Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Good Eats Newsletter - August 15, 2012



 
 
Localvore Members 
& Regular Veggie Only Share Members
take a LIGHT GREEN BAG
 
This week your bag will contain:
 
Mesclun; Mixed Potatoes; Arrowhead Cabbage; Eggplant; Green Bell Pepper; Fennel; Zucchini; Leek; Parsley; Garlic;
 
plus, out of the bag:
6 Ears of Sweet Corn
 
Localvore Offerings Include:
Red Hen Potato Bread
Cider Vinegar
Plymouth Cheese
 
 
Small Veggie Only Members
take a YELLOW BAG
containing:
 
Mesclun; Mixed Potatoes; Carrots; Arrowhead Cabbage;
Green Bell Pepper, Leek, Zucchini
 
plus, out of the bag:
6 Ears of Sweet Corn
 
 
Come out to the Farm!
Bring the kids,
bring a friend!
 
September 29th is our
Harvest Celebration.
 
 
We'll be having farm tours and snacks all afternoon. 
 
In the evening we are planning a great farm dinner. 
 
And we have a special event in the evening too, stay tuned for more details or check our website for news about this event! 
 
 
 
 
Storage and Use Tips
 
Arrowhead Cabbage - The pointed cabbage in your bags this week is Arrowhead, an early summer cabbage, mellower in flavor than storage cabbages, and can be used in all kinds.  Arrowhead cabbage is most similar to green cabbage, but you can use in many other cabbage recipes too.  It's pretty versatile.  Make slaw, your favorite cabbage dish, or quarter it and drizzle olive oil on it, sprinkle with salt, and grill it.  Add a little teriyaki sauce if you like. Yum.
 
Parsley - Much more than a garnish, parsley has lots to offer. Chopped parsley can be sprinkled on a host of different recipes, including salads, vegetable sautés and grilled fish. Combine chopped parsley, garlic and lemon zest, and use it as a rub for chicken, lamb and beef. Add it to soups and tomato sauces. It is a key flavor ingredient in the mediterranean dish tabouli and in the Argentinian chimichurri sauce (recipe below). Parsley is one of those vegetables with huge nutritional benefits, even when using just a couple tablespoons of the minced green. The vitamin content is very high (particularly vitas A, C, K, and folic acid). And what's more, the activity of parsley's volatile oils qualifies it as a "chemoprotective" food, a food that can help neutralize particular types of carcinogens.

 
Veggie Storage and Use Tips are our website too, so please bookmark the recipe and storage tip section. I am sure you will find it useful.
 
 
Around the Farm
 
Every week now through Fall we are running at full tilt.  The harvest crew is in continuous motion picking & bunching & stacking.  We have the most gorgeous Fall crops coming, just picture perfect fields of potatoes, leeks (below left), beets (below right) storage cabbage, turnips, carrots, onions, squash and the list goes on and on and on.  Deb is at it every day in the kitchen working away to preserve the harvest for winter eating.  Sometimes there's warning, and sometimes it's just a new discovery "Deb we have a pallet of peppers, what would you like to do with them?" Just this week we have put up frozen beans, corn, broccoli, beans, tomatoes and made pesto.  She's made pickles and tomato sauce.  And so much more will happen in the next 2 months.  It's a constant flow of food from the field through our collective worlds.  Just in time, Isaac has completed the walk in freezer we have waited so long for.  Our freezer burned with the barn in Jan 2011 and since then we have managed by keeping the bulk of our frozen food in a commercial freezer locker in Williston.  We have stopped there once a week for the last 18 months to drop off and pick up food. It is so nice to be able to put food away in our own facility again. 

 
High Mowing Field Days and Kingdom Farm and Food Days This Weekend!
 
Though we will not be holding our picnic this Saturday, there are still farms in the region that will welcome visitors.
 
On Sunday Aug 19th, join High Mowing Organic Seeds for the annual HMS summer field day. There will be a variety of educational workshops for professional growers and home gardeners. Through out the day there will be guided tours of some of over 800 vegetable, herb and flower varieties being compared and evaluated in the 4-acre HMS Trials Field.
 
