Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 22, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Ramps, Green Garlic, Parsley, Fennel, Parsnips, Onions, Potatoes
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Basil (IN YOUR MESCLUN), Green Garlic, Parsnips, Onions, Potatoes
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers

LEAN & GREEN

Red Russian Kale, Cucumber, Green Garlic, Pac Choi, Fennel
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Sweet Peppers
*BAGS THIS WEEK ARE EITHER ORANGE OR GREEN!*

Pantry/ Localvore Items

Whole Wheat Bread Flour: From Gleason Grains in Bridport, VT. This week we have a Whole Wheat Bread Flour. The bread flour in the share is milled on Ben Gleason's farm from hard winter wheat. Ben plants his winter wheat in September. It grows until frost, then is covered over by snow. In the spring, it begins growing again after the snow has melted. He harvests this wheat in mid- July. If you aren't going to use it up quickly, consider keeping it in the freezer. Because whole-wheat flour contains the germ and its oils, unlike in white flour, it can go rancid after a few months if kept at room temp.
Not a bread baker? Have no fear! I just consulted with Bon Appetit about the difference between bread and all-purpose flour, and here's what I found out:
The main difference between bread flour and all-purpose flour is a matter of protein. Bread flour, which comes in white and whole wheat varieties, has a higher protein content than all-purpose, usually 11-13%. It’s called “bread flour” because most bread requires higher amounts of protein to produce lots of gluten. Gluten is the stringy strands that give bread dough its stretch and elasticity, and baked bread its characteristic chew. Kneading dough develops a network of gluten strands that trap air and produce the airy holes characteristic of many breads. You can use bread flour in place of AP flour when you actually want a chewier result—in pizza dough, for instance—but you don't want to use it in place of cake or pastry flour, or in any baked goods that you want to be light and tender.
Axel's Fresh Eggs! Raised locally.
Cheese share: This week it's Harbison from the Cellars at Jasper Hill. This cheese has consistently taken home top honors in national and international competitions over the last several years. This cheese is named for Anne Harbison, affectionately known as the grandmother of Greensboro, who died last year. Along with breathtaking views, traditions and people are part of what makes Vermont's working landscape special; they're proud to honor Ms. Harbison's legacy with this cheese. Harbison is a soft-ripened cheese with a rustic, bloomy rind. Young cheeses are wrapped in strips of spruce cambium, the tree's inner bark layer, harvested from the woodlands of Jasper Hill. The spoonable texture begins to develop in our vaults, though the paste continues to soften on the way to market. Harbison is woodsy and sweet, balanced with lemon, mustard, and vegetal flavors. If the bark has fused with the outer rind, leave the bark intact and spoon out portions from the top. Don't be afraid of the greenish bluish mold on the outside- this is normal and can be peeled off or eaten around. Enjoy!

The Spring Share ends soon!

Only TWO weeks left of the spring eating season! Our new customizable share system takes effect June 12.
I keep adding more info online in response to your questions as you all become more familiar with the Farmigo program and your member accounts. You'll log in with your email address and the password farmfresh . If you've ever had a Farmigo account before, you will use the password previously created. If farmfresh doesn't work, you can click the "reset my password" button.
If you don't add any money to your account balance, your shares will end on June 5. You'll need to add more money to your account to continue receiving shares. A big difference of this system is that we won't have 17-week seasons anymore. Your shares are ongoing and payment is automatically renewed.
Another big change? We will be packing out the shares individually, with each share labeled with your name. Everything in one place! I'm working through our stock of plastic bags, which is why the Lean & Green share members will start receiving their shares in the orange bags! This week half the shares are in green bags, the other half in orange bags.

