Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 15, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Basil (IN your mesclun), Spinach, Chard, Cucumber, Fiddleheads, Onions, and Carrots

EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun OR Spinach, Spinach, Chard OR Pac Choi, Cucumber, Fiddleheads, Onions, and Carrots

LEAN & GREEN


Mesclun, Basil (IN your mesclun), Lettuce, Chard, Carrots, Cucumber, Spinach Bunch

Pantry/ Localvore Items


Cellars at Jasper Hill Willoughby: This is a washed-rind soft cow's milk cheese with a buttery and complex flavor, and a gooey interior. It pairs well with rose wine, saison beer, or raw honey. While not for everyone, the gooey soft cheeses are staple items in my house, and Jasper Hill excels at them! I encourage to try soft cheese like Willoughby with an open mind and a ready palate. With the soft cheeses, it's always best to eat them at room temperature, so let it sit out for a bit before indulging. The backstory on this cheese is an interesting one. Pantry Share members familiar with our CSA have had butter from Marisa Mauro at Ploughgate Creamery (now in Fayston). Before she was in the Mad River Valley, Marisa operated Ploughgate as a cheese creamery in West Glover, where she first made the Willoughby cheese. After a fire closed her creamery, Jasper Hill used Marisa's Willoughby recipe and added their own flair. A cheese was saved! Jasper Hill is only 10 miles from our farm.
Red Hen Bakery Bread and Pete's Greens Zesty Dill Freezer Pickles round out the share! These pickles are divine - made using our cukes, dill, and peppers at our on-farm kitchen (plus a few other secret ingredients).
Fat Toad Farm CaramelGoat's Milk Caramel, or Cajeta as it is traditionally called, is as good as it gets. Cajeta is very similar to the ever popular dulce de leche, a dairy based confection that uses cow’s milk. Cajeta, on the other hand has its roots in Mexico and is based on goat’s milk. Fat Toad Farm, a small family farm, is run by Judith Irving, Steve Reid and Calley Hastings. The family has spent several years building a high quality certified Alpine and Saanen goat herd producing fresh goat cheese and goat’s milk caramel (cajeta). "We hand-stir fresh goat milk and organic cane sugar over the stove for about four hours. During this time, the sugars in the milk and the sugar caramelize and produce the most incredible sweet and tasty caramel sauce. Rest assured that a lot of deep thinking and bad singing to the blasting boom box go into this caramel!"
Cheese share: We have Storm from Sweet Rowen Farmstead. This is a bloomy rind cheese with a creamy interior. You can eat the rind!
Bread Share: Charlie Emers of Patchwork Farm and Bakery was featured in a recent online article at the site Happy Vermont. Check it out!

The Spring Share ends soon!

Only THREE weeks left of the spring eating season! Our new customizable share system takes effect June 12. This system doesn't reflect your balance as of right now, but I will get it updated this week. In the meantime, you can check your contact info, share, site, and more. Here's a list of FAQs that explains more about the new system.
Share prices and offerings are the same! We've added two new pickup sites (one in South Burlington at DR Power and the other downtown Burlington at Main Street Landing) and I'm working on re-opening a site in Berlin.

Around the Farm

Phew! Non-stop action these days. Our crew has spent the last week transplanting onions into the field. Today we had our first field harvest of baby greens! We're getting potatoes ready for planting and the crew is continuing to hang the ever-growing tomatoes right now as I type.
Our tractors are out and about and that means Pete is, too. Hard to catch him these days as he's constantly moving from field to field. We rotate our crop plantings each season as part of our soil fertility and nutrient management practices. Every season is a little different...
We didn't get any snow this morning at the farm, thankfully, but it has been damp and cool. The short teases of sun and heat provide a different kind of challenge for our veggie growth. Meanwhile, we have a crew erecting a new tractor shed and Eloise is preparing to open our seasonal farmstand next week.
We are also back at the Capital City Farmer's Market in Montpelier on Saturdays. This week it's my turn to work the market! Come visit us! I love meeting our CSA members and happy to talk veggies. It's my first time working the market for our farm and I look forward to it. We are in the parking lot just off State St. It's a new location, so if you don't find us in our usual spot, keep going!
That's about all on this front. See you next week!
~Taylar
 