On Sunday afternoon, the New England Culinary Institute (NECI) will present an amazing array of locally produced food for the Local Foods Showcase. This is an extraordinary chance for visitors to taste some of the fin­est Vermont-made food products and culinary delights, all donated by local businesses and prepared by NECI students and Chef Ryan O’Malley.  All of Sunday’s festivities will be held at the High Mowing Organic Seeds Trials & Showcase Gardens on Marsh Road in Wolcott, VT.
 
Please visit the Kingdom Farm and Food Days website and the High Mowing Seeds website for more information.
 
 
 
Changes to Your Delivery?
If you will be away some upcoming week, and need to make changes to your share delivery, let us know at least 1 week before the change. You can have your share donated to the Food Pantry, or you can skip your share delivery and you will retain a credit on your account toward the purchase of your next share.
 
 
 
Localvore Lore
 
We have a special loaf this week baked for us at Red Hen:
This week's bread is a special potato bread made from an assortment of potatoes that came to us straight from Pete.  We roasted them whole in the bread oven and threw them in the bread dough.  Although we regularly make a potato bread with Vermont potatoes,  we're making this one a little differently to accentuate the flavors of the different potatoes from the farm.  There is a natural starter made with Gleason Grains' stoneground and sifted flour, and there is also just smattering of baker's yeast added to the final dough.  This makes the bread a little milder so that the potatoes can take center stage.  Since the starch in the potatoes holds moisture so well, this bread keeps very nicely.  Enjoy! ~ Randy

The cider vinegar in the share today is special stuff.  Gingerbrook Farm in South Washington, VT is home to Bob Machim and Joann Lidell. Bob and Joann carved their homestead out of the woods of South Washington, VT 40 years ago. As they cleared for their fields, they found wild apple trees and decided to keep them. It is from these trees and others nearby their farm that Bob makes their cider vinegar. This is the real macoy, Honest-to-Goodness cider vinegar as they call it, a health tonic, and almost good enough to drink straight! It starts with unpasteurized apple cider that Bob seeds with a "mother" culture of yeast that ferments the cider. The difference between apple cider gone bad due to the infiltration of natural airborne yeasts and a good artisanal cider vinegar is in controlling the process. The mother culture makes a big difference, as does the fresh cider used for the vinegar, and the aging process. Bob ages this vinegar for two years in big wooden barrels in a corner of his home. In time, you may find a slippery gelatinous mass forms in your cider vinegar. Fear not! This is just more "mother" forming in your jar. Just remove it from jar and continue to use your vinegar. This is a great tasty vingear to use in dressings or whenever vinegar will take center stage. 
 
Plymouth Artison Cheese is made in the second oldest cheese production facility in the US.  Started by John Coolidge, father of President Calvin Coolidge in 1880, Plymouth cheese was made by the Coolidge family continuously until 1998 save for a 30 year break following the depresssion years when not enough milk could be found for making cheese.  In 1998, John's grandson John at age 92 sold the cheese factory to the State of Vermont where it remains part of the Calvin Coolidge Historic Site.  In 2009 Jeese Werner took over the cheese factory and reintroduced Plymouth Cheese once again.  The cheese is made from milk that comes from a single herd of neighboring cows.  Though the cheese is not exactly a cheddar, it's a granular curd cheese, and is very similar to a cheddar. It's a great tasting cheese for sandwiches or a cheese plate.
 
 
 
Recipes
 
Leek, Potato and Zucchini Pancakes
Serve these savory pancakes alongside a lightly dressed green salad.

½ lb potatoes
Salt
1-2 large leek, sliced crosswise into 1/8-inch-wide pieces (to make about 4 cups), and thoroughly rinsed
1 cup shredded zucchini
1 large egg, beaten
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves
Black pepper
2 tablespoons canola or olive oil

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place potato on a small pan and bake until tender when pierced with a fork, about 1 hour. Let cool. Peel, discarding the skin, and shred the potato on the large holes of a box grater. Set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add leeks and cook until tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Strain. Place the leeks in a dishtowel and twist firmly and repeatedly to remove excess moisture; the leeks will shrink greatly. Set aside.