Around the Farm

This share is proof that spring is here! We've turned a small corner... we welcome back fennel (one of my favorites). We have a good crop of green garlic, and we have spring dug parsnips! They're so beautiful this year. Tim says he hasn't seen them this beautiful from our farm in years!
I just wrote that I love fennel, and if you would've asked me three years ago if I liked fennel, or had even ever tried it, I would have turned up my nose in disgust. And then I not only received the CSA share as a member, but I had to familiarize myself with the veggies that I put into the CSA shares. So I tried fennel and discovered I love it. The beauty of a CSA share!! I'm so excited to see it back. This is baby fennel, too, so it's nice and tender.
I hope you join us for a summer of good eating - fresh veggies straight from our fields to your tables. Maybe you'll find your new favorite veggie or maybe you'll take advantage of the customizable option and change what you get in your share so you always get your favorite veggie!
~Taylar
Spring dug parsnips take on a little different texture than the storage variety harvested in fall after overwintering in the ground!
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: Such a diversity of greens! These greens are the last of our winter greenhouse greens plus a little of our fresh field greens.
Bagged Red Russian Kale: Not quite baby kale, not quite bunched kale! This is medium-sized kale. Enjoy as a salad or cooked down.
ParsnipsContrary to appearances, parsnips are not pale versions of carrots. In fact, they have a nutty-sweet taste and a tender-hearty texture that is entirely distinct. For centuries, parsnips were a more common staple than the potato—and deservedly so. Satisfying, versatile, and highly nutritious, these delicious roots make a terrific base to any meal. Young parsnips don’t need to be peeled. Simply scrub them under running water with a vegetable brush. Peel larger parsnips, and cut out the core if it seems woody. However you slice or chop parsnips, be sure to make all the pieces relatively the same size, ensuring an evenly cooked dish. Refrigerate unwashed parsnips in a loosely wrapped or perforated plastic bag for up to two weeks. Half of a large parsnip will store well in the fridge so you don't need to eat it all at once.
The thing I love about these parsnips is they've been in the ground all winter and were just harvested on Monday! It seems strange but they don't develop their sweet, almost nutty flavor fully until after they've been through a few hard frosts or a winter.  Enjoy these parsnips sliced thinly and sauteed in a little butter over a low flame until they're tender.
Fennel: Crunchy and slightly sweet with the flavor of anise, fennel is delicious served raw but is just as often served cooked on its own or in other dishes. Though most often associated with Italian cooking, it has an uncanny ability to blend with other flavors adding a light and fresh note. It is delightful in soups and stews and sauces and is particularly at home with tomato sauce dishes. Fennel is composed of a white or pale green bulb from which closely superimposed stalks are arranged. To prepare, cut off the hard bottom and slice vertically or into quarters. Or cut the bulb in half lengthwise, cut out the core, and cut into strips. Add it raw to salads or try some thinly sliced fennel on your sandwich. Top thinly sliced fennel with plain yogurt and mint leaves. Or braise, roast or saute it. It is done when tender enough to pierce easily with a skewer.
European Cucumbers - These long, skinny cukes taste like a burst of summer. In an ideal world they like to be kept at about 50 degrees or they may go soft in a couple days. I keep mine bagged and toss them in the crisper drawer and they keep a few days longer than that. But this time of year, they get eaten too fast and storage isn't an issue. This is our first crop of them - enjoy!!
Basil: This versatile herb is a member of the mint family. It is a staple in Mediterranean cooking as well as other cuisines. The herb is highly aromatic, or put another way, the oils in basil are highly volatile. Thus, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process, so it will retain its maximum essence and flavor. Basil should be kept in a plastic bag or kept stems down in a glass of water with plastic over the leaves for about a week with regular water changing. Keep your basil out of the extreme cold as it could damage the fragile leaves. *Basil is in the MESCLUN*
Green Garlic Scallions: Green garlic is garlic that is still fresh, and not cured. It is actually the result of thinning out our garlic rows! Keep this in your fridge and use as you regularly would use garlic.
Frozen Sweet Peppers - this week all share members will receive a package of our frozen sweet peppers. Keep them frozen into you are ready to use them. Frozen peppers tend to not have the same rigidity as fresh peppers but retain all the flavors and yummy summer goodness. They will be delicious sautéed and thrown onto a pizza, or cooked into lasagna, casseroles, soups, or sauces. 
Ivan showing our spring dug parsnips before they get cleaned. The parsnips are harvested with their tops. We trim them off and clean up the roots before sending them out to you.
 