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun / Spinach: Lots of good fresh greens! We pre-wash both bagged spinach and mesclun but recommend giving your baby greens a nice rinse before eating. Purple bags will get mesclun and spinach. For yellow bag members, you'll receive either mesclun and spinach or 2 bags of spinach or spinach AND extra fiddleheads!
Fiddleheads: This time of year we try to gather foraged food for members to mix it up. We are dependent on our foragers and whatever they bring us we pass along to you. Fiddleheads are the tightly coiled tips of ferns, usually the ostrich fern. Fiddleheads have a grassy, spring-like flavor with a hint of nuttiness. Many people agree that they taste like a cross between asparagus and young spinach. Some detect an artichoke flavor as well, and even a bit of mushroom. Prepare your fiddleheads for cooking by running them under cold water and rinsing free the brown soft skin around the heads. To cook them, bring a pot of salted water to a boil, and toss in the fiddleheads for one minute. Then remove them and run cool water over them to stop the cooking. This blanching step will tenderize them uniformly, and you can now toss them into any other dish you are making, pastas, alongside rice, sauteed with garlic and crushed red pepper as a side, etc.
Chard or Pac Choi: Yellow bags will receive either Barese chard or pac choi, and it might be hard to tell the difference! The Barese variety looks similar to pac choi and can be used like pac choi or Swiss chard. You can enjoy it chopped up and added to salads, boiled, steamed, or sauteed. Store up to 5 days in the fridge in a tightly sealed plastic bag.
European Cucumbers - These long, skinny cukes taste like a burst of summer. In an ideal world they like to be kept at about 50 degrees or they may go soft in a couple days. I keep mine bagged and toss them in the crisper drawer and they keep a few days longer than that. But this time of year, they get eaten too fast and storage isn't an issue. This is our first crop of them - enjoy!!
Basil: This versatile herb is a member of the mint family. It is a staple in Mediterranean cooking as well as other cuisines. The herb is highly aromatic, or put another way, the oils in basil are highly volatile. Thus, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process, so it will retain its maximum essence and flavor. Basil should be kept in a plastic bag or kept stems down in a glass of water with plastic over the leaves for about a week with regular water changing. Keep your basil out of the extreme cold as it could damage the fragile leaves. *Basil is in the MESCLUN*

Recipes

Quick- Cooked Pac Choi
1 bunch pac choi
3 Tbsp peanut or neutral oil (like grapeseed or corn)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Cut the leaves from the stems of the pac choi. Trim the stems as necessary then cut into roughly 1-in pieces. Rinse well. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the stems and cook, stirring occasionally, until they lose their crunch (about 3 minutes). Add the greens and about ½ cu water or vegetable stock.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid evaporates and the stems become very tender, about 10 minutes. Add more water if necessary. Sprinkle with S&P and serve immediately.
Fiddleheads Pasta
Here's a simple recipe for fiddleheads. If you don't have fiddleheads, you can toss mustard greens or chard ingo the saute instead. Different dish, still delish. If using fiddleheads, use angel hair pasta or orzo, or Israeli couscous or some other light pasta that isn't too thick and heavy. 
In a large pot of boiling salted water, blanch the fiddleheads until they are crisp-tender, about 1 to 2 minutes. Remove the fiddleheads from the water and shock them in a bowl of ice water (unless you are going to use them immediately).Drop pasta into the same pot of boiling water used for fiddleheads. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes or until al dente (depending on kind of pasta you have available).
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat olive oil. Saute fiddlehead ferns (or fresh greens), green onions, and red pepper flakes for 2 minutes. Drain pasta and add to skillet. Toss with truffle oil (or olive oil) and salt and pepper. Divide pasta among 4 plates and garnish with grated cheese and black pepper.
Penne with Wilted Greens, Cheese and Fresh Basil
This is more of a suggestion than a recipe. Substitution opportunities are endless!
1 lb penne pasta (or any shape pasta)
Olive oil
3-6 Cloves garlic, minced
3-8 cups of greens, tough stems removed, greens chopped (spinach, mustard, mizuna, Pac Choi)
1/2 to 1 cup of tomato sauce
Goat cheese or Willoughby!
Fresh chopped basil
Put a large pot of salted water on and bring to boil for the pasta. While water is heating, mince the garlic, chop the greens and any other vegetables you have on hand that you'd like to throw in (see options below). Once the veggies are all chopped and prepared and water is boiling, add pasta and cook to al dente (8-12 mins depending on pasta type).
While the pasta is cooking, put a large saute pan over medium heat. Once the pan is hot, add 2-3 TB of olive oil and the garlic to the pan and stir to coat and cook for a minute or two. Add the tomato sauce (or fresh tomatoes or sun dried tomatoes). Add other optional veggies in order of necessary cooking time and cook until not quite tender. Add the greens and cover pan until greens are just wilted at which time other veggies will now be tender. Remove cover. Drain the pasta, and in a large bowl or in the original pasta pot mix together the pasta and veggies saute and the fresh chopped basil. Serve on plates with crumbled goat cheese and the optional toasted nuts on top. 
Optional Ingredients:
2-3 TB Toasted Pine Nuts, Walnuts, Pecans, or Almonds. Toast on a dry skillet (cast iron ideal) on the stovetop over medium heat until they become fragrant. Don't let them burn. Remove from heat to a bowl.
Sundried tomatoes - use just 2-4 as too many can overpower a dish. Soak in hot water if they are very dry, and once softened, chop/mince them.
Other fresh veggies - 1-2 fresh tomatoes, broccoli, asparagus etc. Add these to the saute as necessary to cook til just tender

