dressing over peppers. Add remaining dressing, green onions and mizuna to potatoes and mix gently. Season peppers and potatoes with salt and pepper. Let stand 30 minutes. Gently mix peppers into potatoes. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before serving.)

Classic Oven Roasted Onions
Bursting with rich brown flavors, roasted onions can be a one-dish meal, a first course, a salad or side dish. For a simple supper, try the warm onions with balsamic, maybe a drizzle of olive oil, and a crumbling of a favorite blue cheese, mild fresh goat cheese, or sp,e parm or whatever appeals.

4 medium to large organic onions (yellow, red, white)

Spread a sheet of foil on oven rack and preheat to 400 degrees. Trim away root and a 1/4 inch of top of onions. Set root side down on foil, spacing about 2 inches apart. Roast 1 hour, or until easily pierced with a knife. Serve warm or at room temperature. Make 2-inch deep cross out of top of each onion, spread slightly and season.

Seasoning Ideas:
*salt and freshly ground black pepper, 2 TB wine vinegar and 1 TB extra-virgin olive oil
*3 TB balsamic vinegar and possibly 2 to 3 oz of Gorgonzola, Maytag Blue, fresh goat cheese, Parmigiano-Reggiano, Fontinella, or cheese of choice, crumbled or grated
*chopped fresh herbs, rice and grain salads.

Asian Greens with Ginger Miso Dressing
This dressing of ginger, miso, tahini (sesame paste) and lemon adds a creamy balance to organic baby spinach, arugula, mizuna, and baby asian green blends.
1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, coarsely chopped
2 TBS white miso
(or brown if you don't have white)
3 TBS tahini (sesame paste)
1/2 cup water
3 TBS fresh lemon juice

Salad:
5 ounces baby Asian salad mixed greens with mizuna
Several radishes or 1 small daikon, sliced into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
1 carrot, cut into 2-inch-long slender sticks

2 green onions (white part only), chopped
(or sub in slices red torpedo onions, sliced thin)

For the dressing, place ginger, miso, tahini, water and lemon juice in a blender and blend until completely smooth. The consistency should be similar to cream. Strain the dressing through a fine sieve to remove ginger fiber if desired (I never do).

For the salad, divide greens among serving plates. Arrange radish and carrot on top, then sprinkle with scallions/onions.
Drizzle one to two tablespoons of dressing over each salad and serve. Delightful recipe.

Good Eats Newsletter - September 1, 2010

This Week's Vegetable Share Contains:
Orange & Yellow Carrots; Shallots; Sweet Mixed Peppers; Yellow Swiss Chard; Leeks; Yellow Storage Onions; Radishes; Edamame; Savoy Cabbage; plus...

1 Bag Mesclun
1 Head Lettuce


Localvore Offerings Include:
Red Hen Grain & Seed Bread
Pa Pa Doodles Farm Eggs
Les Aliments Massawippi Tamari
Quebec Mixed Cracked Grains

Laughing Moon members will get their pizza dough this week.

MEAT SHARE MEMBERS - THIS IS A MEAT SHARE WEEK

Pete's Musings
Just your average August day at Pete's Greens. Here are some of the things that have already happened today. We harvested, washed, and packed 800 lbs of baby greens; picked and shucked 3 pallets of corn for freezing tomorrow; finished prepping and packed 300 gorgeous CSA shares; harvested piles of fennel that are at risk of going by in this heat; packed meat shares; containered tamari for tomorrows delivery, sent a bunch of veggies to stores and restaurants via Black River produce; worked on our new reefer truck; bushhogged several fields; tended the farmstand; fed and watered lots of chickens; weeded; answered dozens of emails; wrote a CSA newsletter; planned tomorrows fall crop planting, and it goes on. Thanks crew, we're getting it done. ~Pete

Sean's Adventures
This week Sean takes a short farm tour with Pete, gleaning tips and info on specific veggies out in the field. Check out Sean's blog.

Fall/Winter Good Eats Sign Up
The Fall share is a rich share period that inspires a great season of cooking. We are still harvesting much of the vegetables from the field at the start of the share. Remnants of summer such as tomatoes and peppers may appear, but by mid-November the offerings will be distinctly fall-like. Our root cellar will be overflowing with potatoes, onions, leeks, turnips, shallots, rutabagas, carrots, beets, cabbages, kohlrabi, celeriac, and winter squash. We expect to be harvesting baby greens such as head lettuce, and other hardy greens such as chard and kale into December. With each passing year, Pete gets better and better at growing salad greens and sprouts in the cold winter months and last year we succeeded in sending out fresh green salad fixings throughout the share. We intend to provide something fresh and green nearly every week this winter to compliment our wide variety of roots and storage crops. We will also be supplementing our stored crops and fresh greens with frozen item like tomatoes, corn, spinach, braising greens, winter squash, rhubarb, peppers and more. The combination of storage crops, hardy crops, greenhouse items and frozen and preserved veggies and fruits will keep us all eating a healthy, rich local diet all winter long.