Recipes

Stir Fried Bok Choy with Garlic
You could add another cooked green to this recipe to make it a more filling meal. This would be a great side with a rich meal.
1/3 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
1/4 cup thinly sliced garlic (cloves or green garlic)
2 pounds bok choy, halved lengthwise
2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil
Stir together broth, soy sauce, cornstarch, and 1/2 teaspoon salt until cornstarch has dissolved. Heat wok over high heat until a drop of water evaporates instantly. Pour peanut oil down side of wok, then swirl oil, tilting wok to coat side. Add garlic and stir-fry until pale golden, 5 to 10 seconds. Add half of bok choy and stir-fry until leaves wilt, about 2 minutes, then add remaining bok choy and stir-fry until all leaves are bright green and limp, 2 to 3 minutes total. Stir broth mixture, then pour into wok and stir-fry 15 seconds. Cover with lid and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are crisp-tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Stir in sesame oil, then transfer to a serving dish.
Steamed Parsnips with Sweet Butter Sauce
Serves 3 to 4
parsnips, sliced lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick strips
1/4 cup butter
1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1. Place the parsnips in a steamer basket set over 1 1/2 inches boiling water and cover. Steam for 10 to 15 minutes depending on size. Transfer to a serving bowl.
2. Melt the butter in a small pot over medium heat. Remove the pot from heat and stir in the maple syrup or honey.
3. Pour the butter mixture over the parsnips. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
Excerpted from Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables: Seasonal Recipes and Stories from a Community Supported Farm by Farmer John Peterson & Angelic Organics (Gibbs Smith Publisher).
Kale with Garlic and Oven-Roasted Parsnips
1 1/4 pound(s) parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-by-1/2-inch sticks
5 tablespoon(s) extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 bunch kale, stemmed
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
8 large scallions, cut into 1/2-inch lengths
Preheat the oven to 400°F. Spread the parsnips on a large rimmed baking sheet and toss with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and roast in the bottom third of the oven for about 25 minutes, or until lightly browned on the bottom and tender.
Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add salt and then the kale and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain and then squeeze out the excess water. Coarsely chop the kale.
Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and cook over moderate heat until golden, about 2 minutes. Add the scallions and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the kale, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until heated through, about 3 minutes.
To serve, add the parsnips to the kale and warm through over moderate heat.
Braised Parsnips
Here's an easy and tasty way to prepare your parsnips.
1 bunch parsnips
3 tbsp. butter
1 pinch salt, pepper, and nutmeg
Chopped parsley
Clean and scrape parsnips. Slice lengthwise. Melt butter in a skillet; add parsnips and seasonings and cook covered over low heat until tender. Serve garnished with finely chopped parsley.

Fennel And Kale Pasta
Sweet fennel and greens work beautifully together.
1⁄2 c olive oil
1 onion, minced
1 medium fennel bulb fronds removed, halved and thinly sliced
salt and pepper
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 lb spaghetti
up to 3 lb kale or other cooking green washed and chopped
1 c grated parmesan
Heat oil in a large braising pan or skillet with a cover. Add onion; sauté over medium heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in fennel; sauté until golden, about 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat until fennel is tender, about 8 minutes longer. Stir in vinegar; simmer to blend flavors, 1 minute longer. Adjust seasonings.
Meanwhile, bring 4 quarts water to boil in large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt and the pasta; return to boil. Add kale; continue to cook until pasta is al dente, about 7 minutes.
Drain pasta and greens; toss with fennel mixture and cheese. Transfer portions to warm pasta bowls. Garnish with reserved minced fennel fronds. Serve immediately with more cheese passed separately.
Braised Fennel and Potatoes
In this dish the potatoes are perked up with fennel. The fennel becomes very tender and lends loads of moisture to the dish. Gourmet February 2006.
1 large fennel bulb with fronds
1 large onion, halved lengthwise, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices (2 cups)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lb potatoes
1/2 cup water
Quarter bulb lengthwise and core, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Cook fennel, onion, pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, covered, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, about 5 minutes.Meanwhile, cut potatoes crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Add potatoes and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt to fennel mixture and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently, 3 minutes. Add water and cook, covered, stirring once, until potatoes are tender, 10 to 12 minutes more.
Ben Gleason's Whole Wheat Pancakes
2 cups milk
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup blueberries
2 teaspoons honey
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 egg
2 tablespoons butter
Preheat griddle or frying pan on medium heat. Mix milk, eggs, and honey until frothy. Add butter and mix. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Gently stir dry ingredients into wet. Fold blueberries in gently. Do not over mix, even though batter may be a bit lumpy and runny.
Melt a teaspoon of butter and spread over pan. Ladle 1/4-1/2 cup of batter for each pancake. Cook the pancakes until bubbles appear on top, flip over, and cook for another 1 or 2 minutes until done. Add more butter to pan as needed.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
Pssst! Did you notice that with your new member account, you won't have to email me anymore! You'll be able to make the change on your own!! Schedule up to a year in advance!
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 15, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Basil (IN your mesclun), Spinach, Chard, Cucumber, Fiddleheads, Onions, and Carrots

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun OR Spinach, Spinach, Chard OR Pac Choi, Cucumber, Fiddleheads, Onions, and Carrots

LEAN & GREEN


Mesclun, Basil (IN your mesclun), Lettuce, Chard, Carrots, Cucumber, Spinach Bunch