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
Pssst! Did you notice that with your new member account, you won't have to email me anymore! You'll be able to make the change on your own!! Schedule up to a year in advance!
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Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Good Eats Weekly Newsletter - May 8, 2019

In Your Share This Week:

FANCY/ LOCALVORE (PURPLE)

Mesclun, Red Mustard, Ramps, Parsley, Spinach, Pac Choi, Carrots, Onions, Turnips, Romaine


EVERYDAY STANDARD (YELLOW)

Mesclun, Cilantro, Lettuce, Carrots, Potatoes, and
OUT OF THE BAG
Frozen Squash

LEAN & GREEN


Mesclun, Lettuce, Pac Choi, Carrots, Cucumber, Spinach Bunch


Pantry/ Localvore Items


This week's share feels super local to me! Sweet Rowen, Axel, and Cate Hill Orchard (from last week) are located within 10-15 miles of our farm, and the Lazors and Lazy Lady over in Westfield are not too much further than that, albeit we're separated by our hilly geography, so as the crow flies, 15 miles is about right! Enjoy some of the fruits of our little corner!
Sweet Rowen Farmstead Farmers Cheese: This creamy cheese spread is made completely on farm from happy belted linebacks. Unopened, this will last at least 7-10 days. I like dollops of it on or in a lot of different dishes, or you can use it as a spread for sandwiches, crackers, bagels, etc.
Axel's EggsAxel McKenzie has been in the egg business since the age of 8 (approximately six years) and is growing his business on his family's farm in Craftsbury. In the winter these hens have had a yummy varied diet including leftover shoots and greens from our farm! 
Butterworks Farm Yogurt: We have Butterworks Yogurt this week. At Butterworks Farm in Westfield, Jack and Annie Lazor milk a small herd of Jerseys, all of whom are born on the farm and are fed an entirely organic diet of feeds grown on the farm. Milk from Jersey cows is rich, with a high protein count and fat content. This makes their yogurt richer than others. The non-fat yogurt produced by Butterworks is the only non-fat yogurt on the market that does not contain milk thickeners like whey protein or dry milk. Their whole milk yogurt is made from just that - whole Jersey milk straight from the cows, so the yogurt comes with a cream on top and a butterfat content of 5% - a very high amount. There will be a mix of yogurts at the sites this week - this yogurt is so good it can be breakfast, morning snack, lunch, or dessert. You'd be hard pressed to find a yogurt on the market that is made with such a small carbon footprint... Butterworks is powered by renewable energy, certified organic, and committed to farming practices that are healthy, safe, and improve environmental impact.
Cheese share: This week it's Quadratta from Lazy Lady Farm. I forgot to write about last week's cheese, Kingdom Yarg, from Cate Hill Orchard! They're an orchard and grassfed sheep farm that raises lamb, produces wool, and makes sheep dairy products. They're located in Greensboro just a few miles from us. This is the first time we've featured their cheese. Let me know what you think!