Sign up for the Good Eats Fall/Winter Share now to ensure continued weekly deliveries! The Fall share begins on Oct 20th and continues through Feb 16th.
Please visit the Fall/Winter Share page for details and to download a sign up form.


Pete's Open Farm Day
Our open farm day this year was attended by around 200 people who came throughout the day. People really seemed to enjoy the tours of the farm, given via tractor/wagon ride. Our open farm coincided with the first annual Kingdom Farm & Food Days which was well attended by people wanting to visit all the open farms in the area and learn more about the food production happening here. There were quite a few people who planned their weekend around the event, visiting farms on Saturday, and then taking part in the workshops at High Mowing and eating well at the Local Foods Showcase on Sunday. This event will continue to evolve in the next couple of years and will be a really great weekend to plan to make time for. The planning is already underway for next year.
























Outstanding Blog Posts

Two great blog posts out this week about the Outstanding in the Field dinner held at the farm. Click below if you'd like to read more about the event.

Farm Plate blog
Piccante Dolce blog

Storage and Use Tips
Edamame - Soybean varieties grown for eating the beans from the pod are called edamame. Long common in the Japanese diet, in recent years edamame has been gaining popularity in the US and now I see kids in daycare with their little containers of beans for lunch. And no wonder because it's incredibly easy to prepare, the beans are delicious, and they pack a lot of nutrition into a very small package. A half cup of shelled edamame (from approx 1.25 cups of pods) contains 9 g fiber, 11 g protein, and a good amount of Vitas A and C. Edamame freezes really well too. Just blanch pods in boiling water for 2-3 mins, drain and cool in ice water, and freeze in a single layer, then bag. Edamame should not sit in the fridge for days before you get around to eating it. Like all beans they are better the fresher they are. If you won't eat them in the next few days, freeze them!

Yellow Swiss Chard - Chard comes in many varieties with stems gleaming in an array of gorgeous colors, this week yellow. I know that none of you need any introduction to Swiss chard but this morning I read an article about how most Americans don't get nearly enough potassium or magnesium. And then it went on to list top sources of both and chard was there at the top of the list for both nutrients. And of course it's at the top of the charts for vitamins K & A (you get more than 100% of your DV), C (you get more than 50%), and it's an excellent source of iron, Vita E, fiber, copper, calcium and the list goes on. How nice that it is also so versatile and delicious.

Localvore Lore
From Randy George at Red Hen Baking Co.
This week we are baking a bread that could be called "Four Grains and a Seed" that features some fun things grown in the area. There is wheat flour from both Aurora Farms and Gleason Grains, cornmeal from heirloom corn (Wahpsie Valley variety), flax from Canada, oats from Canada, and cracked rye. Many of you have probably had our Mad River Grain bread. This is a version that sticks a little closer to home in terms of the ingredient sourcing and is also a fair bit darker because we have used a higher proportion of Ben Gleason's whole wheat. Enjoy! ~ Randy

Two items in the share today from Isaac's Quebec trip. In North Hatley, Suzanne and Gilbert, owners of Les Aliments Massawippi, make very fine miso and miso-damari (aka tamari). Tamari literally means liquid pressed from soybeans, and for centuries it meant the thick brown liquid that pooled in casks of fermenting soybean miso. This tamari was a rare delicacy reserved for special occasions. The tamari in the share today was made by this slow natural process. It is an unpredictable process in terms of flavor and yield. Each time I call Gilbert to place a tamari order, what I give him is really just a wish list. It's not until after he presses the miso that we find out how much tamari will be available.

Eventually producers learned to brew tamari-like liquid soy sauce that had similar characteristics as the original by-product of miso. Most high end tamari is brewed from whole soybeans, sea salt, water, and koji (Aspergillus hacho) rather than pressed from naturally fermented miso. The newer method is a fast way to turn out a fairly consistent product that is similar to but not nearly the quality of the real thing. Commercial soy sauces (even some labeled as shoyu or tamari) are another step down and are usually made from soybeans that have been defatted with hexane, a petroleum derivative. Other common shortcuts are artificial fermentation methods including genetically engineered enzymes. Most soy sauce is actually caramel colored water with lots of salt, hydrochloric acid treated soy isolate, and sugar added.