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Cellars at Jasper Hill Willoughby: This is a washed-rind soft cow's milk cheese with a buttery and complex flavor, and a gooey interior. It pairs well with rose wine, saison beer, or raw honey. While not for everyone, the gooey soft cheeses are staple items in my house, and Jasper Hill excels at them! I encourage to try soft cheese like Willoughby with an open mind and a ready palate. With the soft cheeses, it's always best to eat them at room temperature, so let it sit out for a bit before indulging. The backstory on this cheese is an interesting one. Pantry Share members familiar with our CSA have had butter from Marisa Mauro at Ploughgate Creamery (now in Fayston). Before she was in the Mad River Valley, Marisa operated Ploughgate as a cheese creamery in West Glover, where she first made the Willoughby cheese. After a fire closed her creamery, Jasper Hill used Marisa's Willoughby recipe and added their own flair. A cheese was saved! Jasper Hill is only 10 miles from our farm.
Red Hen Bakery Bread and Pete's Greens Zesty Dill Freezer Pickles round out the share! These pickles are divine - made using our cukes, dill, and peppers at our on-farm kitchen (plus a few other secret ingredients).
Fat Toad Farm CaramelGoat's Milk Caramel, or Cajeta as it is traditionally called, is as good as it gets. Cajeta is very similar to the ever popular dulce de leche, a dairy based confection that uses cow’s milk. Cajeta, on the other hand has its roots in Mexico and is based on goat’s milk. Fat Toad Farm, a small family farm, is run by Judith Irving, Steve Reid and Calley Hastings. The family has spent several years building a high quality certified Alpine and Saanen goat herd producing fresh goat cheese and goat’s milk caramel (cajeta). "We hand-stir fresh goat milk and organic cane sugar over the stove for about four hours. During this time, the sugars in the milk and the sugar caramelize and produce the most incredible sweet and tasty caramel sauce. Rest assured that a lot of deep thinking and bad singing to the blasting boom box go into this caramel!"
Cheese share: We have Storm from Sweet Rowen Farmstead. This is a bloomy rind cheese with a creamy interior. You can eat the rind!
Bread Share: Charlie Emers of Patchwork Farm and Bakery was featured in a recent online article at the site Happy Vermont. Check it out!

The Spring Share ends soon!

Only THREE weeks left of the spring eating season! Our new customizable share system takes effect June 12. This system doesn't reflect your balance as of right now, but I will get it updated this week. In the meantime, you can check your contact info, share, site, and more. Here's a list of FAQs that explains more about the new system.
Share prices and offerings are the same! We've added two new pickup sites (one in South Burlington at DR Power and the other downtown Burlington at Main Street Landing) and I'm working on re-opening a site in Berlin.

Around the Farm

Phew! Non-stop action these days. Our crew has spent the last week transplanting onions into the field. Today we had our first field harvest of baby greens! We're getting potatoes ready for planting and the crew is continuing to hang the ever-growing tomatoes right now as I type.
Our tractors are out and about and that means Pete is, too. Hard to catch him these days as he's constantly moving from field to field. We rotate our crop plantings each season as part of our soil fertility and nutrient management practices. Every season is a little different...
We didn't get any snow this morning at the farm, thankfully, but it has been damp and cool. The short teases of sun and heat provide a different kind of challenge for our veggie growth. Meanwhile, we have a crew erecting a new tractor shed and Eloise is preparing to open our seasonal farmstand next week.
We are also back at the Capital City Farmer's Market in Montpelier on Saturdays. This week it's my turn to work the market! Come visit us! I love meeting our CSA members and happy to talk veggies. It's my first time working the market for our farm and I look forward to it. We are in the parking lot just off State St. It's a new location, so if you don't find us in our usual spot, keep going!
That's about all on this front. See you next week!
~Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun / Spinach: Lots of good fresh greens! We pre-wash both bagged spinach and mesclun but recommend giving your baby greens a nice rinse before eating. Purple bags will get mesclun and spinach. For yellow bag members, you'll receive either mesclun and spinach or 2 bags of spinach or spinach AND extra fiddleheads!
Fiddleheads: This time of year we try to gather foraged food for members to mix it up. We are dependent on our foragers and whatever they bring us we pass along to you. Fiddleheads are the tightly coiled tips of ferns, usually the ostrich fern. Fiddleheads have a grassy, spring-like flavor with a hint of nuttiness. Many people agree that they taste like a cross between asparagus and young spinach. Some detect an artichoke flavor as well, and even a bit of mushroom. Prepare your fiddleheads for cooking by running them under cold water and rinsing free the brown soft skin around the heads. To cook them, bring a pot of salted water to a boil, and toss in the fiddleheads for one minute. Then remove them and run cool water over them to stop the cooking. This blanching step will tenderize them uniformly, and you can now toss them into any other dish you are making, pastas, alongside rice, sauteed with garlic and crushed red pepper as a side, etc.
Chard or Pac Choi: Yellow bags will receive either Barese chard or pac choi, and it might be hard to tell the difference! The Barese variety looks similar to pac choi and can be used like pac choi or Swiss chard. You can enjoy it chopped up and added to salads, boiled, steamed, or sauteed. Store up to 5 days in the fridge in a tightly sealed plastic bag.
European Cucumbers - These long, skinny cukes taste like a burst of summer. In an ideal world they like to be kept at about 50 degrees or they may go soft in a couple days. I keep mine bagged and toss them in the crisper drawer and they keep a few days longer than that. But this time of year, they get eaten too fast and storage isn't an issue. This is our first crop of them - enjoy!!
Basil: This versatile herb is a member of the mint family. It is a staple in Mediterranean cooking as well as other cuisines. The herb is highly aromatic, or put another way, the oils in basil are highly volatile. Thus, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process, so it will retain its maximum essence and flavor. Basil should be kept in a plastic bag or kept stems down in a glass of water with plastic over the leaves for about a week with regular water changing. Keep your basil out of the extreme cold as it could damage the fragile leaves. *Basil is in the MESCLUN*