Summer is coming!!

Only FOUR weeks left of the spring eating season! We're heading into summer with our brand spanking new CSA platform! I hope you've had a chance to check it out! I'm still making sure everyone's account balances are updated. I realize there were some changes to make to pick-up sites; thanks for double checking your info! Here's a list of FAQs that explains more about the new system.
Share prices and offerings are the same! We've added two new pickup sites (one in South Burlington at DR Power and the other downtown Burlington at Main Street Landing) and I'm working on re-opening a site in Berlin.
We're also making our first foray into non-food items: milk! We're partnering with Sweet Rowen Farmstead to offer a weekly half gallon milk share. Never tried their milk? This is a great opportunity!! It's whole milk, cream top, and made right here in the Kingdom just a few miles from our farm. Paul Lisai is a young (35!) farmer who raises a heritage cow breed and the milk is absolutely divine.
We expect greens from the field next week and we're starting to see cucumbers and all those yummy summer veggies we've missed! Join us for a summer full of GOOD EATS!

Around the Farm

Last Friday, our farm crew was rocked when an article was released that revealed test results from what we thought was hemp we grew. The hemp we were given had levels of THC that move it into a different category of cannabis that we are not allowed to grow. We alerted you and other customers, friends, and supporters last week. Since then, I've been overwhelmed at the response.
The support you've all shown our farm has been immense. This is a scenario we never thought we'd be in. I stand behind our produce and our farm because it's the same produce I ate and same business I supported before working here. This has been a learning experience for us on many fronts.
We live here in the community, we shop and recreate and dine at the same places you do. We would not jeopardize our farm in that way, nor our ability to grow good food for good people.
I love Vermont for lots of reasons, but I see us as a big small community. The relationships we build here are significant. That's true as much for our farm as for the people who work here. Thanks for your support during this time. Many of you have offered assistance. There's not too much anyone can do. If you have any questions, please reach out to us.
~Taylar

Storage Tips and Recipes

Every week we'll send you snapshots of veggies in your share. You can always find more recipes and storage info on our blog and website.
Mesclun: Lots of good fresh greens! We pre-wash it but recommend giving your baby greens a nice rinse before eating.
Ramps: Purple bag members receive a bunch of ramps this week!  These ramps come from a local forager who has sustainably gathered these wild treats for you to enjoy this week from his family's land in Hardwick. Ramps can be chopped like scallions and taste great sautéed and used in place of onions or leeks, added to scrambled eggs, or even sprinkled raw over salads. You can use both the white bulb and the leaves. The leaves are much milder in flavor but make a nice green addition to lots of meals.
Romaine Lettuce: Thick Romaine leaves make a great salad or add some crunch to a sandwich. Store it in the fridge in a large plastic tub with a piece of paper towel to absorb excess moisture and condensation. If you store wet lettuce in a produce bag, it will likely only last a couple days.
Pac Choi: This variety of pac choi this week is called Joi Choi, distinguished by it's long, white stem. Use exactly like you would other pac choi (aka bok choy). Part of the cabbage family, both these Asian greens pack in nutrition with high scores for vitamins A and C and calcium. Mild enough to be chopped up for a salad, particularly if you give it a quick wilt in a hot pan, they're also great in stir-fries and sautes and in Asian soups (and other soups too). As leaves become more mature they are more often served cooked. Store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.
Rainbow CarrotsThese multi-colored carrots can add a burst of color to your salads or roasted veggies. They can even be the centerpiece of your salad if you shave them into long skinny ribbons using a vegetable peeler, then toss them in dressing.
European Cucumbers - These long, skinny cukes taste like a burst of summer. In an ideal world they like to be kept at about 50 degrees or they may go soft in a couple days. I keep mine bagged and toss them in the crisper drawer and they keep a few days longer than that. But this time of year, they get eaten too fast and storage isn't an issue. This is our first crop of them - enjoy!!
Russet Potatoes - Russet potatoes, also known as Idaho or baking potatoes, are in the class of starchy potatoes, as opposed to waxy varieties like red and fingerling. They are high in vitamin C and B6, as well as natural sugars. Russets make great baking potatoes, and are ideal for mashing and roasting. Store potatoes in a cool dark place, away from onions.