This tamari is pretty special and rare. It is a live food and has never been pasteurized. This is a Soy Oats Barley Tamari. Please transfer to a small glass jar and for best quality and store in your fridge. It will last a very long time.

From Michel Gaudreau in Quebec we have his Mixed Cracked Grain cereal mix. This is a blend of 6 grains, including organic wheat, rye, oats, barley, spelt, and flax seed. The grains have been cracked for quicker cooking. This grains mix can be cooked and used as you would use bulghur wheat or barley, it can be cooked as a breakfast cereal, or added to breads and muffins for some whole grain goodness.

Pa Pa Doodles eggs again this week. Enjoy them, it will be two more weeks (Sep. 22) before you see them again. We are on a two week on, two week off schedule.

Meat Share
Tangletown Whole Peking Duck - I have been wanting to supply duck for a while. But it's hard to get and it can be expensive. Why is it pricey? Because it turns out ducks are notoriously hard and time consuming to pluck! So I was excited to get an email from Lila at Tangletown Farm telling me that she was going to have more ducks than she would have room for in her freezer. Tangletown Farm is a small family farm in Middlesex, Vermont. Lila Bennett & David Robb and their three children raise a diverse selection of organic and ethically raised animals for meat. They farm as a family with a vibrant commitment to healthy animals, healthy people, and sustainable agriculture. They purchase certified organic grain when available from growers in Addison county and believe strongly that Vermonters can thrive on VT grown food. All of the Chickens, Ducks, Guinea Hens, Turkeys, Rabbits, Lambs, Pigs and Cows are raised on lush pasture. You can meet Lila and Dave any week at the Montpelier and Waterbury Farmers' Markets.

Pete's Pastured Country Style Pork Ribs - Our pork has just returned from the butcher and we are in the meat business again, while it lasts! Our pigs are pasture raised on our farm, with acres and acres to call their own. They graze on the plants and grasses in the field, wallow in their mud hole when it's hot, and make use of lots of leftover vegetables on the farm. They live a supremely happy life, just being pigs. Because of the vegetation they take in, their meat is vitamin packed. Country style ribs are great, marinated and slow cooked, finishing them off on the grill or under the broiler. You can also cut them up and use them to make chili, stews, or a rustic pasta sauce. If you cook them slowly (1.5 to 2 hrs) in the oven and then finish them on the grill or at a higher oven temp, you will be rewarded with meat falling from the bone, tender, browned on the outside, tender on the inside ribs, no matter what flavor you make them. A simple BBQ recipe follows below.

Pete's Pastured Ground Beef - A second offering of our own this round as we have recently put some of our beef in the freezer. We raise our beef in partnership with friend and neighbor Bruce Urie. Our beef are raised on pasture, and fed Bruce's own hay in winter supplemented with some beet pulp and soy. Like their pig friends and neighbors, they spend their days on pasture, un-medicated, hormone free, stress free.

Recipes

Leek and Swiss Chard Tart
This recipe comes together quickly after sautéeing the leeks and the chard for a few minutes. Although the recipe here calls for puff pastry, you can line your pie plate with a regular pie crust or change it up by adding several layers of filo dough instead. Your choice. You could reduce the fat by switching from full cream to part cream, part milk. You could even go to straight milk though you will lose some of the rich flavor of the dish. The recipe comes from Bon Appétit October 1999 and makes 8 servings.

1 sheet frozen puff pastry (half of 17.3-ounce package), thawed

2 tablespoons butter
3 large leeks (white and pale green parts only), coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 bunch Swiss chard, ribs removed, leaves chopped (about 2 1/2 cups)

1 1/4 cups whipping cream
3 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Pinch of ground nutmeg

Roll out pastry on floured work surface to 12-inch square. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish. Trim overhang to 1 inch. Fold under; crimp edges. Cover; chill.

Melt butter in large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Add leeks and thyme. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover; cook until leeks are very tender but not brown, stirring often, about 10 minutes. Add chard; saut until wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat; cool.
Position rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 425°F. Whisk cream and next 5 ingredients in large bowl. Mix in cooled leek mixture. Pour filling into crust.

Bake tart 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°F and bake until filling is puffed and just set in center, about 15 minutes longer. (Tart will take longer to cook if using more milk, less cream.) Transfer to rack; cool 10 minutes.

Roasted Carrots And Leeks Recipe
serves 8

8 large carrots
4 large leeks
Extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon crumbled dried tarragon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Wash and peel carrots and cut into 1-inch chunks, or, if using smaller carrots, cut slightly longer pieces. Trim leeks, reserving tough parts for making stock if you wish. Split leeks in the middle lengthwise and wash thoroughly to remove any sand and dirt. Cut into lengths about the same size as the carrots.