Recipes

Quick- Cooked Pac Choi
1 bunch pac choi
3 Tbsp peanut or neutral oil (like grapeseed or corn)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Cut the leaves from the stems of the pac choi. Trim the stems as necessary then cut into roughly 1-in pieces. Rinse well. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the stems and cook, stirring occasionally, until they lose their crunch (about 3 minutes). Add the greens and about ½ cu water or vegetable stock.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid evaporates and the stems become very tender, about 10 minutes. Add more water if necessary. Sprinkle with S&P and serve immediately.
Fiddleheads Pasta
Here's a simple recipe for fiddleheads. If you don't have fiddleheads, you can toss mustard greens or chard ingo the saute instead. Different dish, still delish. If using fiddleheads, use angel hair pasta or orzo, or Israeli couscous or some other light pasta that isn't too thick and heavy. 
In a large pot of boiling salted water, blanch the fiddleheads until they are crisp-tender, about 1 to 2 minutes. Remove the fiddleheads from the water and shock them in a bowl of ice water (unless you are going to use them immediately).Drop pasta into the same pot of boiling water used for fiddleheads. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes or until al dente (depending on kind of pasta you have available).
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat olive oil. Saute fiddlehead ferns (or fresh greens), green onions, and red pepper flakes for 2 minutes. Drain pasta and add to skillet. Toss with truffle oil (or olive oil) and salt and pepper. Divide pasta among 4 plates and garnish with grated cheese and black pepper.
Penne with Wilted Greens, Cheese and Fresh Basil
This is more of a suggestion than a recipe. Substitution opportunities are endless!
1 lb penne pasta (or any shape pasta)
Olive oil
3-6 Cloves garlic, minced
3-8 cups of greens, tough stems removed, greens chopped (spinach, mustard, mizuna, Pac Choi)
1/2 to 1 cup of tomato sauce
Goat cheese or Willoughby!
Fresh chopped basil
Put a large pot of salted water on and bring to boil for the pasta. While water is heating, mince the garlic, chop the greens and any other vegetables you have on hand that you'd like to throw in (see options below). Once the veggies are all chopped and prepared and water is boiling, add pasta and cook to al dente (8-12 mins depending on pasta type).
While the pasta is cooking, put a large saute pan over medium heat. Once the pan is hot, add 2-3 TB of olive oil and the garlic to the pan and stir to coat and cook for a minute or two. Add the tomato sauce (or fresh tomatoes or sun dried tomatoes). Add other optional veggies in order of necessary cooking time and cook until not quite tender. Add the greens and cover pan until greens are just wilted at which time other veggies will now be tender. Remove cover. Drain the pasta, and in a large bowl or in the original pasta pot mix together the pasta and veggies saute and the fresh chopped basil. Serve on plates with crumbled goat cheese and the optional toasted nuts on top. 
Optional Ingredients:
2-3 TB Toasted Pine Nuts, Walnuts, Pecans, or Almonds. Toast on a dry skillet (cast iron ideal) on the stovetop over medium heat until they become fragrant. Don't let them burn. Remove from heat to a bowl.
Sundried tomatoes - use just 2-4 as too many can overpower a dish. Soak in hot water if they are very dry, and once softened, chop/mince them.
Other fresh veggies - 1-2 fresh tomatoes, broccoli, asparagus etc. Add these to the saute as necessary to cook til just tender

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
Pssst! Did you notice that with your new member account, you won't have to email me anymore! You'll be able to make the change on your own!! Schedule up to a year in advance!
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com