Place zucchini in a bowl and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let sit for 10 minutes. Place the zucchini in a dishtowel and twist firmly and repeatedly to remove excess moisture. The zucchini will shrink greatly. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the potato, leeks, zucchini, egg, flour, cheese and parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix well. In a large skillet over medium heat, add oil and heat until shimmering. Measure 1/4 cup of the leek and potato mixture and form into a patty about 2/3 of an inch thick. Repeat with the remainder of the mixture.
Working in batches, if necessary, fry the cakes, flattening them with a spatula, until they are golden brown on each side, 4 to 5 minutes a side.  Serve with green salad and enjoy!
 
 
 
Eggplant, Zucchini and Fennel Casserole

1 lb eggplant
1 zucchini

1/4 cup olive oil

2 medium onions, finely sliced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 large green pepper, cored and sliced into strips

1 fresh fennel bulb, sliced fine, fronds chopped

 
2 cups tomatoes, chopped fresh or canned OK
2 tablespoons chopped, fresh basil or parsley
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Ricotta or fresh mozz or other cheese optional

Wash and dry the eggplants. Cut off stems and discard, but do not peel. Cut into thin slices. Wash and dry the zucchini. Cut off stems and slice zucchini thinly.
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
In a large skillet heat 2 tablespoons oil and saute the eggplant slices. Repeat with the zucchini and set aside. Add more oil and saute onion and garlic for 5 minutes. Add peppers, fennel, tomatoes and basil and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes.

In an ovenproof dish arrange a layer of eggplant, then zucchini. Add some of the tomato mixture season with salt and pepper. Repeat layering until all the ingredients are used (and layer in the cheese here if you choose to use it).  Cover with foil and bake for 1 hour.

 
Baingan Bharta (Eggplant Curry)
A traditional Indian dish (though perhaps not a totally traditional recipe), and a great, easy, delicious way to serve up eggplant.  Serve alongside rice or pearled barley.

1 large eggplant
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon ginger garlic paste (or several cloves of garlic and a smaller than thumb sized piece of fresh ginger chopped)
1 tablespoon curry powder (or good garam masala if you have that)
1 tomato, diced
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1 fresh jalapeno chile pepper, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 bunch cilantro, finely chopped (optional but good, could also use some parsley here)


Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).

Place eggplant on a medium baking sheet. Bake 20 to 30 minutes in the preheated oven, until tender. Remove from heat, cool, peel, and chop.
Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Mix in cumin seeds and onion. Cook and stir until onion is tender.
Mix ginger garlic paste, curry powder, and tomato into the saucepan, and cook about 1 minute. Stir in yogurt. Mix in eggplant and jalapeno pepper, and season with salt. Cover, and cook 10 minutes over high heat. Remove cover, reduce heat to low, and continue cooking about 5 minutes. Garnish with cilantro or parsley to serve.


 

Carolina Slaw
A tasty vinegar based slaw that keeps well and is delicious.  Modify the amounts of ingredients  to suit your taste, this recipe is very flexible.

1 large head of cabbage, finely shredded
1 medium bell pepper, finely chopped
1 medium sweet onion, finely chopped
2 carrots, grated

1/2 to 1 cup sugar
1 cup cider vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoon dry mustard
2 teaspoon celery seed
  
In a saucepan over medium heat, combine dressing ingredients; bring to a boil. Simmer, stirring, until sugar is dissolved; pour over vegetables and toss well. Cover and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled.
 
 
 
Parsley Chimichurri
This parsley packed condiment is a staple in Argentina where it is always served alongside meats.  It is also terrific spread on sandwiches, alongside grilled potatoes, and to liven up a plate of eggs and toast.  It's been popular in the farmstand lately, can't seem to keep it on the shelves!

1 cup (packed) fresh parsley
1/2 cup olive oil
1/3 cup red wine vinegar  or cider vinegar
1/4 cup (packed) fresh cilantro
2 garlic cloves, peeled
3/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt


 
 
 

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