Pour olive oil to cover the bottom of a heavy-bottomed, oven-proof skillet. Heat and add carrots; toss and pan-roast until vegetables begin to brown a little. Add tarragon and salt and pepper. Transfer to a baking sheet and place in oven.

Add a little additional olive oil to the pan and saute leeks until they wilt and begin to caramelize. After carrots have baked for about 1 hour (less time if using small carrots), add leeks, toss with carrots and continue baking for about 15 minutes more, or until vegetables can easily be pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes.
Curry Carrot-Leek Soup

1 pound thinly sliced leeks, white parts only
1 pound carrots, coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons butter or stick margarine
1 medium potato, peeled and diced
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

In a large saucepan, saute leeks and carrots in butter until leeks are tender. Add potato and curry powder; cook and stir for 2 minutes. Add broth, salt and pepper; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until the vegetables are very tender. Cool slightly. Process in batches in a food processor or blender until pureed. Return to the pan; heat through.


Tahini Tamari Lemon Dressing
This is yummy dressing. You can swap the olive oil for sunflower oil. You can skip the nutritional yeast though it does add depth to the flavor. The dressing is great on green salads (it's similar to Amy's Goddess dressing) and also great as a fresh veggie dip and with falafel.

2/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
1/3 cup tahini
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
1/4 cup tamari
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
salt and pepper to taste

In a blender, combine olive oil, lemon juice, tahini, nutritional yeast, tamari, honey, oregano, mayonnaise and salt and pepper. Process until smooth and serve over salad.

Edamame

whole fresh edamame pods
salt (preferably sea salt or kosher salt)

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add edamame and continue boiling until beans are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. To prevent overcooking, start checking for doneness approximately 7 minutes after cooking. (To check, remove one carefully, dip in cold water to cool, and taste.)

When done, run cold water over, or put in ice water, to stop cooking. Drain well; pat excess moisture off, and sprinkle with salt to taste. (Start with 1/2 teaspoon.)

To eat, hold pod by stem end, and slide the individual beans out with your teeth. Discard pod.


Mixed Cracked Grains
The recipe below gives the very basic method of cooking mixed cracked grains. There are many, many ways to play with cooked grains though. For a special breakfast cereal, cook them with part water and part milk and add dried fruit, nuts, cinnamon and maple syrup or sugar (as you would for oatmeal). Or cook them with broth as you would a risotto. Cook them plain and use them in a salad, dressed with a special dressing to flavor the whole dish. Or bake the cooked grains with vegetables and or meats and some seasoning in the oven for a hearty meal. The cooked grains can be kept in the fridge for a week, so cook up a pot and see what uses you might find for them during the week. Many mixed grains recipes have rice as part of the blend. You can try adding 1 part uncooked brown rice to 3 or 4 parts mixed cracked grains and cooking them together.

Basic Recipe
1 cup Mixed Cracked Grains
3 cups water
1/2 tsp salt

Boil water, add grains and salt. Cover and simmer until tender, about 35 minutes. Drain if necessary.

Ground Beef and Savoy Cabbage Lo Mein

12oz ground beef
1 onion
2 cloves garlic
1 tsp minced ginger
1/2 head savoy cabbage
1 medium carrot
1 sweet pepper
4 oz spaghetti - about 1 1/4" (3cm) diameter
2 tsp olive oil
1 cup beef stock
1 tbs tamari
2 tbs sherry
1 tbs cornstarch

Cook pasta according to package instructions.
While pasta cooks: Thinly slice onion. Mince garlic. Mince ginger (peel first). Cut carrot into matchsticks. Slice pepper into thin strips. Remove dark green outer leaves from cabbage. Cut off a thick slice, avoiding the core. Lay flat, cut into 3 or 4 wedges, then thinly slice the wedges
Heat olive oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and carrot to skillet; stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, peppers, cabbage and stir-fry another 3 minutes. Remove vegetables from skillet and set aside. Add beef, and fry, breaking it up as it browns. Return vegetables to pan. Add beef stock and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk together sherry, tamari and cornstarch. Uncover skillet and stir in cornstarch mixture until thickened.

When pasta is done, drain and add to skillet. Toss to combine, tongs work best, or two forks. Serve. (If spaghetti doesn't fit into pan, put it into a large bowl and pour beef and vegetables on top.) Add more tamari if desired, according to taste.