Recipes

Roasted Turnip and Ramp Salad
1 pound turnips (or substitute with 1 lb rutabaga, potatoes, or any root vegetable you have on hand) - trimmed, peeled, and cut into even 1/2-inch chunks
1 tablespoon olive oil
sea salt and pepper to taste
1/2 teaspoon paprika
3-5 ramps, cleaned and chopped
1/4 cup aioli or mayonnaise
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
2 tablespoons fresh herbs, such as parsley, chives, oregano, or thyme
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
On a rimmed baking sheet, toss turnips with 1 tablespoon olive oil, and sprinkle on sea salt, pepper, and paprika. Roast for 20 - 30 minutes, flipping turnips once halfway through cook time.
In a small bowl, combine the aioli, lemon zest and juice, and prepared horseradish.
Toss warm turnips with the ramps, and then fold in the aioli mixture. Add the herbs. Taste, and adjust salt or acid levels as needed.
Scalloped Turnips
4 Tbsp butter
1/2 cup thinly sliced onions
4 cups peeled, thinly sliced turnips
2 Tbsp flour
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup cream
Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter a 1-quart casserole. Melt 1 Tbsp butter and lightly sauté onions until just wilted.
2 Layer a third of the sliced turnips in the casserole dish; top with a third of the onion; sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of flour, 1/3 teaspoon of salt, and one grind of pepper; pat with dollops from 1 tablespoon of butter. Repeat this layering twice.
3 Mix milk and cream together and pour over the turnips. Cover and bake in a 350°F oven for 30 minutes, then remove cover and bake for another 30-45 minutes, or until tender and bubbly.
Bok Choy Salad with Sesame-Almond Crunch
If you've got chard instead of pac choi (bok choy), you can swap it in here!
topping:
1 cup slivered almonds
2 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup sesame seeds
dressing:
3 tablespoons sugar
¼ cup grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
6 green onions, thinly sliced
1½ pounds bok choy
Preheat oven to 350°F. Spread slivered almonds in a single layer on a baking sheet, and bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until golden brown. Set aside.
Sprinkle 2 tablespoons sugar in an even layer over the bottom of a saucepan set over medium heat. The moment the sugar is completely liquefied, add almonds, stirring briskly to coat, then sesame seeds, stirring until evenly distributed. Do this quickly, so that the mixture does not burn. Immediately transfer nut mixture to a plate and let cool.
In the same saucepan, bring the dressing ingredients to a boil: sugar, oil, vinegar, soy sauce, and whisk until sugar is dissolved. Add sliced green onions and remove from heat. Dressing can be used while warm or cool.
Meanwhile, slice the bok choy crosswise into ½-inch pieces. Bits of dirt can lodge themselves in the greens’ numerous crevices, so thoroughly wash and dry the greens after you’ve chopped them. Place bok choy in a large bowl, and toss with dressing. Just before serving, add the nut mixture and toss well.
Indian Carrot and Yogurt Salad
* adapted from “Quick & Easy Indian Cooking” by Madhur Jaffrey
1 c. plain yogurt, beaten lightly with a fork
2 medium carrots, coarsely grated
½ tsp. sugar
salt & cayenne pepper to taste
1 Tbsp. sunflower, safflower, or canola oil
¼ tsp. whole cumin seeds (or ground if that’s all you’ve got)
¼ tsp. whole black or yellow mustard seeds
3 Tbsp. raisins

Mix yogurt, carrots, sugar, salt, & cayenne. In a small frying pan, heat oil over medium high heat.
Add cumin & mustard seeds.
Stir a few times & as soon as they start to pop add raisins.
Stir once & empty contents into yogurt-carrot mixture & mix.

Need to Skip a Week?

You can donate your share to the food shelf, receive a second share the following week, or receive a credit on your account. We ask for one week's notice.
Sorry, no changes to the week's delivery after 8 am on Monday of that week.
Pssst! Did you notice that with your new member account, you won't have to email me anymore! You'll be able to make the change on your own!! Schedule up to a year in advance!
FacebookTwitterInstagram
Questions? Contact Taylar, goodeats@petesgreens.com