BBQ Country Style Ribs
This recipe was reviewed by over 200 users of allrecipes.com, most giving it 5 stars. Not surprising as the method is perfect for this cut of meat and the lemon slices on top help tenderize the meat while it cooks. You could use any BBQ sauce for this, or just serve the ribs plain if you have picky kids in the house. They'll be yummy regardless. Some reviewers covered the ribs with foil for the first 2 hours to keep the more moist.

10 country style pork ribs
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 (18 ounce) bottle barbeque sauce

Preheat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C).
In a shallow baking pan or roaster, place ribs in a single layer; salt if desired. Spread the garlic on the ribs, then place the lemon slices on top. Bake in a preheated oven for 2 hours - the ribs should be tender. Drain any grease and liquid. Pour BBQ sauce over the ribs. Return to oven and bake one more hour at 200 to 250 degrees F.

Oven Roasted, Delicious and Tender Tangletown Duck:
This is Lila and Dave's method for roasting their ducks in the oven. Though duck meat is quite lean, there is a layer of fat under the skin of ducks so drippings will be copious. Be watchful in case the fat should catch fire (less of a concern in the oven than on the grill).

1 Whole Duck

For stuffing (none of this is set in stone - use what you have)
3/4 cup celery - chopped
1.5 cups onions, chopped
1/2 apple, chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
fresh herbs (thyme,oregano and sage are favorites)
Seeded Baguette, pre toasted and cut into small cubes

Preheat Oven to 350.
Mince at least 2 cloves garlic and rub over entire duck.
Place ON A RACK in a roasting pan. (this is important so as to let the fat from
the skin drip out).
Remove heart, neck and liver from cavity. Add stuffing to the cavity.

Gently make a few smalles holes in the breast and back of your duck. This is to
allow the fat to be released more evenly.

Put the duck in the oven, breast sided down. reduce the temperature to 275.
Cook slowly for 2 and a half hours or so.
Pull the duck out and flip over. Increase the heat to 300 and cook for another
30-45 minutes until the duck is fully browned. it will be more time for a duck
over five pounds, less for a duck under four pounds.

Drain the fat out of the pan. Save for later use in other recipes. Or, add garlic and herbs and make the fat into a rich gravy. Be careful not to over-cook your duck. Duck meat by nature is very lean, even though the skin has quite a bit of fat. The meat is flavorful and tender when cooked carefully and thoroughly.

Grilled Duck
So, there are two ways to grill duck: with a small grill fire or a large one. Meaning not what temperature you heat your grill to when you begin, meaning that you can either cause a small grill fire or a large one while cooking. Cooking a duck on the grill equals fire. No matter how you choose to grill your duck, keep you eyes on the duck at all times. All methods below have been tested thoroughly by Lila and Dave.

For a smaller fire:
Cut your duck in half. Cooking halves is much easier, and only takes a minute to cut the duck in half with a very sharp knife. Rub your favorite seasonings on the duck. We usually use salt and pepper only, as the duck flavor stands alone. We have marinated in barbecue sauce, or garlic herbs and a dash of olive oil as well. For a small grill fire, gently poke some holes into the breast and back of your duck (about 1" apart and piercing through both skin and fat until the knife tip meets the resistance of the duck meat below). Pan sear for a few minutes to just cook out some of the fat. Keep the duck moving a bit in the pan so as not to begin to cook the meat very much. Because duck meat is very lean it is important to cook the meat slowly to keep it from toughening.
Turn your grill on Medium.
Wrap your duck halves in foil, and place on the grill with the open carcass side down. Cook for 7-10 minutes, with the cover on the grill. Wait until you hear dripping and sizzling a bit going on. Then flip the duck and cook for about five minutes.
Now, remove the foil, and let the duck brown.

If the fire is getting big, take the duck off, let the fire burn out, and start again.

Duck is done when the skin is thin and crispy, and the duck is brown all over. If skin is not thin and crispy, the fat underneath has not been cooked off.

You can use the method above to grill a whole duck. Just wrap in foil and grill for 40 minutes or so. Then cook uncovered to brown.

If you want to grill the duck without foil, cut the duck into smaller pieces, and grill like small pieces of chicken. If you remove the skin from the duck breast, cook carefully so as not to overcook and toughen the meat. It is REALLY good this way. Like the steak of poultry.

For a large fire, cut the duck in halves or parts and put it on the grill. Turn the pieces continuously for about 12-15 minutes, avoiding the large flames ensuing from your grill. Cook until the fire is just subsiding. We have cooked half a duck at a time to keep the fat at bay. Usually after the fire completely chars the outside of the duck it is done and tender, and you eat it immediately. If you wait to eat for more than 30 minutes, the meat will cool and toughen.